What should I do if I discover that I am lost in my career path?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Thiago Reed



What should I do if I discover that I am lost in my career path?

It seems to me that you have chosen a career that now does not seem worth pursuing.

It all starts when parents still think of their children's career choice as something that children do once in their life at a certain age, say 18. By that time, they should already be what they want to be when they grow up. They are adults, so they should know.

This thought creates unnecessary anxiety. Parents (and children, that is, later us adults) see it as a critical decision: what they choose now will determine their future. This is no longer true and I doubt it was ever true for anyone. People who think about it

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It seems to me that you have chosen a career that now does not seem worth pursuing.

It all starts when parents still think of their children's career choice as something that children do once in their life at a certain age, say 18. By that time, they should already be what they want to be when they grow up. They are adults, so they should know.

This thought creates unnecessary anxiety. Parents (and children, that is, later us adults) see it as a critical decision: what they choose now will determine their future. This is no longer true and I doubt it was ever true for anyone. People who think it's still true believe it because that's all they know. In most cases, it is enough to think that something is true or false.

When contemplating any career, remember the following 2 rules that will help you break out of traditional thinking about our careers:

1. You can change careers at any age. At 16 or 18 years old (when you are about to choose your career for the first time) you have little or no experience and do not know what you are getting into. It's like choosing your food from a menu in a fancy restaurant - you can glance at other people's tables to see what they have ordered. Their dishes may look amazing, but until you try them for yourself, you will never know if it is something you will enjoy or not.

2. You can change careers despite the investment you have made so far. Obtaining an education and experience in a field takes time. Sometimes a lot.

You can't build a career without this investment, that's pretty obvious. But does it mean that you should stick with a career forever (one you don't enjoy) just because you've made an investment? Of course, no.
Let's go back to our restaurant analogy. You won't eat the food unless you ask for it, that is. Commit to pay at the end of your visit. Now, should you torture yourself eating this disgusting dish (cleaning the whole plate) just because you paid for it? No. Buy another or buy a loaf of bread instead and forget about the dish you didn't like.

Often times, people don't even think about changing careers because they've spent all those years getting to where they are now. The investment bias is against you. This bias tells you not to quit smoking, even if doing so would be objectively a good thing. It's a common thing in court cases (you've spent so much time, energy, and money fighting this bastard that if you quit now you'll lose this investment). They often think that the only way they can recoup some of this investment is to persist and hope the opponent loses and pays their expenses.
The same goes for education: now you want this job to pay you back.

People can get stuck just because they have this education: "I'm an investment banker. How can I do anything else?"
I had made the decision to go to law school and become a lawyer in high school, more than 15 years ago. I made that decision when I was young with no experience whatsoever, not knowing what I was getting into, argh! Fortunately, I was able to run away from him, I am a happy defector from the legal profession. This meant saying goodbye to almost 10 years of education in this field.

Instead of giving you the old advice to follow your passion, take a look at the following and see if you can think of a career where you have the skills to get the job done and you think fits most of the criteria.

We reviewed 60 studies on what constitutes a dream job. This is what we found.

1. Work that attracts

What really matters is not your salary, status, type of company, etc., but what you do day to day, hour to hour.

Attractive work is work that draws you in, holds your attention, and gives you a sense of fluidity.

2. Work that helps others

There is a growing body of evidence that he

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Instead of giving you the old advice to follow your passion, take a look at the following and see if you can think of a career where you have the skills to get the job done and you think fits most of the criteria.

We reviewed 60 studies on what constitutes a dream job. This is what we found.

1. Work that attracts

What really matters is not your salary, status, type of company, etc., but what you do day to day, hour to hour.

Attractive work is work that draws you in, holds your attention, and gives you a sense of fluidity.

2. Work that helps others

There is growing evidence that helping others is a key ingredient for life satisfaction. People who volunteer are less depressed and healthier. A randomized study showed that performing a random act of kindness makes the donor happier. And a global survey found that people who donate to charities are just as satisfied with their lives as those who earn double.

Helping others is not the only path to a meaningful career, but researchers widely accept that it is one of the most powerful.

3. Work you are good at

Being good at your job gives you a sense of accomplishment, a key ingredient of life satisfaction discovered by positive psychology.

It also gives you the power to negotiate the other components of a satisfying job, such as the ability to work on meaningful projects, get interesting assignments, and earn a fair salary. If people value your contribution, they can request these conditions in return.

For both reasons, skill ultimately trumps interest. Even if you love art, if you pursue it as a career but are not good at it, you will end up doing boring graphic design for companies that you don't care about.

That is not to say that you should only do work that you are already good at. However, you want to have the potential to get it right.

4. Work with support partners

When we think of dream jobs, we generally focus on the role. But who you work with is almost as important. A bad boss can ruin your dream position, while even boring work can be fun if you do it with a friend. So when selecting a job, will you be able to make friends with some people in the workplace? Most importantly, does the workplace culture facilitate getting help, feedback, and working together?

