What should be the answer to the question: "Are you happy with your work"?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Fabian Harris



What should be the answer to the question: "Are you happy with your work"?

The scenario you describe can be read in at least two ways. The senior director of the other company wonders:

  1. If you have aspirations beyond your current role, or
  2. If you are challenged enough to stay in your current position.

To me (based on how you are framing the background of the question), it appears that he was interested in considering you for the vacancy at his company.

In such situations, I think it is best to be frank and honest about your level of satisfaction. Being frank and honest will give the Senior Director the opportunity to ensure that his vacant position is lined up to override his frustrations, or he may acknowledge that the position in his position will frustrate him in a similar way to his current position.

In any case, it would be good to know before you waste time looking for your position.

Of course, you must be politically intelligent when talking about your frustrations or irritations; no one wants to hire a complainant or culprit. Be measured, practical and balanced when discussing the negative aspects of your current role; Strive to think of solutions and accept personal responsibility for your situation as well.

An ideal response might be "I am quite happy where I am, but I might be tempted to find a position / company that also does X, Y and Z ...".

I have worked for about 10 companies and they have interviewed me about 30 times and these are the most common.

"Tell us about you"

This should be a short and tall overview of the package you are selling. for example: you.

“I have been doing software development in all fields for almost 20 years. My first experience with the software was at the age of 12 looking and putting sprites in my room and I have loved it ever since. "

"Where do you see yourself in 5 years?"

"Sitting in your chair" <- this is a funny one that I used to joke about until I was really old. Now i say

"Doing the same things that I have always done and loved"

I generally

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I have worked for about 10 companies and they have interviewed me about 30 times and these are the most common.

"Tell us about you"

This should be a short and tall overview of the package you are selling. for example: you.

“I have been doing software development in all fields for almost 20 years. My first experience with the software was at the age of 12 looking and putting sprites in my room and I have loved it ever since. "

"Where do you see yourself in 5 years?"

"Sitting in your chair" <- this is a funny one that I used to joke about until I was really old. Now i say

"Doing the same things that I have always done and loved"

Usually I expand on this because I hate political nonsense in my field. I am constantly approached to be a software administrator, but tbh, that's not my bag. First, for every 10 engineering positions there is 1 managerial position. Second, the longer you're away from software, the more those skills will atrophy. I've seen it over and over with managers. I don't want to be that guy. Practical coding is a must. Technical leadership is as high as I want to be at this point in my career.

"What is your greatest weakness?"

A coworker bragged about this one and it works but it's not honest to me so I only used it once. It's pretty good, but I generally give the latter because it seems more genuine.

"I am relentless" <- also works as a fortress

My answer is to be frank. I will continue in my field in any way, whether you hire me or not. "I am weak with algorithms." I usually expand on this by saying that I have coded technical documents before, but do not invert binary trees during my daily activities. It's silly to think that. I have also written a TON of KPIs for dashboards.

"What is your greatest strength?"

"I'm relentless" <- again. It can also work as a weakness, but I try to avoid this canned answer.

I generally state that in my field, I have a proven track record of adaptability and stay ahead of the curve in terms of technology.

"Do you have any question for me?"

Depending on the rounds of interviews, ask at least one question about what they envision you doing at their company. You need an idea of ​​their expectations of you there.

Ask about your tech stack.

How old is the base code?

Are you agile? waterfall?

release cycles?

Anything to understand your daily activities.

If you are in round 2 or 3 of the interview process and they ask this question again, I would say that all of your questions were answered by (insert name of previous interviewers) and anything else will be answered once you look under the hood .

"Why our company?"

This I rarely see unless it is a startup. If you "REALLY" want this startup, I hope you see a future with it and say it as such. For example: This looks amazing, and I imagine you guys are going to be the greyhound bus super or something. I only got this question early in my career. Today, you have to introduce me to your company. I've seen it all. Startup, Fortune 5, and anywhere in between. If you are really senior and in high demand, this question is rarely asked.

Beyond these questions, there will be technical questions related to your field. I've seen some crazy questions when opening a job for the first time. Avoid interviews if the position has just been opened and the company is medium in size. They will ask some stupid questions that no one knows, and then back off once no one can answer them. Usually after a week, they'll set the bar a little lower. Unfortunately, they usually pass a person who was a near-perfect fit and settle for someone mediocre just to fill the seat.

Just my observations.

In this answer, you must play your cards well. Be a bit strategic in answering this, because if you've quit your previous job, it may have paid you well, or you may have had a satisfying exposure there. So why jump elsewhere? Because, even though you have all the skills to show that you are better every day at work, you may not have a job at the end of the interview session.

