What should I do if I want to be a teacher, but I don't know what to teach?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Toby Turner



What should I do if I want to be a teacher, but I don't know what to teach?

Most educational programs are geared toward obtaining a general education license for elementary or secondary school. Elementary is where you teach all subjects, so you really don't have to choose unless you decide you want to teach art, music, or physical education. Regardless, you need your regular general education license, so start there. If you want to teach in high school, you can take all of your general education classes before you have to start taking your subject-specific classes.

I recommend that you observe many teachers in different grades and subjects. Something is likely to pique your interest. Don'

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Most educational programs are geared toward obtaining a general education license for elementary or secondary school. Elementary is where you teach all subjects, so you really don't have to choose unless you decide you want to teach art, music, or physical education. Regardless, you need your regular general education license, so start there. If you want to teach in high school, you can take all of your general education classes before you have to start taking your subject-specific classes.

I recommend that you observe many teachers in different grades and subjects. Something is likely to pique your interest. Do not worry! You don't have to choose before you start!

You can also change your mind after you've been teaching for a while. Many teachers get "endorsements" for other subjects. I didn't do elementary education and then got a high school science endorsement and high school social studies. You can learn, grow, and change as you go.

I think a little reflection would help:

  1. What subjects did you enjoy in school?
  2. What subjects were you good at?
  3. What are the things that fascinate or interest you these days?

By reflecting, you will discover potential options for what to teach.

Another thing you can do is tutor or volunteer. You can try various themes and see which one suits your personality and interest.

Good luck!

You should teach math and / or science. First, you will have better job opportunities. There are plenty of fruitcakes hoping to teach literary English or romantic languages. There are far fewer math and science teachers, so you can always find a job. And it will have the added benefit of preparing children for the world they are about to enter. It is true that they may not see it that way, but the reality in terms of realities is the people. All the high-paying jobs of the future will have their roots in math and science.

Do you know the age of the students you would like to teach? If you are interested in teaching younger students then elementary would be great because then it teaches all subjects. If you think you want to teach older students, think about the subjects in school that inspired you the most. Teaching a subject that you love helps you be a better teacher.

Teach in elementary school, where you are expected to teach all subjects.

Then you can move on to high school and teach the subjects of your choice.

6 years primary, 14 years jr. high, 15 years high school was my record.

Because it is an extremely difficult job that everyone thinks is easy. The lack of respect from the community and even my own family has been alarming, even after 23 years.

I speak as a primary school teacher (kindergarten-4th). If you are considering secondary education, my answer may not be relevant.

Where you teach in the United States makes a huge difference. I live in a part of the United States that allows me an annual salary that allows me to support my family. This is not the case at all for much of our nation. Teaching requires a bachelor's degree. Think about the money that

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Because it is an extremely difficult job that everyone thinks is easy. The lack of respect from the community and even my own family has been alarming, even after 23 years.

I speak as a primary school teacher (kindergarten-4th). If you are considering secondary education, my answer may not be relevant.

Where you teach in the United States makes a huge difference. I live in a part of the United States that allows me an annual salary that allows me to support my family. This is by no means the case for much of our nation. Teaching requires a bachelor's degree. Think about the money you will invest in your degree compared to the salary you will receive. Choose where you will live and teach carefully. Unfortunately, even in my own district, if the teacher is the only parent working in a home, the teacher will almost always have a second job.

A huge part of teaching is behavior management. The lack of support from parents and often administrators is shocking. You are on your own. If you are teaching elementary school students, there is absolutely nothing I can tell you that will set you up for the disrespect and often the physical and verbal violence that you will witness and receive in the classroom. It takes years and a lot of support (if you're lucky) to master handling student outbursts in the classroom. Our culture (and from what I have been told ... modern psychology) is not equipped to recognize mental illness in young children. The attitude seems to be that the child will outgrow it. It is heartbreaking to have a student in your class who is in desperate need of mental health services. No one will listen to you.

Let's move on to your "area of ​​expertise." The workload is overwhelming. It is impossible to prepare and plan only during your planning period. Most teachers spend hours every day before and after school and on weekends to prepare lessons. Usually their preparation period is spent trying to communicate with parents. Or collaboration with colleagues. Meetings for students and with the faculty as a whole are time consuming, frustrating and useless. The amount of paperwork you need to complete each year should be done on your own time. You will not be able to complete it during the school day.

Every year local administrators and the state add to the paperwork we have to do. Or the professional development hours that we must complete. Or the requirements for a satisfactory observation. Nothing is ever taken off or taken off.

