What's the most disgusting business tactic you've ever seen?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Aron Sykes



What's the most disgusting business tactic you've ever seen?

I wouldn't call it so much a tactic as a complete strategy.

For those of you who haven't heard of SquareTrade, it is the largest provider of electronics insurance policies and a subsidiary of Allstate. 1, or more accurately my parents, bought a warranty for my SquareTrade laptop.

After about a year and a half, my brother opened the trunk of the car and my backpack fell out of the car onto the concrete pavement. Unfortunately my laptop was in the front so it got crushed between the weight of all the books and the pavement; it was a complete accident, but my laptop was totally

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I wouldn't call it so much a tactic as a complete strategy.

For those of you who haven't heard of SquareTrade, it is the largest provider of electronics insurance policies and a subsidiary of Allstate. 1, or more accurately my parents, bought a warranty for my SquareTrade laptop.

After about a year and a half, my brother opened the trunk of the car and my backpack fell out of the car onto the concrete pavement. Unfortunately my laptop was in the front so it got crushed between the weight of all the books and the pavement; it was a complete accident, but my laptop was totally ruined.

So we filed a claim with SquareTrade and were asked to send it to them so they could repair it. We did what we were instructed to do, and I checked my "repaired" laptop about a week later, "repaired" because it was by no means actually repaired; They had replaced the entire chassis (with a chassis that didn't even have the same body as my laptop model - it was three years old), but they hadn't bothered to fix the broken screen or trackpad. I told my dad this and he decided that we should call them, and that's how the adventure began ...

My dad called them for the first time at a relatively reasonable time of night on a business day, and he was immediately sent to an overseas call center, which is obviously nothing out of the ordinary. What was unusual was the sophistication of the call center; the “customer service representatives,” as they called themselves, could barely speak English, or at least the former couldn't, so my dad quickly asked to speak to his manager. You would think that when a customer asks to speak to their manager, they would immediately go find the manager, but it was not like that at all. Instead, he tries to argue with my dad and insist that he doesn't need to talk to a manger. And he does it for twenty minutes.

That pattern continued through four levels of management before my father finally spoke to someone in America who really had the authority to do anything, regardless of the ability to speak Engslih. However, even once I was talking to an American representative,

Eventually my dad reached a level that we now believe is just below the "executive escalation department" (just remember that name for now ...) and the rep agreed that if SquareTrade didn't fix the computer for a second, they would reimburse him. us the cost of the laptop in addition to the cost of the warranty. While my father was certainly not happy that I lost my laptop for another week, he recognized that it was the best deal we would probably get and so he took advantage of it. In particular, the representative we spoke to agreed to document our deal so that if it wasn't properly repaired again, we wouldn't have to go through the same process all over again.

And so, once again, my laptop went back to its "repair center", but before I continue, I want to describe one of the many shady tactics employed by SquareTrade. Since I am a student, my life more or less revolves around my laptop, so when I shipped it I was very curious if I would get it back. I looked at the prepaid shipping label they had provided me and saw that they were located in McAllen, Texas, which is directly on the southern border of the United States. I then examined the certificate of repair that had been included with the laptop and saw that the names of the three people involved were Mexican. One thing led to another and now I can say that I am pretty sure SquareTrade takes advantage of illegal immigrants; it works like this:

Anyway, I shipped the laptop at the time and this time, what I did was replace my perfectly fine charger with another one and reinstall the operating system; all the same problems were still present, and they had one more fixed basically nothing.

Once again, my father made his way through foreign call centers to speak to a representative in America, but I'm sure he's wondering why we weren't bought by the first person we spoke to. Well, in what would be comparatively nothing, they denied that we had made a deal in the first place and insisted that we ship my laptop a third time after losing it for over three weeks. Suffice it to say, my father didn't like that ...

After a two-hour fight, my dad finally managed to talk to a woman who worked in the "executive escalation" department; My current theory is that this is where "difficult" customers are targeted to be bluntly told no and handled, or to buy their warranties. Fortunately for me, my dad managed to secure a purchase so that I could afford to buy a new laptop, and he received an email confirming that they would refund the price of the laptop and the warranty; the email also indicated that the box to be returned would be arriving shortly.

If you are thinking that the nightmare is over, as we did, then you would be wrong, as are we, because the box never showed up, and when my dad went to get the email we received, then he sent an email to our claims representative, had suddenly disappeared; We later learned from our email provider that SquareTrade had bypassed their firewall just to remember that email.