Hiring a new employee costs the company something. They will have to invest their time, money and efforts in training an employee for a new role. And if the role is a little challenging

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In this answer, you must play your cards well. Be a bit strategic in answering this, because if you've quit your previous job, it may have paid you well, or you may have had a satisfying exposure there. So why jump elsewhere? Because, even though you have all the skills to show that you are better every day at work, you may not have a job at the end of the interview session.

Hiring a new employee costs the company something. They will have to invest their time, money and efforts in training an employee for a new role. And if the role is challenging, it takes a little more time. Interviewers generally ask this question to find out your stability. If you have been unemployed for a while, prepare yourself as to what could be the legitimate reason for not being hired for a specific period of time.

Don't stutter if you're searching for a short time. Of course, no one would want an employee who leaves responsibilities halfway. Well, interviewers are not interested in finding out about your personal affairs in the time frame that you are looking for. By asking this question, they just want to know that the amount of time they invest in training you will be worth it or not. If you intend to leave in months, perhaps during a crucial time, they won't want to waste your efforts training another employee in a short period of time.

Everyone knows that plans are volatile, they differ depending on the time and the situation. Don't leave a bad impression by stating a specific time.

Be a bit discreet and answer that "as long as you see me constantly growing together with the company, I would like to work with you." Answering this will only show that you are career oriented and would like to grow with the company.

If you plan to move, tell them the truth. Honesty is the best policy.

Tell them how impressed you are with the job profile and let them know that as long as you can contribute to the company, you will stay with them. Interviewers look for dedication and stability in this question.

Talk about how you love this role to try harder and are eager to work with them.

Good luck and hope the ideas above help you solve this question.

This is an HR trap, buddy. Either a direct YES or NO can create a negative image of you. You must be sincere enough to deal with such a situation. This loyalty check can be nailed for DIPLOMATISM… yes, sometimes it is good to be a diplomat to receive an offer with a good salary. Let's find out the consequences of saying yes or no:

If you say a direct 'yes' !!!

A sudden YES could reflect your blunt and blunt nature, which is not acceptable in the ruthless corporate environment. Negative marking is surely applicable to a direct yes and would be significant enough to say

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This is an HR trap, buddy. Either a direct YES or NO can create a negative image of you. You must be sincere enough to deal with such a situation. This loyalty check can be nailed for DIPLOMATISM… yes, sometimes it is good to be a diplomat to receive an offer with a good salary. Let's find out the consequences of saying yes or no:

If you say a direct 'yes' !!!

A sudden YES could reflect your blunt and blunt nature, which is not acceptable in the ruthless corporate environment. The negative score is surely applicable to a direct yes and would be significant enough to disqualify you for subsequent rounds. So there is a direct yes to this question.

What happens if you say 'no'?

If your answer is going to be NO, then it could give the impression that you are lying to get this job. With the image of a liar, it would be difficult for you to appear in front of the bosses in the following rounds. Of course, HR staff will highlight 'your no' on your resume before it reaches the respective department.

What should be your ideal version of this?

Ideally, your response should be like “First, I will explore the information on the opportunity to find out the results of joining. Everyone loves the comfort zone and once I start to feel comfortable here, it will be difficult for me to change my allegiance and compromise my comfort level. Comfort in terms of the cordial relationship with my colleagues, not finding comfort in my tasks.

I just love challenging tasks. To be honest, I'll try to seek the advice of my college seniors and seniors in my family. If the opportunity fits all, I will definitely disclose the same to my reporting manager and hope their employee retention policies are reasonable enough to keep my job with this organization. "

It worked in my case. Hope it helps you too.

The work in which you feel in a state of resonance is probably the work that will make you happy inside.

Now before I move on to another answer, let me explain the term resonance to you.

It is the quality of a sound to be deep, full and reverberant. A task where you want to put your best effort and while doing it your energy is at the top. And, a good point is that under this state a person never feels tired and bored.

I have some examples to back this up,

Popularly known as Tabla Master, Ustad Zakir Hussain has truly left his indelible mark on the field of music an

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The work in which you feel in a state of resonance is probably the work that will make you happy inside.

Now before I move on to another answer, let me explain the term resonance to you.

It is the quality of a sound to be deep, full and reverberant. A task where you want to put your best effort and while doing it your energy is at the top. And, a good point is that under this state a person never feels tired and bored.

I have some examples to back this up,

Popularly known as Tabla Maestro, Ustad Zakir Hussain has truly made his indelible mark in the field of music and has also gained international recognition. A true legend, his music will continue to captivate us for many years to come.