My latest information indicated that between 50 and 55 percent of first-year teachers are no longer in the classroom after five years. No other business can survive with that level of turnover. While the media places great importance on teachers abusing students, which should be because of teacher certification, morals, and ethics, rarely does anything come from the abuse teachers receive from students. students. Much of that begins in the student's home.

No other job that I am aware of has to endure constant criticism, except perhaps the last two years of the presidency. Teachers cannot choose their raw materials.

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My latest information indicated that between 50 and 55 percent of first-year teachers are no longer in the classroom after five years. No other business can survive with that level of turnover. While the media places great importance on teachers abusing students, which should be because of teacher certification, morals, and ethics, rarely does anything come from the abuse teachers receive from students. students. Much of that begins in the student's home.

No other job that I am aware of has to endure constant criticism, except perhaps the last two years of the presidency. Teachers cannot pick and choose their raw product. They can't filter through quality control. There are some higher-level classes that filter students by prerequisites. But most teachers get what they get and try to do the best they can with what they get.

Yes, in light of the demands placed on them and expected of them, they are underpaid. The fact is that no amount of money spent on education will improve the raw material, the students themselves. If a student is unwilling to make an effort, there is no way anyone will. Students know it too.

Common Core has outlined a curriculum, but schools, in an effort to provide the same education for all, as required by various groups, have basically used the common core as a definitive daily guide for progress throughout the school year. . If a child misses a day, there is a chance to catch up on the class and the curriculum. The more days that are missed, the less likely the child will catch up or stay on the common core curriculum. Teachers try to do their best to avoid losing material. More classroom aides have been hired, but they are also overwhelmed by the demands placed on them.

Many administrators become administrators to escape the classroom. While they are supposed to be expert teachers, few have extensive enough experience to assess the different requirements needed in the various classrooms and subjects. While there is a general basis for teaching, not all students respond to basic teaching methods. For disruptive students, the methods of dealing with them differ from those for regular students. And the conflicts between fostering individuality and groupthink in the classroom have never been thoroughly investigated or resolved. Administrators have as many variables as teachers, and hiring tends to favor those who have been in one district the longest and have the fewest experiences from various school districts.

About 80 to 85 percent of the school budget goes to teacher salaries. The rest are supposed to be for utilities, maintenance, repairs, texting, etc. There are restrictions on how school funds can be spent. Legislation calls for a maze of accounting requirements to keep track of funds. A small portion of the funds are available for the needs of teachers, but are controlled by administrators. If a teacher has taken the wrong side of an administrator, that teacher, even within the department's budget, may find himself drawing on personal income to support students. The IRS offers a $ 500 tax deduction. Few teachers fall short of that amount.

Why don't they quit? Why? According to the scores of the graduate registration exam, the teachers are as average as possible. They have the same fears, the same hopes, the same dreams as everyone else. Some see teaching as a safe haven for work. Some feel called to a vocation. Some feel they have no other choice. Some may not know any better until they have the experience and then quit. But the question arises: Was it because of the parents, the rest of the staff, the administrators, the workload, or the students? Was it stress? Or was it because of responsibilities?

Perhaps the real question should be: Why stay? Yet they do. Tipping windmills and banging their heads against walls of apathy to try to save our peoples and communities from ignorance, incompetence and to try to teach civility and citizenship to young social media addicts.

I bet you don't know that our military personnel can function for about nine months before their functional abilities begin to deteriorate to the point where they need to be removed from the battlefield. Students are in school for about 180 days, or nine months as well. The behavioral characteristics after nine months are very similar between the two. It used to be called battle fatigue. Children suffer from it. Teachers suffer from it too. Except no one understands that teachers are expected to continue to perform at peak levels throughout the year because they are expected to demonstrate continuous learning to maintain professional standards and certifications.

And you complain that they complain and you want them to stop. As a citizen of this great country, as a first-generation citizen, I thank you for your appreciation and concern. My family members served humanity for countless years and this is the gratitude that they and all the teachers receive from you. In fact, the real question should be: Why are they staying?