At this point, I thought my father was going to sue the company for fraud outright because he was angry, and I mean really angry. But no, somehow she found him getting back on the phone and repeating the same two-hour process that he went through once before. It is worth nothing here that at no time has any SquareTrade employee denied that the email was sent, or even claimed that it was a technical error; They all insisted that the company had no record of that email being sent, and that tells you something about the company because you don't handle a customer that way unless you've been told from above to do so specifically. Even once you managed to speak to someone in the executive escalation department, no one would admit that:

  1. Any email was sent.
  2. That they ever agreed to buy our policy.
  3. That he had ever spoken to someone in the executive escalation department.

In the end, we finally managed to secure a purchase, but for anyone reading this and considering buying a SquareTrade policy: no, just run; my father, who has been around for over fifty years and practiced law for over thirty, said he had never seen anything comparable in terms of the size and sophistication of the massive scam that is SquareTrade. If that doesn't deter you, at least you've been warned ...

Predatory trailer. While this may not be the most life-ruining experience, it certainly makes you fantasize about using baseball bats in ways you never imagined after being the victim of such atrocity. My blood still boils thinking about it. Let me explain: I live in a fairly affluent and liberal area, Montgomery County, MD, to be exact. Montgomery County borders directly on Washington DC, so the government basically drives the entire economy and gets people to flock to the area ...

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Responding anonymously because who the hell knows who will read this.

I used to work for a small telemarketing company. We were hired by small companies to promote their entire range of products / services, or by surprisingly large companies (like GE. I was proud to have incorporated it) to promote specific products or specific new things.

When I say small, I mean small. During the whole time I was there, the whole company was never more than 10 people. That is the business owner, office manager, receptionist, and the actual marketing / sales team. And most of the time it was done

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Responding anonymously because who the hell knows who will read this.

I used to work for a small telemarketing company. We were hired by small companies to promote their entire range of products / services, or by surprisingly large companies (like GE. I was proud to have incorporated it) to promote specific products or specific new things.

When I say small, I mean small. During the whole time I was there, the whole company was never more than 10 people. That is the business owner, office manager, receptionist, and the actual marketing / sales team. And most of the time it was reduced to 6-7 people. This was generally not a problem, because we were good at what we did, but our owner was incredibly aware of what it looked like and was completely obsessed with the image. I would go out to give a sales pitch to a company, and sometimes the number of people in the client's boardroom was twice the number of our entire company.

We always had extra space in the office, including extra phones and computers (fully functional and networked, etc.). So we could support 15-20 workers in that office.

So the bad part comes here: When we had a particularly smart client who would come into the office to go over details or whatever, our owner would get a lot of "interviewees" on and after a short interview (literally 5 minutes ) with him in the office, they would put them on a 1-2 hour "trial of work" where they would receive a short briefing (usually by me) on what to do and then they would be left loose on the computers for a couple of hours . JUST to make the office look busier when the customer walks in. Actually, there was never a vacant position, never. He even called them "counting interviews." Then,

We all feel bad about it. This was a few years ago, when it was even harder to get a job than now (I'm in the UK), and when I was doing these 'staff interviews', I was promoting it as an entry-level job with a decent salary (around £ 16-17,000). So all these bright and enthusiastic young people will arrive grateful to have landed an interview at such a time. They'd be asking all the right questions and trying all those interview tricks they teach you to make a good impression and we'd just be sitting there like: | Because we knew it was all in vain Nobody wanted to bother him internally because, like I said, the bad time to be looking for a job and "being too disagreeing with the boss" was an easy way to get fired, as had happened a couple of times. The owner had us in a keg and he knew it.

However, some karma did come in. Finally, he decided to try to grow the business and get a more stable number of employees. The problem is, by then the recruitment agencies I was using seemed to have figured out what I was doing, and since they were being paid per nominee sent rather than candidate hired, they were simply sending the worst of the worst. I remember trying to train someone (who was there for a GENUINE job test / interview for a real position) who didn't know what "right click" meant when using a computer, someone who didn't know what "Mail electronic "were people who could barely spell, etc., etc., so he never managed to grow.

