What's the scariest Steve Jobs story?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Lee Reese



What's the scariest Steve Jobs story?

Steve Jobs had a son with Chrisann Brennan, named Lisa. As Lisa grew up, Jobs rarely saw her, offered little support of any kind, and practically denied being the biological father. When Walter Isaacson interviewed him about this (for his excellent biography), Steve said something ruefully: "He didn't want to be a father, so he wasn't."

I'm not sure the reality distortion field extends to disrupt DNA.

This man was a horrible human being and too many people allowed him. I'm pretty sure he was a sociopath and fits the DSM V description. He was only nice to someone when he wanted something from them and was trying to manipulate them. His grandeur was unbelievable and on the contrary, Bill Gates, while not an angel, had never been the type to talk much about wanting to make a dent in history and was a hermit compared to Jobs in the 80s and 90s. ( Bill Gates gave a tech talk to kids about Nickolodeon back then. Jobs never showed any interest in kids or charity in his life, ever since

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This man was a horrible human being and too many people allowed him. I'm pretty sure he was a sociopath and fits the DSM V description. He was only nice to someone when he wanted something from them and was trying to manipulate them. His grandeur was unbelievable and on the contrary, Bill Gates, while not an angel, had never been the type to talk much about wanting to make a dent in history and was a hermit compared to Jobs in the 80s and 90s. ( Bill Gates gave a tech talk to kids about Nickolodeon back then. Jobs never showed any interest in kids or charity in his life, as it wouldn't just stand out for him to talk about his genius, as he did at conventions) .

He cared for no one but himself and frankly, he would tell anyone who knows where his remains are to unbutton his shorts and "fertilize" his grave. Justice would be delayed; Frankly, I'm amazed that no one at Apple finally broke up, gathered a group, slammed their office door behind them, and savagely beat him to the point where he was in a wheelchair, to the level of Stephen Hawking disabled. (I know the words are harsh, but he really was that evil. Let me prove it).

He would not acknowledge that his daughter was his until a DNA test and court order forced him to pay alimony. While his daughter and mother were impoverished, he was living the good life with expensive cars and everything he wanted with a snap of the fingers. He didn't even bother to see her. At one point she moved in with him, but he never held her or paid attention to her and when she asked for a goodnight kiss, they just laughed at her.

He claimed that those who worked for him "were not used to working in an environment of excellence," but the more important truth is that the environment he created at Apple was more like a ship full of kitchen slaves. People suffered from nervous breakdowns and heart attacks. According to the man himself, the world could be divided between the A levels and the bozos. Only one guy was welcome at Apple. If you had two teams where one wasn't delivering what you wanted, well, Incredibles Jack Jack had fewer tantrums and would crush his self-esteem to dust. He treated people more like robots than human beings. These people were rarely allowed to go HOME and making grown men cry didn't hurt Jobs. (I wouldn't be surprised if when one of his subordinates finally drank a bottle of aspirin,

His hypocrisy knew no bounds, considering that he STOLE the technology and ideas to start Apple from Xerox and the idiot never understood that he would have been nothing without Wozniak. People LIKED Woz's wizard. Steve even screwed Wozniak when he tricked him into designing a video game ... and Jobs took all the money. Wozniak did most of the groundwork for early Apple models, but STEVE took the credit. The shockingly horrible truth is that Steve Jobs, a man old enough to remember Bozo the Clown but not wise enough to realize that his engineers were probably laughing at him for continuing to use the archaic term, hadn't programmed anything since. early 1970s when he died. I did not know Python. Some form of C and its derivatives? JavaScript: why? You probably knew BASIC and ASCII. (For those who doubt me, think:

It would also mean that if he held to the same unrealistic standards as the ones he whipped like mules, he wouldn't have been able to get hired by Apple, as his qualifications would be pretty outdated. He stated that he only wanted excellence-BULLSHIT. He hired people far more qualified and talented than himself to do his dirty work, and he sucked their blood like a leech. Steve Jobs did not invent the iPod. Its engineers did. They never got credit.

This man deserves to be exposed for who he really was and presented as a warning of a cruel and abusive man who was allowed too much power and influence. He may have built a billion dollar empire, but he ruined many lives to get there. Lisa Brennan-Jobs deserved to have a caring father. Woz deserved to be hailed as a genius. Creators of all treats in the past 20 years must receive credit.