5. Lack of major negatives

To be satisfied, all of the above is important. But you also need the absence of things that make work unpleasant. All of the following tend to be related to job dissatisfaction.

  • A long journey, especially if it is more than an hour by bus.
  • Very long hours.
  • Paying what you feel is unfair.
  • Job insecurity.

6. Work that fits in with the rest of your life

You don't have to get all the ingredients of a fulfilling life from your job. It is possible to find a job that pays the bills and excel in a side project; or to find a sense of meaning through philanthropy or volunteering; or to build good relationships outside of work.

Personally I am a Business Analyst and I love doing what I do, here I have an article about what it means to be a BA for others. Alastair Majury on "What does it mean to you to be a BA?"

I found this thread on LinkedIn titled - "What does being a BA mean to you?"

The original post is:

What does it mean to you to be a BA?

As someone very passionate about what I do, I would like to read and know how you feel being a BA (including Data, Systems, Infrastructure,… Analysts).

Share your thoughts. "

And these are some of the answers:

“I think BAs are fortunate to have the opportunity to have a job where we help people understand and describe the problems they face, and then we help them find solutions. We work with many different types of people, mostly in collaborative settings, rather than stupidly competitive. We are also fortunate to work in an area where there is lifelong learning ”.

This one in particular resonates with myself:

“It is the breadth and variety of what we do (obtaining, facilitating, collaborating, listening, questioning, analyzing, planning, organizing, documenting, illustrating, communicating, presenting, tracking, tracing) and with whom we work (sponsors, businesses, Architects, Developers, Testers, Project Managers) that I enjoy the most.

1 - Work with the company to understand and describe the problem and what is to be achieved,
2 - Collaborate with SMEs, architects and other analysts to define a solution for the problem,
3 - Organize the requirements of the solution so that the development team can leverage them to build the solution and make sure the team has a clear understanding of the requirements, and
4 - Make sure the solution created meets the needs of the business.

I enjoy being the link between companies and developers. "

“I enjoy the essential arrogance that every business problem presents, the hermeneutical twist in model research, and the reification of aporia. When the client's full aporia materializes and becomes apparent to the client, I feel that my entire obligation to the client has been fulfilled. This is not a profession for doormats or dolls. "

“BA's work goes beyond requirements, facilities, collaboration, etc… we wear a lot of hats, depending on the need of the hour. The only piece missing so far is the code writing. But, I'm sure there are BAs out there who have done it too and tried it, just to be sure… :) ”

“As a BA, I have owned several hats. Requirement collector, facilitator, contributor, data analyst, developer, unit tester, and many others. It depends on the day and the client's need ”.

“Hello, if you are questioning the role of BA simply from an emotional / sentimental perspective, look at the role of someone who feels the pain of all parties impacted by a change, as well as all the players who make the change happen, feel the pain and has skills to balance it by providing rationale, information, illustrations, whatever is necessary to influence balanced decision making "

“We take an empty whiteboard and fill it with deliverables. Sometimes we deliver the goods. Other times, team members deliver the goods. We make sure that delivery is done according to best practices: well defined plans, validation tests, documentation, coordination between teams and stakeholders, and sometimes we make the product that is not so pretty at first more beautiful . Making delivery possible, orderly and orderly ".

There are many professional options, you will find something you enjoy!

If your approach isn't working, it might be time to change your perspective.

You will need to find out why you can't find a good job. You may want to find help polishing your profile or finding opportunities that are a better fit for you.
You can find help with a professional career coach. They can advise you on your job search, review / rewrite your resume to attract more recruiters, or go through the resume scan requests. They will also advise you on job application strategies - when to follow up, how to approach recruiters or talent managers for more details, and more.

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If your approach isn't working, it might be time to change your perspective.

You will need to find out why you can't find a good job. You may want to find help polishing your profile or finding opportunities that are a better fit for you.
You can find help with a professional career coach. They can advise you on your job search, review / rewrite your resume to attract more recruiters, or go through the resume scan requests. They will also advise you on job application strategies - when to follow up, how to approach recruiters or talent managers for more details, and more.

You may also want to see the big picture. What are the profiles of the people you compete with for the opportunities you are looking for? You can search for highly wanted positions and the value of the profiles is higher than yours. In this case, you may need to reduce your exceptions. Get experience elsewhere and advance your career path. Not everyone can join Google as a first experience, but travel doesn't stop if you don't.

Finally, try less conventional ways to find jobs, such as networking events. They may seem less efficient and in the short term they are. But in the long run, you may find great opportunities after you've made connections with people rather than connections on LinkedIn. We tend to overrate LinkedIn connections. They are great for keeping in touch with the people you know. They are not really made for building relationships.

