What should I do to get a job in 2 months in a good IT company like a product-based company or a startup?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Finlay Fraser



What should I do to get a job in 2 months in a good IT company like a product-based company or a startup?

Don't get tired so soon! . There is still a long way to go. Since you mentioned that you don't need long and boring advice. I will finish it shortly.

There are no good and bad companies. It depends on how you take it.

If it's good, love your job and your team. Success and growth will follow.

If it's bad, keep loving your job and your team. But develop the habit of working on what interests you as soon as you return home. This will increase your confidence level to break up interviews. In no time, do not lose hope and confidence. Always think that you can study and you can do it. You will achieve it in the future.

ALL THE BEST

I was asking myself a similar question about 4.5 years ago when I decided to join the software industry. He also knew that he was not sufficiently prepared to work as a product manager at the time. It wasn't very technical and while I realized I had the potential to add value by DOING SOMETHING in this industry, I didn't know exactly what, or how to find out.

This is what I did:

  • I found friends who worked as programmers and with whom we had some shared interests
  • began to go out with them and talk to them regularly about their work, about the structure of the companies they worked for, about their decision
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I was asking myself a similar question about 4.5 years ago when I decided to join the software industry. He also knew that he was not sufficiently prepared to work as a product manager at the time. It wasn't very technical and while I realized I had the potential to add value by DOING SOMETHING in this industry, I didn't know exactly what, or how to find out.

This is what I did:

  • I found friends who worked as programmers and with whom we had some shared interests
  • He started hanging out with them and talking to them regularly about his work, about the structure of the companies they worked for, about their decision-making processes, about the processes related to software delivery, etc.
  • I read a book recommended by one of the developers as a first step to understanding the industry; it was a comparison between Kanban and Scrum. Very, very good book! Kanban and Scrum: Making the Most of Both
  • I enrolled in a C # academy for complete beginners, as I thought my only way to get in was by having been a developer for some time, with a few years of experience behind me ...
  • I left the academy, as I understood that I could become good at programming, but it was not what excited me (at the time). I also found that quite a few companies were looking for people with good business experience, critical thinking, good social skills AND motivation to perform management roles (including product management).
  • A friend of mine was looking for an account manager at the software company he was a partner with. I solved the case they had prepared for the interview and ... I joined the first software company of my life.
  • It was very difficult, I was the only person without any technical knowledge in the company ... apart from the secretary ... and it took me time to earn a place in the team.
  • While doing account management, I gradually started helping clients with product decisions and process-related matters (it took me a few months to realize I was actually doing it)
  • I kept reading literally anything on topics / terms that I heard mentioned by some of the company's partners or developers: AJAX, API, Java, Product Roadmap, Business Model Canvas, Value Proposition Canvas, HTML, CSS; there was no filter on the topics I wanted to understand at least at a high level
  • Gradually I understood that I had good potential for a product manager, but I needed to focus my learnings on that.
  • I found a great mentor in front of the CTO of the company, who was also the process leader in the team; helped me by pointing out things I needed to improve and ... keep suggesting further reading
  • I kept improving, experimenting, learning ...
  • Obtained a Scrum Product Owner Certification
  • Little by little I began to introduce process improvements in the company (of course, I had the support of two of the founders of the company, which was very important)
  • Later we started a new company and ... and it was a complicated process. With many gaps to fill, many missing roles, a lot of internal and external pressure from multiple directions. I saw the opportunity to start as a dedicated product owner for the first time, in the first new project that I (with the help of my partners) had won for the company.
  • I've been a dedicated product owner ever since and ... almost nothing has changed in my attitude - I keep asking people what could be improved, I keep observing situations and trying to figure out how to improve them, I keep reading about new potential solutions, keep on experimenting on the job with new process improvements, tools, approaches, etc.
  • There are few differences between my approach to things now and 4.5 years ago:
    - I have a much, much clearer approach
    - I have a better understanding of the technicalities and limitations of creating a software product
    - I know software The code only comes to meet an objective that in turn fulfills a product vision. And the latter are things that people find it difficult to define, much less evolve. But those are the critical things that make the difference between the success and failure of a product.

    AND THAT?

    So… think early. I think that's all you need to transition into the role you want. Well, of course, you will invest time and effort.

    Be humble, forget about your ego, build an arsenal of practices and tools, give them a try, and dare to try things for the first time. At first, you won't have enough (any) experience, but you can make up for that with internal motivation and extra effort. Sooner or later you will gain experience ... only to realize that the world of unknowns is much bigger than you first thought. And to handle it, you don't need to know every aspect of this world, you just need to be able to navigate and adapt.

    I hope this is useful.

You have a computer science degree, you like creating things, you love to code, you have a clear idea of ​​where you would like to spend your career, and you are ready to work hard to get there.

My friend, you are on the right track. I can safely say that you will achieve your goal. Whether it will take just 2-3 months or a little longer will depend on many factors, including the hiring cycles of the major product development companies and how many places you will attend interviews, etc.

He had included large product development companies (such as Microsoft) as his choice of employer, but

Keep reading

You have a computer science degree, you like creating things, you love to code, you have a clear idea of ​​where you would like to spend your career, and you are ready to work hard to get there.

My friend, you are on the right track. I can safely say that you will achieve your goal. Whether it will take just 2-3 months or a little longer will depend on many factors, including the hiring cycles of the major product development companies and how many places you will attend interviews, etc.