And then once the job market eased a bit, we all jumped ship because none of us could handle the environment anymore and finally there was a safe way out. Once the team leader quit / got fired (he basically blew up with the owner for all the horrible and dirty things that had been going on and left, and then got another much better job a week later, ironically in recruiting), everyone those who worked there prevailed. the receptionist (who was a childhood friend of the owner) had been gone in about 10 months, and now has 3 full time employees. The original team that left even has a WhatsApp group where we jokingly (but seriously) refer to ourselves as survivors of the company. Three of us are in therapy due to the depression we developed working there for years. All this time and I still hate the place.

Actually, that's an important lesson about dishonest business practices. Decent people don't like to do it any more than victims like to suffer it. In my experience, they tend to be driven by unscrupulous people at the top of the chain. The problem is, if you do it too long, all the decent people will leave. And then all you're left with are terrible people who can't get a job anywhere else, or people who are talented but equally unscrupulous and who will happily work against you for their own benefit. It never seems like a good idea to me.

We bought a timeshare in a really nice location. We enjoyed it immensely and it was our place to spend special family moments. We had one of over 15,000 units in the entire complex and for many years it was great

The timeshare company in the early 2000s became optimistic and started an investment group to buy other timeshares. Then in 2008 the market crashed and the business went under, but they didn't tell any of the timeshare owners and they were still selling other timeshares and programs.

It was "bought" by another company with "coincidentally" almost exactly the same management team. A network of companies

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We bought a timeshare in a really nice location. We enjoyed it immensely and it was our place to spend special family moments. We had one of over 15,000 units in the entire complex and for many years it was great

The timeshare company in the early 2000s became optimistic and started an investment group to buy other timeshares. Then in 2008 the market crashed and the business went under, but they didn't tell any of the timeshare owners and they were still selling other timeshares and programs.

It was "bought" by another company with "coincidentally" almost exactly the same management team. A network of companies including a Barbados offshore account was created and assets were transferred.

His goal at the time was simply to get the money back for investors. So they had a plan to kick out the timeshare owners and sell the complex to make money. In fact, they had a secondary presentation that they showed in which their plan said that this was similar to a business model of cell phone cancellation. All based on the fact that timeshare contracts had no cancellation clause, they forced people to pay to lose their timeshares or pay to stay for the required “renewals”.

Thousands of people fought in court. It went on for several years and was lost. They were able to manipulate the system so that what they did was not illegal, at least in the eyes of the courts.

While the court case was all involved they were prevented from using the complex and added 26% interest per year and soaring maintenance fees even though the complex was almost completely empty.

Many people wrote to different people / positions in the local and federal government, who simply pointed the finger somewhere else saying it was not their problem for one reason or another.

Some people ended up paying the company nearly $ 100,000 to LOSE their timeshares and just get out of this. I had to pay almost $ 25k. And that was so I could lose my initial timeshare investment of roughly $ 40k, which at the time I went into debt to buy. They then began to downsize the complex and sell it. There are already ads to buy at the "new" resort.

Some seniors had to sell their retirement home to pay a $ 70,000 bill. One mother said she had to sell her house because she had to pay for her daughter's cancer treatment and could only afford one and keep her house. Many were driven into bankruptcy. One man had been assigned the timeshare and had never stayed there and then received a bill for $ 50,000. It was a complete nightmare for many who could not pay these crazy bills to cancel their contracts.

From what I understand investors only got about 1/3 of their money back. Simple math calculates that there was at least $ 50 million on top of that, maybe more. Where all the money went is something I will probably never know, but I would speculate that the offshore account may have come into play.

What they did was incredibly smart and by far the dirtiest business tactic I have ever seen ... but apparently all legal at least in Canada. The architect of this plan was a certified public accountant who became CEO and really knew how to play with the system.

I don't think there was anyone involved who didn't lose complete faith in the system. The lesson I learned for me is don't trust timeshare companies, know how a contract can be canceled, and be careful when standing up for what you think is right. He already had little faith in our political and justice systems.

Take a legal document intended to protect all parties and use it as a game of hide and seek to generate profit. Today there are many companies that use the contract in this way. People will say that it is the responsibility of consumers to read and understand what they are signing, and I would agree 100%.

But let's see the contract. Who does it? The business. Who completes the contract? The business. What information do consumers have about the format of the contracts? Zero. So who do you think is protected? The business.

I live in Utah and have been working for the past 5 years.

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Take a legal document intended to protect all parties and use it as a game of hide and seek to generate profit. Today there are many companies that use the contract in this way. People will say that it is the responsibility of consumers to read and understand what they are signing, and I would agree 100%.