I am a private school teacher. I started my teaching career in an expensive area. However, at that time I was single and it was quite easy to live economically in this area, which is what I did, investing a large% of my salary. Working in a private school in an expensive area will bring tutoring opportunities, which can pay off very well. 10 years ago, depending on travel, I was charging $ 80 to $ 100 per hour for tutoring 1 to 2 hours a week. One teacher taught much more than that and got her pilot's license paid for in full with her tutoring money. After I got married, I moved, because we weren't going

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I am a private school teacher. I started my teaching career in an expensive area. However, at that time I was single and it was quite easy to live economically in this area, which is what I did, investing a large% of my salary. Working in a private school in an expensive area will bring tutoring opportunities, which can pay off very well. 10 years ago, depending on travel, I was charging $ 80 to $ 100 per hour for tutoring 1 to 2 hours a week. One teacher taught much more than that and got her pilot's license paid for in full with her tutoring money. After I got married, I moved, because we weren't going to be able to have the lifestyle we wanted in that area based on how much we were earning, mainly because house prices were crazy, although the rent for the apartments was not that bad.

Because I work in the world of private schools, it is much easier to move. I didn't have to deal with state certification, and instead of a pension, I have a 403b that I keep when I change schools and move. I am also in a high demand specialty. There are international, national and regional scouting agencies that work with you to find a suitable school, so it is easy to find available positions that fit reasonable criteria.

I used my highest salary from the above area as a starting point in salary negotiation. Because I am not part of a union, my salary is negotiable and, being in a high demand specialty, I negotiated a relatively high salary. I had also spent time looking at the cost of living, not just a simple calculator, but one that would give me a good idea of ​​how much my expected personal lifestyle would actually cost.

I currently live in a metropolitan area of ​​over a million, I own a nice home in a good neighborhood that is conveniently located near restaurants, nightlife, downtown, and my school. My wife and I can live comfortably on my salary, including the ability to continue investing in my retirement at a level that will likely allow me to retire in my 50s. Your income from part-time work is used solely for fun. We are very comfortable financially. Not having children helps a lot with this.

Tl / dr version:

Teach in a high-demand specialty (math, physics, computer science, or similar)

Get a job at a private school in an area where wages are higher and live cheaply being young and single for a few years, saving as much as possible. Do some private tutoring.

Work hard and within 5 years or so you will probably see a nice increase in salary as you prove yourself.

Move to a less expensive area using your current salary as a price anchor for your services when negotiating your salary. You will likely take a pay cut, but you will end up winning financially.

Don't be distressed. You have so many options! First, make sure as much as you can that you no longer want to be a teacher. You don't want to make a hasty decision, regret it, and waste time and money.

I taught for 7 years and it is a great profession that I miss (therefore I am still writing about teaching on Quora), but I have absolutely no regrets about my decision to switch careers to a completely different field - web development!

You can always go back to teaching if you want to; teachers are often in high demand. So what I did when I decided for sure to quit teaching was make a list of hobbies and

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Don't be distressed. You have so many options! First, make sure as much as you can that you no longer want to be a teacher. You don't want to make a hasty decision, regret it, and waste time and money.

I taught for 7 years and it is a great profession that I miss (therefore I am still writing about teaching on Quora), but I have absolutely no regrets about my decision to switch careers to a completely different field - web development!

You can always go back to teaching if you want to; teachers are often in high demand. So what I did when I decided to quit teaching was make a list of hobbies and jobs that I enjoyed or think I might enjoy. I started taking courses in these areas to see what I would like to continue with.

As a teacher, you have a lot of translatable skills. I constantly hear from potential employers how they love the teaching experience. You are patient, kind, cooperative, a team player, capable of multitasking, a good learner and communicator, well organized, detail oriented, and excellent at problem solving, especially on the spot - you know, improvising! Ha ha, of course I know he never "liked" him as a teacher.

I believe in making your destiny. Don't settle if you don't want to.

Here are some resources on other related careers you can slide into:

  • Five alternative careers for teachers
  • http://www.reallygoodstuff.com/community/20-job-ideas-for-teachers/
  • Alternatives to teaching: 20 companies that hire teachers

Or, skip the career-related resources and decide for yourself what you'd like to do. There is a saying: do a job that you enjoy and you would not work a day in your life. Well that's not really realistic because a job is a job. But still, find something close to that.

However, be smart! Save money and make sure you're covered before exploring and finding yourself. Good luck!

In fact, I've been thinking about this a lot lately.

Right now I am going to school for music education, intending to teach in secondary schools. Eventually, I would also like to teach at the college / university level. However, it is a trade-off between having more impact on younger students and having more freedom with more experienced students, most of whom will major in music. But I would also like to have that same moment that my band director had before I graduated from high school, when I told him that I wanted to major in music, specifically music education, his job. As a teacher, you get

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In fact, I've been thinking about this a lot lately.