The time he dismissed the top executives of America's largest wireless firms with disdain.

This was told to me by my mentor at the management consulting firm I worked for in Boston a few years ago (The Cambridge Strategic Management Group, CSMG).

As strategic experts in the field of wireless technology, my company was hired by Apple Inc. to advise them a few months before at the crucial moment when they released the first iPhone in 2007.

The core of our work was analyzing which wireless companies they should partner with. The main targets in America were the two largest wireless c

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The time he dismissed the top executives of America's largest wireless firms with disdain.

This was told to me by my mentor at the management consulting firm I worked for in Boston a few years ago (The Cambridge Strategic Management Group, CSMG).

As strategic experts in the field of wireless technology, my company was hired by Apple Inc. to advise them a few months before at the crucial moment when they released the first iPhone in 2007.

The core of our work was analyzing which wireless companies they should partner with. The main targets in the United States were the two largest wireless carriers that together had between 60% and 65% of the postpaid market share: Verizon and AT&T (first approached Verizon, but did not like Apple terms on demand, so AT&T was ultimately chosen as a partner).

Now I was not part of that project, but my mentor was, and he was leading the team together with a senior partner from the firm. He is currently a senior executive at Apple Inc. in Cupertino.

He was present in the room when Apple was at the negotiating table with the C-level executives of some of the largest wireless firms in the world.

And he tells me that the heads of wireless networks started talking about how they differentiated their networks. That each of their companies was 'special' in one way or another, rather than just 'dumb pipes' (as we called it in the trade) that carried voice and data, similar to what electric, gas or power companies do. public services.

The big dogs of AT&T, Vodafone (which owned Verizon) and Sprint were all sitting in the room when Jobs declared this as a bloody boss (and I'm not quoting him verbatim here, but rather summarizing the gist of what he said in relation to me later by my mentor who was sitting at the table)

"Let's be realistic. Your companies are mere conduits that transmit voice and data.

Enough with this "We are special" talk.

No, you guys HAVE NO IDEA about the type of device we have made here.

It will shock and shake the entire sector as you will not believe. "

And boy was he right!

And no, the wireless executives had yet to see the iPhone at the time.

My mentor later told me that only a man with balls the size of Jobs would have the recklessness to speak so callously to the heads of some of the most powerful corporations on the planet.

Later I would tell my company that I was satisfied enough with the work we did that we should have charged Apple more money. (We were paid just a couple million dollars for our work, which was honestly a dumb change for Jobs and Apple.)

Jobs and other Apple executives were satisfied enough with the work my company had done that several of my former co-workers were hired as Apple Inc. executives in its strategy department.


You know, despite how popular the iPhone is as a device, most people have no idea how it revolutionized power dynamics in the wireless ecosystem, especially in the US.

Until then, it was the wireless network providers (Verizon, AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile) who made the decisions. They could just decide not to offer a certain phone on their network and the device manufacturer was in big trouble. Even giants like Nokia did not dare to take the bad side.

Wireless giants like Verizon and AT&T had a suffocating bottleneck in the wireless apps space, charging consumers exorbitant prices while paying app developers even half the revenue share. Resulting in low supply and demand.

Apple turned that power equation completely upside down in the US market by giving app developers a 'real' 70% share of revenue, thus completely breaking that entire paradigm with the strength of a device. It has to go pound for pound as one of the most disruptive events in terms of power dynamics in the history of not only the world of technology but of any line of business.

If you have a large number of hundreds of thousands of apps today, now you know who to thank for that.

Whether you like or like Jobs as a person, you simply have to be amazed by both the man's influence and his level of confidence.

I imagine the man had his pants tailored to fit balls that size.

Andy Cunningham served as Steve Jobs' communications consultant, beginning in 1983, for the launch of the first Apple Macintosh computer, and remained throughout his departure from Apple and was reborn with his second company, NeXT.

He spoke about working with Steve Jobs at a PRSA event in Palo Alto, CA on Tuesday, October 17, 2017.

In Andy's words:

“He was so compelling with his vision. As soon as it came in, you were on. It was exhausting. They were testing you every minute of every day. But if he passed 80% of those tests, he could stay and if he didn't get 80%, he was out.