But let's see the contract. Who does it? The business. Who completes the contract? The business. What information do consumers have about the format of the contracts? Zero. So who do you think is protected? The business.

I live in Utah and have worked for the past 5 years trying to make the auto sales contract more consumer friendly and easier to read and follow. I currently have a bill that will be presented in the 2020 session, in January, that will do just that.

It wouldn't change the dealer so much that it would change the car sales contract.
In fact, I am currently very close to doing this here in Utah, and then I'm going to work to do it nationally.
The dealerships have taken a legal document that is intended to protect "all" parties and turned it into a way to make a profit by playing hide and seek with charges. And lying to consumers about what is required and what is optional. So I have created a page that I call "Contract Summary" that takes all the charges in the original contract and puts them in a format that is easy to follow and tells what each item costs and which items are optional and not. will require as a stipulation of the purchase of the car. And it requires consumers to sign or initial each charge so they know exactly what they are being charged. It doesn't tell distributors what they can or can't "offer" to consumers, so it doesn't tell them how to do business.

To be fair, car dealers are not the only company using for-profit contracts and taking advantage of consumers. Businesses know that hardly anyone will read the entire contract and they use it against consumers to generate profit. Is it legal Yes Is it partly the fault of the consumers? Yes. Is it "disgusting", unethical and amoral? Oh yeah!!

Manipulation of the bidding process. It happens all too often in both small and large jobs, but it is perfectly legal.

When we work for an engineering firm, we accept offers from contractors on behalf of cities or the state. Contractors would submit bids, listing the cost of each item. For example, 100 cubic feet of asphalt, 1.2 acres cleared (small trees and shrubs removed), 5 collection basins, 2 12 ″ diameter trees removed, etc.

Individual prices and quantities were tallied and the lowest bidder would get the job. But when contractors were paid, they were paid for the actual work done. So if the

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Manipulation of the bidding process. It happens all too often in both small and large jobs, but it is perfectly legal.

When we work for an engineering firm, we accept offers from contractors on behalf of cities or the state. Contractors would submit bids, listing the cost of each item. For example, 100 cubic feet of asphalt, 1.2 acres cleared (small trees and shrubs removed), 5 collection basins, 2 12 ″ diameter trees removed, etc.

Individual prices and quantities were tallied and the lowest bidder would get the job. But when contractors were paid, they were paid for the actual work done. So if they needed less asphalt, they were paid only for what was used, if they ended up needing more, they were paid for it. It sounds reasonable and fair, but some contractors would take advantage of the system by overselling items they thought they would need in greater quantity and offering fewer items that they thought they might not need.

For example, we had a road project that was designed, but not tendered for several years because the money was not available at the time. Of course, the terrain survey was probably done even a year earlier. This delay allowed a less scrupulous contractor to take advantage of the situation.

The plans called for something like 2.5 acres of cleanup and grubbing (removal of small trees, brush, and top soil), and a fairly small number of 10 ″ and 12 ″ trees removed. Contractor A bid 50k for the 2.5 acres and $ 500 for each of the 6 trees to be removed. Contractor B bid 10k for the 2.5 acres but 5k per tree. So 53k vs 40k. Contractor B won the bid.

But Contractor B knew that the plans were now out of date and the trees are growing. So many smaller trees that were just part of the felling, were now separate items that they would be paid for. So 40 additional trees had to be removed at 5k each. 200k extra!

Over the years I got to know the contractors well, with some always offering the work fairly and automatically including everything they knew needed to be done (even if it wasn't explicitly stated in the plans), while others always succeeded. receive an additional payment. for it. Private developers who weren't required to pick the highest bidder and who knew that contractors would often pick the best contractor, the one they knew would not be overcharged for extras.

I have seen the same with residential contractors. Good contractors who may not be the cheapest, but have already included in the offer what they know needs to be done, and the others who only bid were asked to know that they can get a lot more when the job is done.