I had included large product development companies (such as Microsoft) as your employer choice, but my suggestion would be to look for much smaller but successful companies - you will have better exposure, get your hands on multiple technologies / products, and generally have fun. more in smaller product development companies.

My take on how to prepare:

1. Strong Fundamentals: Product companies are generally looking for people with strong fundamentals. At my previous company we had a saying that we will hire people "who know everything about something and something about everything."

In other words, we will look for candidates who can delve into some technological area or programming language, and who have knowledge of related technologies. So you need to introspect and decide what your strong areas are, it can be a programming language, for example core java oc ++, and fundamentals like data structures and algorithms. It would be difficult to go through intense technical interviews without having a solid foundation. Interviewers can overlook mistakes made in a complex and advanced syntax or program. But a fundamental error with the concepts of OOAD or to go wrong in a simple algorithm would be unacceptable.

2. Your Online Presence - These days, it's relatively easy to establish your credentials as a programming enthusiast. Your lack of top-notch academic training can easily be overcome by ensuring a credible online signature. Have an active github profile, with many contributions to your favorite open source project. Have an active stackoverflow account with questions and answers provided. These would be indicators to a hiring manager that you really have a passion for scheduling.

3. Adapt to market needs: At any given time, there are technologies that are in high demand and technologies that are "out of date." You would increase your chances by constantly observing market needs and staying up-to-date on the “taste of the day” of technology. It's fine if you don't know things in depth, but you need to be familiar with the terminologies and have a cursory understanding of the concepts (ex: Hadoop, Functional Programming ...)

I wish you good luck!

First I will try to explain it in simple words. Imagine a situation where you have to buy a shirt.

Product-based:
Consider a brand like Louis Philippe. They already have shirts of different prints and sizes. All you have to do is pick them up from the shelves. So the shirt you pick up is an existing Louis Philippe product. Therefore, it is a product-based company.

Service Based -
This could be your personal tailor or a brand like Raymond where you have the option of customizing a shirt based on your need and size. You can sew any design on the shirt. This customization function is n

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First I will try to explain it in simple words. Imagine a situation where you have to buy a shirt.

Product-based:
Consider a brand like Louis Philippe. They already have shirts of different prints and sizes. All you have to do is pick them up from the shelves. So the shirt you pick up is an existing Louis Philippe product. Therefore, it is a product-based company.

Service Based -
This could be your personal tailor or a brand like Raymond where you have the option of customizing a shirt based on your need and size. You can sew any design on the shirt. This personalization feature is nothing more than a form of service provided by the brand, so it falls into the category of service-based businesses.

Now think about the big picture. I will try to explain it in simple terms.
For example, Apple or Samsung. These giant companies mainly build smartphones, which is their product. You cannot change the quality of the device's camera, nor can you increase or decrease the screen size. You have to accept the product as it is.

When it comes to service-based businesses, there are hundreds of IT companies that provide thousands of services, to say the least.
Consider the example of a luxury car with a television system inside. The automaker may not necessarily have built the television system. This could have been done by another company that only creates television systems and integrates them with the car.
Therefore, the automobile television manufacturing company provides services to the luxury automobile manufacturing company, the automobile being its product.


Lastly, your current profile sounds great. Try to find out the scope and feasibility of the products you are working for, if they could be high impact technologies in the near future.
If not, take it as a learning experience and look for opportunities. Remember, learning is the mind's eye!

Health!

Focus on the following areas to decipher almost any scheduling interview. Competitive programming is not required. You can learn a lot through your regular course work in good schools. Don't skip classes, work hard on your assignments and don't outsource them :-) Data structures: Matrix, Linked List, Stack, Queue, Hash Table, BST, Map (Hash vs Tree), Set, Trie, Graph. Applications and pros and cons of these algorithms: temporal complexity, spatial complexity, classification, search, BFS and DFS, dynamic programming ...

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I think I am the best person to answer this.

Actually, I was in the same situation before 8 months. I was working at Infosys and I had the same problems you mentioned. Finally, after preparing a lot (6 months of Microsoft .NET technologies preparation), I managed to land in PRODUCT-based companies. I had two offers at the same time.

I had a real experience in .NET development of less than 2 years and I faced the interviews with 3-5 years of experience.

So the point here is that you have to make a decision for yourself. Start preparing for any technology or profile that needs to change. Set your

Keep reading

I think I am the best person to answer this.

Actually, I was in the same situation before 8 months. I was working at Infosys and I had the same problems you mentioned. Finally, after preparing a lot (6 months of Microsoft .NET technologies preparation), I managed to land in PRODUCT-based companies. I had two offers at the same time.

I had a real experience in .NET development of less than 2 years and I faced the interviews with 3-5 years of experience.

So the point here is that you have to make a decision for yourself. Start preparing for any technology or profile that needs to change. Set your goals and strive to achieve them. You must prioritize things and work accordingly.

I hope that helps.

If you need help, do not hesitate to write to us.

All the best.

For more related questions, you can subscribe to my blog here.

Yes, you can always get a job in a product-based company.
You should use the same method of looking for a job that you would have done for any other IT company such as using Linekdin, sharing your resume with a placement agency, submitting your resume through friends or family to the respective HR of the product-based company, etc.

My advice is that in case your experience involves 6 months of training. Get at least 6 months of experience and then apply for product-based companies.

Product-based companies are no different from service-based companies in that they all seek skill sets that match job responsibilities. That said, if a person has certain technical or domain skills that suit the job requirements, applying to a product-based company is no different than applying to a service-based company. What is different is who the clients are, the job admission process, and the support models.

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