"The greatest joy of working

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Andy Cunningham served as Steve Jobs' communications consultant, beginning in 1983, for the launch of the first Apple Macintosh computer, and remained throughout his departure from Apple and was reborn with his second company, NeXT.

He spoke about working with Steve Jobs at a PRSA event in Palo Alto, CA on Tuesday, October 17, 2017.

In Andy's words:

“He was so compelling with his vision. As soon as it came in, you were on. It was exhausting. They were testing you every minute of every day. But if he passed 80% of those tests, he could stay and if he didn't get 80%, he was out.

“The greatest joy about working with Steve Jobs was that his agenda in life was clearly to change the world. He had no other interests. Money did not matter to him. Power didn't matter to him and women didn't matter to him. As a member of your team, it was very rewarding to work in that kind of environment. Even though it was challenging and difficult, it was very refreshing.

“The main thing I learned from Steve was this notion of everything that is high quality. It was about quality, regardless of whether it was the stair you were putting into a building, the color of the pixels on the screen, or the actual words on the paper ... it had to be exact and perfect. I learned a lot about the quality of him and about the environment. He really liked creating an environment where people wanted to work.

“If you ever visited the Macintosh building at Apple with the pirate flag, the offices were outside and in the middle was a piano, which he didn't play by the way. He put it there on purpose for people to meet, create, play and be creative.

“Under Steve Jobs, Apple was a missionary company. They wanted to change the fundamental behavior of human nature.

“Apple is going through a genetic change, not because of a conscious change, but because of what happened to Steve Jobs. With his passing, he handed over the keys to an amazing steward of the assets he created. Tim Cook has done a godly job of taking the assets they gave him and making them even more valuable and Apple an even bigger company. But what he has not been able to do is maintain that missionary status. So the company is moving from a missionary state to a more mechanical state. With that change, they will have to pay much more attention to their products. This happened recently with your batteries, something like that will not be tolerated in your new environment. We used to tolerate things like that from Apple because it was cool to buy Apple products. You felt that you were part of this movement to change the world. But if you are only going to buy another product,

Andy Cunningham, PR Pro who worked with Steve Jobs

Photo credit: Christopher Michel

  • The Lisa, which was the first major computer to use a GUI (before the Macintosh) was overpriced and did not sell well. Much of the unsold inventory ended up buried in a hole in Nevada.
  • The Macintosh, despite initial launch success and hype, did not meet sales expectations due to stiff pricing competition from IBM. Eventually, this led to his demotion and leaving Apple to start NeXT.
  • While the NeXT family of workstations had very high-performance specifications, they were priced too high for anyone except investment banks and intelligence agencies to buy in bulk, and the
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  • The Lisa, which was the first major computer to use a GUI (before the Macintosh) was overpriced and did not sell well. Much of the unsold inventory ended up buried in a hole in Nevada.
  • The Macintosh, despite initial launch success and hype, did not meet sales expectations due to stiff pricing competition from IBM. Eventually, this led to his demotion and leaving Apple to start NeXT.
  • While the NeXT family of workstations had very high performance specs, they were priced too high for anyone except investment banks and intelligence agencies to buy in quantity, and the hardware line eventually failed, to even though he had investment money from Ross Perot and Canon.
  • While with NeXT, Steve Jobs did not control prices well due to his unwavering commitment to the best. The cardboard boxes used to ship the NeXT workstations were rumored to require special inks and paper to print / make and cost $ 200 each.
  • While at NeXT, Steve experimented with advertising everyone's salary and only has two pay grades. This is not functional.
  • After having its own factory and custom hardware, NeXT eventually had to abandon hardware manufacturing, and NeXT focused on porting its OPENSTEP software to Intel and Sun architecture servers.
  • NeXT never made a profit until it was bought by Apple in late 1996.
  • Steve Jobs didn't have a great core team to help him on NeXT except for Avie Tevanian (who later built OS X at Apple) and Jon Rubinstein (who worked on the iPhone and then went to Palm, HP).


The great thing about Steve Jobs is that he made all of his mistakes early in his career and, more importantly, he learned from them. His willingness to learn from his mistakes set the stage for his tremendous success at Apple.