The practice of the game with people and life insurance policy. Wal-Mart and many other major corporations practice this policy. They have a whole department of people to calculate the risk of the employees living. and take out life insurance without them knowing it. And if they get a policy to pay, they don't give the family anything. I'm not mad at Wal-Mart, I'm really disappointed in humanity. If you just open your eyes and admit that we as a society have become ungodly and have turned away from Christ. I'm not saying that everyone believes the way I do. But this is my point. Us first

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The practice of the game with people and life insurance policy. Wal-Mart and many other major corporations practice this policy. They have a whole department of people to calculate the risk of the employees living. and take out life insurance without them knowing it. And if they get a policy to pay, they don't give the family anything. I'm not mad at Wal-Mart, I'm really disappointed in humanity. If you just open your eyes and admit that we as a society have become ungodly and have turned away from Christ. I'm not saying that everyone believes the way I do. But this is my point. First we have to own our deficiencies and fix the things we have control over and give the rest to God. We learned the behavior that we have had and I thought that I have accepted the fact that I had bad teachers. I am not at my full potential. So I'll take care of this and correct what needs to be corrected. Most people are not going to admit their faults and correct them, it is very difficult and very uncomfortable. But if you are unhappy and can't admit it to yourself, how can you expect to have a happy life? Hell, I don't know where all that comes from. But I have to say that I have realized that I need a new education and I learn better from good teachers. And if the rest of us continue to follow bad behavior and stop hiding it under the rug, we, as a society, will destroy ourselves. That easy. Be open to learning what should have been thought to start with. Educate, not incarcarate. Let God be God and the rest of us should try to be the best for us. It's too hard and too uncomfortable. But if you are unhappy and can't admit it to yourself, how can you expect to have a happy life? Hell, I don't know where all that comes from. But I have to say that I have realized that I need a new education and I learn better from good teachers. And if the rest of us continue to follow bad behavior and stop hiding it under the rug, we, as a society, will destroy ourselves. That easy. Be open to learning what should have been thought to start with. Educate, not incarcarate. Let God be God and the rest of us should try to be the best for us. It's too hard and too uncomfortable. But if you are unhappy and can't admit it to yourself, how can you expect to have a happy life? Hell, I don't know where all that comes from. But I have to say that I have realized that I need a new education and I learn better from good teachers. And if the rest of us continue to follow bad behavior and stop hiding it under the rug, we, as a society, will destroy ourselves. That easy. Be open to learning what should have been thought to start with. Educate, not incarcarate. Let God be God and the rest of us should try to be the best for us. But I have to say that I have realized that I need a new education and I learn better from good teachers. And if the rest of us continue to follow bad behavior and stop hiding it under the rug, we, as a society, will destroy ourselves. That easy. Be open to learning what should have been thought to start with. Educate, not incarcaratre. Let God be God and the rest of us should try to be the best for us. But I have to say that I have realized that I need a new education and I learn better from good teachers. And if the rest of us continue to follow bad behavior and stop hiding it under the rug, we, as a society, will destroy ourselves. That easy. Be open to learning what should have been thought to start with. Educate, not incarcarate. Let God be God and the rest of us should try to be the best for us. And if the rest of us continue to follow bad behavior and stop hiding it under the rug, we, as a society, will destroy ourselves. That easy. Be open to learning what should have been thought to start with. Educate, not incarcarate. Let God be God and the rest of us should try to be the best for us. And if the rest of us continue to follow bad behavior and stop hiding it under the rug, we, as a society, will destroy ourselves. That easy. Be open to learning what should have been thought to start with. Educate, not incarcarate. Let God be God and the rest of us should try to be the best for us.

Using a toilet!

It was my first trip to Europe. And I traveled with my family to 5 countries.

Now, I have little experience in "travel abroad". And I have traveled to the United Arab Emirates and few Asian countries. But the trip to Europe was different.

We had to pay a lot to use the bathroom.

I mean, why?

In European countries there is no shortage of 'free public toilets' like India. (Which I have witnessed increasingly cut back with free / affordable and automated toilets across my country.) But by the way, 'Toilets' have become more expensive even in terms of European standards. And the greatest hypocrisy is even many

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Using a toilet!

It was my first trip to Europe. And I traveled with my family to 5 countries.

Now, I have little experience in "travel abroad". And I have traveled to the United Arab Emirates and few Asian countries. But the trip to Europe was different.

We had to pay a lot to use the bathroom.

I mean, why?

In European countries there is no shortage of 'free public toilets' like India. (Which I have witnessed increasingly cut back with free / affordable and automated toilets across my country.) But by the way, 'Toilets' have become more expensive even in terms of European standards. And the biggest hypocrisy is that even many restaurants are charging 'Toilet Fee', which ideally should be a free basic necessity and convenience for your customer.

Below is a photo I took at Burger King in Vienna. (We have to pay € 0.50 to use the bathroom)

Many tourist attractions charge from € 1 to € 2! And most charge something.