Do you think he ever got tired of playing tabla?

Look here..

Yes, none other than Michael Jackson, the world remembers his dance.

Have you ever found him dancing with less energy?

A programmer programming ...

A singer singing ..

A painter painting ...

A teacher dedicated to teaching ...

Players playing ...

So all these people are very focused on their career and they never get tired or bored of it. They are in a state of resonance while doing their work. And the reason behind this state is quite simple: they enjoy what they do. They know what they are good at and are happy to do so. And happiness is a state in which a person wants to stay forever. This is the reason why they never feel pierced. So you see how everything is interconnected in this world.

Now, you are the one who must wonder if you are capable of achieving such kind of satisfaction and happiness (as the people above) while doing your job or not. Accordingly, decide your career.

I hope I have justified the question.

Good luck :-)

Unlike many people, I took civil engineering not because I had no other choice, I took it because I wanted to. I was lucky to get a job in the main sector just one month after graduation in my hometown.

On my first day of work, I was very excited. After a short briefing in the office, I was asked to come to the site. The company I work for makes green buildings, which I have always found interesting.

My job is to supervise everything that happens on that site.

My first day turned out to be the exact opposite of what I expected. Not only the people on the site don't

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Unlike many people, I took civil engineering not because I had no other choice, I took it because I wanted to. I was lucky to get a job in the main sector just one month after graduation in my hometown.

On my first day of work, I was very excited. After a short briefing in the office, I was asked to come to the site. The company I work for makes green buildings, which I have always found interesting.

My job is to supervise everything that happens on that site.

My first day turned out to be the exact opposite of what I expected. The people on the site not only didn't listen to me, they completely ignored my existence. Even though I'm 23, I hardly look 18. That didn't help. There are times when few of the workers used to sing weird songs when I was around. I was the only girl (I'm still) working on the site. Sometimes it was scary. Every day I came home and contemplated the day I took civilization. Perhaps people were right, civilized is not actually for girls.

There are nets that are tied up on the lower levels of the work, so that if someone wants to dump something from the upper floors (mainly garbage), they do not have to go down all the time. They can do it by the highest lever without anyone getting hurt. Networks look like this.

For whatever reason, these nets cannot be tied on both sides. So all they had to do was turn around, walk a few steps, and throw it to the other side. They did not.

My lowest point came when one of the consultants who came to our site got injured. Someone threw a brick from the upper floor. Fortunately, it landed on his feet and not on his head.

It was my complete failure to manage the site that led to this. I felt like a loser.

They stopped for a week or two and then started again.

One day when he was on a round, the same thing happened to him. A brick landed just millimeters from my feet. That was it. I have already done it.

I went straight up to that floor, found out who the job was, went to his contractor, and he got fired. He was surprised. He didn't expect me to do that. The boy just fired him. In 1 hour I received your release papers from the office. He begged me to give him one more chance and why am I punishing all the jobs working for him for only one of the jobs he was at fault, I didn't budge. I knew that if I gave it a chance, sooner or later I would regret it.

After everything was done, I went to the bathroom and stayed there. I still couldn't believe it. I had always been bad at confrontation, never been able to do it in 23 years. But here I was, just 3 months after my job I had fired someone. I was out of my comfort zone and it didn't kill me.

Things changed after that. People on my site know that if I say something I mean it. I knew they still didn't like me, but I knew they respected me.

Nine months later, I can proudly say that I am happy with my work. It's not because of the money I'm getting, it's because it forces me out of my sweet little comfort zone every day. I meet a variety of people and learn something new every day. I have learned not to treat people differently because of their profession or gender, but to treat them like human beings, and most of the time they will return the favor.

At the end of each month, I give my entire paycheck to my mother (although I'm pretty sure she deposits the full amount into my account). The feeling of pride on his face makes me the happiest person in the world at that moment.

And it turns out that civil engineering is a good career choice for girls too!

I know that is a very long answer. Thanks for reading it to the end!

Your answers should at least be honest.

You should answer this question as if you were answering yourself, not someone else. You should not try to impress the interviewer by exaggerating or exaggerating the existing facts. Stay away from generic facts. Naturally, you must have done your research on the organization, have assessed its suitability for the job and the culture of the organization.

Remember to be enthusiastic, dynamic, attractive, and highly motivated. But in the process, don't try to be what you really are not. This is only possible if you have nothing to hide. Ev

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Your answers should at least be honest.

You should answer this question as if you were answering yourself, not someone else. You should not try to impress the interviewer by exaggerating or exaggerating the existing facts. Stay away from generic facts. Naturally, you must have done your research on the organization, have assessed its suitability for the job and the culture of the organization.