Jobs had formed a club at Homestead High to do
light and music shows and jokes too. (They
once glued a gold-painted toilet seat to a
flower pot.) It was called the Buck Fry Club, a play
named after the director. Although they had already
graduated, Wozniak and his friend Allen Baum joined
forces with Jobs, at the end of their junior year, to
produce a farewell gesture for the leaving seniors.
Showing the Homestead campus four decades later,
Jobs paused at the getaway scene and pointed.
"Do you see that balcony? That's where we did
the banner prank that was

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Jobs had formed a club at Homestead High to do
light and music shows and jokes too. (They
once glued a gold-painted toilet seat to a
flower pot.) It was called the Buck Fry Club, a play
named after the director. Although they had already
graduated, Wozniak and his friend Allen Baum joined
forces with Jobs, at the end of their junior year, to
produce a farewell gesture for the leaving seniors.
Showing the Homestead campus four decades later,
Jobs paused at the getaway scene and pointed.
"Do you see that balcony? That's where we did the
banner prank that sealed our friendship. "On a large sheet,
Baum had dyed in the school colors green and white.
colors, they painted a huge hand waving the
middle finger salute. Baum's kind Jewish mother helped them
draw it and showed them how to make the
shadows to make it look more real. "I know what that is,"
he snickered. They devised a system of ropes and
pulleys so that it could be lowered dramatically as the
graduating class passed through the balcony, and they
signed it "SWAB JOB," the initials for Wozniak and Baum
combined with part of Jobs' name. The joke became
part of school tradition and got Jobs to fail
once again.

From Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson

Here's a link to the image on the web:

Steve Jobs understood how humans react. He literally believed that people are heritably stupid. This is reflected in the same quotes he said:

"We don't do market research. People don't know what they want until we tell them."

"We are
not driven by people's expectations. We design products that drive people's expectations."

Steve Jobs knew how the market works, he knew that if one smart person has something and is able to describe how useful it is to him, another 100 will want it even if it doesn't serve their purpose. He was the best salesman of all time.

His methodology can be seen very clearly in India.

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Steve Jobs understood how humans react. He literally believed that people are heritably stupid. This is reflected in the same quotes he said:

"We don't do market research. People don't know what they want until we tell them."

"We are
not driven by people's expectations. We design products that drive people's expectations."

Steve Jobs knew how the market works, he knew that if one smart person has something and is able to describe how useful it is to him, another 100 will want it even if it doesn't serve their purpose. He was the best salesman of all time.

His methodology can be seen very clearly in the Indian Ashrams, where lagoons of innocent people are deceived for life with the promise of obtaining something that others will not get (coincidentally, Jobs also spent a good part of his time in the Indian Ashrams):

1. Tell people that what you are offering is something very special.
Even if it's normal, market it as 'reinvented'. Describe it with superfluous adjectives.

2. People care about appearance.
Pay attention to the fine details of the appearance. It doesn't matter if it works or not (death grip incident, no file manager, no BT, no memory card slot ... Even after paying a leg and an arm), but make it attractive. People will advertise it by word of mouth if it looks good, regardless of how functional it really is.
Basic psychology that guys want that sexiest girl in college. Girls want that handsome and tough guy. Nobody cares about the heart at first sight.
People want to show off. That is your sweet spot. Explain it.

3. People want to feel special. Everybody wants to feel superior, be it Hitler or ordinary Joe.
So, make them feel special. Naming different products (ideology of "thinking differently" at work). iMac, iPhone ... Make simple things seem special (like hallucinations. Jobs used LSD in the early years, so he knew what people want to see in normal things).

4. Tell people that others are jealous of them because they can't have it.
Even if the other person is right, shut up by labeling them jealous. Call it poor. Call it weak. This will set you apart from them. You will feel superior and it will also save you from the debate that you would have lost if you had not used this tactic.
(Remember Jobs's response when asked about phablets? This was: "They're stupid. Who would want them? They're like the Hummer on cell phones. Insult him if you can't convince him."

This is the most important step. In the ashrams people are taught that if someone questions their faith, tell them that they cannot feel what they have because they do not have it.
Even when they haven't felt anything. Even if they regret their decisions, people will tell. Why ? Because this makes them superior to others. They have something that others do not have.