I hope that helps.
Jordi

Some people say that if you feel like a job doesn't suit you or that you are dissatisfied or dissatisfied in some way, it's time to move on. However, I do not necessarily agree: a man must work. A job is the requirement of a man's life. We must work to support our family. It doesn't mean anything if we like our work or not. If we don't like it and can't get along with the boss, we should suppress our pride and ambition, bite the bullet, and keep playing. A man must work for the sugar in his tea. That is our destiny in life.

Well this is a complicated question but I will try to answer it. Some people are born knowing almost what they want to do and pursue it all their lives with enthusiasm, obviously with its ups and downs. And for most people, either nothing seems exciting for a long time or everything seems exciting (analysis paralysis).

I'm not suggesting you try things out there for some time and see what you like best as I'm pretty sure you would have done some of that. See that work is work, there is a reason you get paid for it. To enjoy you have to pay money out of your pocket. I do not say

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Well this is a complicated question but I will try to answer it. Some people are born knowing almost what they want to do and pursue it all their lives with enthusiasm, obviously with its ups and downs. And for most people, either nothing seems exciting for a long time or everything seems exciting (analysis paralysis).

I'm not suggesting you try things out there for some time and see what you like best as I'm pretty sure you would have done some of that. See that work is work, there is a reason you get paid for it. To enjoy you have to pay money out of your pocket. I am not saying that work cannot be an enjoyment, but you have to focus your mind to begin to feel the enjoyment of work.

Now for your question. Choose three areas that you like the most. And they should also make you earn money. So start looking at the pros and cons of each. And then dive into your best option and pursue it with full dedication for some time, at least a few years. Don't listen to anyone who says this is not exciting. That race should be the most exciting for you. If after a few years things don't work out. Go to route no. 2.

Remember that winners don't do different things, they do things differently.

Thanks.

Find something related to your passion (what you love and enjoy doing; something you can't get enough of; something you would do even without getting paid ... it can be one of your hobbies and interests; as long as it meets the Lo condition. I mentioned above).

Why? Because when we love what we do, we don't work a day in our life. It is like playing a sport or a game that we love and enjoy. Win or lose, we enjoy the game, right? When we play for the love of the game, we automatically win.

Our passion comes with built-in motivator and persistence, as we always want to be better ... and eventually we will.

Keep reading

Find something related to your passion (what you love and enjoy doing; something you can't get enough of; something you would do even without getting paid ... it can be one of your hobbies and interests; as long as it meets the Lo condition. I mentioned above).

Why? Because when we love what we do, we don't work a day in our life. It is like playing a sport or a game that we love and enjoy. Win or lose, we enjoy the game, right? When we play for the love of the game, we automatically win.

Our passion comes with a built in motivator and perseverance, as we always want to be better ... and eventually we will become one of the experts; that's where the money comes in. Good luck!

Do a job that you would do if you didn't have a job, now that job may not be paying you, the one you enjoy, find a way to monetize it.

Suppose you enjoy watching random tv or youtube videos, what value does that generate? zero? reduce… .. zero again? narrow it further, ... when you identify a skill bandwidth that generates enough value, let's say you are a good observer and watch stocks on TV, do a YouTube channel analysis for the same, be patient, it may take years start generating income.

Be good at whatever you do, don't do it all

For some people, many things seem fascinating until they try them and understand how difficult it is to be good at them. Many people are passionate about playing a musical instrument or drawing or anything else in life until they realize that it is difficult to do well enough. I am one of those people. I always think the grass is greener on the other side until I taste things.

Some people find that they are passionate about things that have never interested them. Many people don't want to be a programmer until they try. Once they get a taste of it, they realize it's fun and they get cool and

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For some people, many things seem fascinating until they try them and understand how difficult it is to be good at them. Many people are passionate about playing a musical instrument or drawing or anything else in life until they realize that it is difficult to do well enough. I am one of those people. I always think the grass is greener on the other side until I taste things.

Some people find that they are passionate about things that have never interested them. Many people don't want to be a programmer until they try. Once they get a taste of it, they realize it's fun and they get good and passionate.

You don't do the things that you are passionate about. You do things and then you become passionate.

Do you discover what you want to do in your career? The human mind is a complicated place and it always keeps you on top of "why are you stuck"? Get the help of a coach and find out what you really want and how you can get there.

Find some problem in the world that needs to be solved and dedicate yourself to solving it. Hopefully the money will come.

Very few career "paths" remain. That means continuity of experience and work, and that is less and less likely with each passing decade. The exchange rate has been on the rise, automation is becoming increasingly competent and quick to implement, and labor arbitrage is here to stay. Any job you get that has a lot of repetitive tasks will likely see all those repetitive tasks disappear on a computer or abroad. What you need to do is prepare to continually learn and ...

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