Right now I am going to school for music education, intending to teach in secondary schools. Eventually, I would also like to teach at the college / university level. However, it is a trade-off between having more impact on younger students and having more freedom with more experienced students, most of whom will major in music. But I would also like to have that same moment that my band director had before I graduated from high school, when I told him I wanted to major in music, specifically music education, his job. As a teacher, you have to deal with a lot of trials and struggles and tons of red tape and red tape, but at the end of the day, it's the kids you reach that you can inspire that really make it worthwhile. I want to do that; I want to be part of that.

But at the same time, honestly, I'm a little terrified of the prospect of teaching. I don't know if I could handle a large classroom, or the administrative aspects of leading a marching band, or calling parents, or something like that. I have tried teaching a few times before and although I know I just need more practice, more time, I am not very good at breaking big things into small pieces; I have a lot of knowledge that I try to share, but the looks confuse me and I scratch my head because I have no idea how to think like a student who doesn't think like I think, and that's really what worries me the most. upon; I can't even begin to think about the idea that the things I live and breathe don't make sense to someone else. For me, I can hear someone say verbally, "Oh, it's easy, just take the iv V7 VI6 and go to the chromatic way, so I can modulate Eb, firm up the theme and end up in a true perfect ”, and I will nod and fully understand that mess of confusing musical language. But someone with less theoretical experience than me, with much less natural talent for deciphering musical language, would have a terrible time finding out what all that means.

So, besides all the ordeal of not knowing how to teach, I'm not even sure if that's what I want to do. I don't even know if I want to go to graduate school or not, and I have so many big plans that I can't say what I want to do next semester, let alone for the rest of my life (or at least a large part). I want to compose for band, orchestra, choir, and solo performers, and I want to compose music for video games, movies, and television shows, and I want to play in a jazz band, or in a large concert band, or even try to succeed as a soloist. I want to build instruments, and I want to fix them, and I want to be a famous rock star and write great beats for emerging rappers. I don't know what I want to do exactly, but it seems like teaching is as good a start as any. Really, of all those, it's the most stable and achievable goal, but even then, teachers are underpaid and overworked. On the other hand, I went to college to study music, so clearly getting rich was never part of my master plan.

So in the end, I think I would like to be a teacher, but I have some doubts and concerns. However, I'm pretty sure I'll get over them, just like I'll eventually get over my bad sleeping habits when I have to wake up at 5 in the morning every day to go to work. And as a teacher, he would be in good company; He could answer teaching questions on Quora like those cool cats Dave Consiglio and Justin Franco.

I don't know if I'll think about it the same way tomorrow, but I think for today, at least, I would like to be a teacher when I graduate. I've just been convinced and I'm pretty sure everything will work out.

Also, as a teacher, I can be that guy who wears a different tie every day of the year. And that's what really matters.

People who teach don't usually do it for pay. If you want to teach, do it.

I'm not sure what country you're in, but in America the teacher education preparation process is too standardized, so it feels like a lot of roadblocks to go. There are the CBEST and the CSET, the RICA or the EdTPA, and they all cost money.

However, I felt fully prepared through my teacher training program and entered a program where I would graduate with a Master of Education. (Be sure to research the shows, they are not all the same.) The M.Ed. increases my salary $ 4,000, and my credential

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People who teach don't usually do it for pay. If you want to teach, do it.

I'm not sure what country you're in, but in America the teacher education preparation process is too standardized, so it feels like a lot of roadblocks to go. There are the CBEST and the CSET, the RICA or the EdTPA, and they all cost money.

However, I felt fully prepared through my teacher training program and entered a program where I would graduate with a Master of Education. (Be sure to research the shows, they are not all the same.) The M.Ed. it increases my salary by $ 4,000, and my credential is not yet approved, which will help my salary go up another thousand or two when it does. I am also adding a second credential in ELA which is much easier once you get the original credential; all you have to do is take a Methods class (it could be online) and pass the CSETs. This also adds more money to my general salary.

As a freshman teacher with a preliminary credential and nothing else, I started at 50k. This next year with my M.Ed. included, I'll be at 56k (because every year I teach I get a $ 1,000 raise as well). I also have a pension plan and more options to save on a 401k. You have to decide if that works for you.

I love teaching because every day, every period is different. You have the opportunity to be creative, to plan and most of the time you throw your plans out the window because you improvised with an unforeseen situation. I create good relationships with my students and we enjoy our time together.

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