5. Make it unaffordable. Make it hard to get.
This is the truth of life. The harder the goal, the more pleasure in achieving it.
This strategy of overpricing works for them. People buy it, dopamine is released and they feel special. They want it not because the product is useful in their work, but because it sets them apart from everyone who can't afford it, even when everyone else has a better functional phone for half the price.

The recently released adapter for MacBook (2015 edition) costs the same as the MotoG mobile phone at Verizon. Imagine how rich a person would feel showing an adapter that costs more than the other person's mobile phone. Imagine feeling special when people envy you. That's the trick mate.

6. Make the brand name impenetrable to any accusation. Make the name so strong that it becomes a reason to add value to the product.
Do you need a similar example? Have you ever heard of this: "... because I'm Batman." Yes! Right. Say it in the voice of Christian Bale.

Apple is the Batman of the tech world. You will not fail at anything. Dell XPS 13 (2015 Edition) is available for $ 800 and has a better resolution than the new MacBook, which is around $ 1,300. It has more ports. It has exactly the same dimensions. It has no bezels around the screen (very very thin). It looks incredibly sexy, but apparently only Apple has 'reinvented' the laptop this year.
Why ? "Because it's Apple!" Again! Christian Bale's voice
Don't tell me you've never heard this argument: "An iPhone is a dear iPhone. You won't understand."

Others have also given many excellent answers. Apple blocks its users with its services, short and solid wallet, etc. All is true. I have responded from the perspective of human psychology by highlighting a different hidden aspect of Apple that goes unnoticed many times but has always played a large role in its success.
This is not to say that Apple does not make good products. They do. I agree, but it is not worth the price it asks or the infallible aura with which people crown them.

I hate the game they play with us. I hate how they use people as sheep following any hot trend and I hate how people, even after knowing everything, let Ashrams and Apple play with them.


Edit 1: Few people seem to have taken this as a criticism of Apple products. 6 points and all the focus on how Dell XPS 13 is better than MacBook. For them:

http: //m.windowscentral.com/quic ...

The focus of the answer is not Apple and its products. It is about the role of the public and their perception of a company like Apple in its success and how Apple (mainly Jobs) has always "created a desire" for its products among people.
Furthermore, the word 'ashrams' refers to all those sects of religions that deceive innocents. It does not pretend to generalize all ashrams. Although the examples given here have been personally witnessed by me in a very famous Ashram with a 'clean image'.

Yes, Steve Jobs was mean to me!
Sure, he and his company got exceptional devices that no one else can beat like the iPhone, Macbook, or iPod, but they priced them too high for me to crush my dream of owning them all!


Image Source: Google

Look at the comparison between the price of an iPhone and that of an average Android device that I own. In my country, India, it is about 4 times! How can anyone be so bad?

PS- Anyway, Steve is still my hero.

Yes ... It all depends on how you perceive it. For many people in education he is a bit of a hero, with the pressure he has put in for computers to enter the educational climate. For others, like me, he is more of a villain. Charging as much as Apple does for computers that are scheduled for obsolescence is an evil act.

One lesson people should have learned from him is how to deal with technology at home. As in: Limited use only!

Steve Jobs worked at Atari Inc. (an arcade video game company), he was assigned to design a circuit board for an arcade game Breakout. Atari offered $ 100 to reduce each of the existing design. Steve Jobs took the help of Steve Wozniak (co-founder of Apple) to make the circuit board, as he had little knowledge of electronic design. Wozniak designed the circuit very efficiently and reduced the number of chips by 50. Jobs told Wozniak that Atari gave them only $ 700, so his share was $ 350. Steve Wozniak didn't find out about the actual bonus until 10 years, he also said that if Jobs had asked

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Steve Jobs worked at Atari Inc. (an arcade video game company), he was assigned to design a circuit board for an arcade game Breakout. Atari offered $ 100 to reduce each of the existing design. Steve Jobs took the help of Steve Wozniak (co-founder of Apple) to make the circuit board, as he had little knowledge of electronic design. Wozniak designed the circuit very efficiently and reduced the number of chips by 50. Jobs told Wozniak that Atari gave them only $ 700, so his share was $ 350. Steve Wozniak didn't find out about the actual bonus until 10 years, he also said that if Jobs had asked him that he needed the money, he would have given it to him.

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