Remember to be enthusiastic, dynamic, attractive, and highly motivated. But in the process, don't try to be what you really are not. This is only possible if you have nothing to hide. Even if you hide something, it is more likely to come out during the preparation process, the organization behaves towards you during the hiring process.

The manager wants to find out if the applicant really wants this position. She also wants to determine if she is simply looking for a previous job, running from a bad situation at her current employer, only worries about compensation, or if she is selfishly desirous of the prestige associated with having the company name on her resume and LinkedIn profile. . .

You should share specific details of how your background, experience, talents, interests, education, and other attributes make you a great candidate for the job and company asset. Respond by adding that you will be challenged intellectually and given the opportunity to grow your career while creating value for the organization. Provide strong reasons why the company appeals to you, including corporate culture, your reputation, the ability to move forward, and any other valid details of why you would like to work there.

Sometimes there are certain negative factors in the potential organization, you can point them out and explain how the attributes and experience you have can help the organization overcome the challenge. If you can corroborate the same with instances of your experience, they will not only be convinced by your narration, but they will be impressed with your frankness and honesty.

The interview is not just to get a job, it is way beyond that. Once you create a permanent imprint on the interviewer's mind about your honesty, candor, and your results, he or she can recommend you to friends at some other organization.

And such recommendations carry a lot of weight and value.

Best wishes,

Please read my related article on

First, don't be put off by this question. I have seen many HR companies use this as a tactic, mentioning the many applicants they are considering, when the reality is that they have none. What the employer wants is for you to answer the question that you currently cannot. Why should they hire you?

Here's a mad libs script, edit it however you like.

"While I am not aware of the skills of the other candidates you are considering, I believe that my ability at _____ will benefit you at _______."

Follow up with a good example of how you've accomplished that goal. If you've done your research, you can try:

"I see you

Keep reading

First, don't be put off by this question. I have seen many HR companies use this as a tactic, mentioning the many applicants they are considering, when the reality is that they have none. What the employer wants is for you to answer the question that you currently cannot. Why should they hire you?

Here's a mad libs script, edit it however you like.

"While I am not aware of the skills of the other candidates you are considering, I believe that my ability at _____ will benefit you at _______."

Follow up with a good example of how you've accomplished that goal. If you've done your research, you can try:

“I see that you need _______, and in my experience doing _________ I was able to achieve _________ for a recent employer. "

If you've really delved deeper, maybe you'll also talk about your core values. And show how you can align with them and help them achieve their goals.

It is a vague answer because the interviewer asks a vague question.

Employers don't particularly care about happiness. They care about productivity, above all, and about retaining good employees. They will raise the alarm if an employee is determined to be unproductive, rendering others unproductive, or at risk of flight.

If your manager asks you "are you happy?" this is a red flag for you. It probably means your attitude sucks and has been noticed by others. That they are drawing your attention is actually a good sign.

Although the most honest answer might be: “I hate this place. You're overcharging me, paying me badly, and right now I'm not

Keep reading

Employers don't particularly care about happiness. They care about productivity, above all, and about retaining good employees. They will raise the alarm if an employee is determined to be unproductive, rendering others unproductive, or at risk of flight.

If your manager asks you "are you happy?" this is a red flag for you. It probably means your attitude sucks and has been noticed by others. That they are drawing your attention is actually a good sign.

Although the most honest answer might be: “I hate this place. You're overworking me, you're paying me badly, and right now I'm not hiding it well ”, this is not the answer you should offer if you want to keep control of the narrative. This level of honesty will mark you as a problem and will put you at the top of the list the next time they need RIFF people. It can even earn you a PIP.

The answer they are looking for here is: “I've probably been a bit off my game lately. There are some personal stressors that I have been dealing with, and if this manifests itself at work, I apologize. I would appreciate any comments you have made that help me become more aware of what I am projecting at this time. "

At this point, your manager will likely tell you to smile more, stop complaining to your toxic coworker, and stay a few minutes after 5pm every now and then.

Meanwhile, while you work to better fake your happiness at the office, you should be in the background working quietly to find another job. If no one wants to hire you, then consider being really happy with your current work situation.

Yes, you are happy.

Is there any reason not to be happy in this world? No, nature gave us many things to be happy and have a big and beautiful smile on our faces.

Nobody in this world is unhappy, if you tell me "I am unhappy", my answer would be "You are not satisfied with your life, you are not unhappy". So, feel satisfied with yourself.

How about “No one else would hire me” or “I applied to 247 companies, you are my 57th interview. " Ha ha.

Oh, was it a serious question?

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