The rare free public toilets have long lines of tourists and locals, for obvious reasons.

I wondered the pride of beauty and cleanliness, the happiness of being a developed country is something diabolical, when the basic needs of humans cannot be met.

PS: I know that toilets in India charge between INR 2 and INR 5. And it's often not very clean, but it's okay if you understand the urge to use the bathroom sometimes. And comparing salaries and income, using the toilets in European countries is very expensive even for locals (I commented on it with humor with some locals).

I think they also need their own version of 'Toilet - Ek Prem Katha'. ;) :P

Edit: I don't intend to start any arguments about cleanliness, standards, and affordability. Nor about which country is better. It is a simple need of the human being.

We are the most intelligent beings on this planet. Yet we are still the beihns of this planet. All living beings carry out respiration, food, life, shelter and, of course, the basic cycle of daily life.

All I wanted to point out was that we shouldn't try to profit from everything. Please don't be so insensitive. Don't be so selfish. We are all human beings.

Also according to business logic, having "free toilets" or at least "affordable toilets" may be more useful for all the beautiful cafes, chocolate shops and restaurants across Europe, if you get it.

Something from Sweden here.

The housing situation is a mess here, so often tenants have to opt for apartments that are sublet by housing boards.

Now when you do that, there is very little regulation to worry about, so you can practically charge nasty rent and get away with it.

So, let's say a first-hand contract, that is, a contract between the tenant and the housing council costs 100. This tenant, then goes up, leaves it to another tenant, which is known as a second-hand / andra hand contract For example, 130.

This 30 is divided between the housing council and the tenant and this income is taxed

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Something from Sweden here.

The housing situation is a mess here, so often tenants have to opt for apartments that are sublet by housing boards.

Now when you do that, there is very little regulation to worry about, so you can practically charge nasty rent and get away with it.

So, let's say a first-hand contract, that is, a contract between the tenant and the housing council costs 100. This tenant, then goes up, leaves it to another tenant, which is known as a second-hand / andra hand contract For example, 130.

These 30 are divided between the housing council and the tenant and this income is taxed, so basically the government is also left with a cut (indirectly).

In cities where the real estate crisis is really bad, Stockholm and Gothenburg, for example, this second-hand contract is sublet to another for 150.

Add to this the deposit that you invariably get only 70-80% if the owner is unscrupulous, and you have the housing market in Sweden.

How can you screw the tenants a little more? Just say you want to sign a 6-month contract and then we'll see how long we can extend it. Done, 6 months later, rent increases by 30% and tenants are helpless as a month or two may not be enough to find a replacement.

Avoid such contracts at all costs. And if you do, make sure you have some leverage left. Your best bet is a first-hand contract, which is almost impossible in a big city and your odds are even worse if you are not Swedish. Buying an apartment is close, but you choose this option only if you plan to stay here for a long time.

Sorry to burst the bubble, but we have this form of corruption in utopia called Sweden.

I guess this can be described as a business tactic. I was looking for a new position, if I remember correctly, it was around the year 2000. The company advertised software people with experience in image and pattern recognition. I have two master's degrees that involve these technologies applied to satellite images. I sent them a copy of my resume, explained my background, and they asked me to come in for an interview. As I recall, getting to your company was an adventure. But once there, little warning flags started popping up. His work was in recognition of the printing press and cheesy

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I guess this can be described as a business tactic. I was looking for a new position, if I remember correctly, it was around the year 2000. The company advertised software people with experience in image and pattern recognition. I have two master's degrees that involve these technologies applied to satellite images. I sent them a copy of my resume, explained my background, and they asked me to come in for an interview. As I recall, getting to your company was an adventure. But once there, little warning flags started popping up. His work was in recognition of printing and cursive writing. But they wanted as much detail as possible of the various approaches that I / we had taken at the University. It wasn't until the end of a rather grueling 2 hour interview with his chief technology officer that I began to realize his intention. This was a new area for them and they were receiving job interviewers and educating them in the field. They had little or no intention of hiring anyone at the time. Well, I shouldn't say that with absolute certainty. But talking to one of his other guys after the interview that's what came out. Hiring one person was secondary and they were hiring several people. Mainly, they just wanted a free education. Total waste of my time, probably more than 4 hours. I understand that it is a two-way street educating both sides, but in this case it felt really one-sided. But talking to one of his other guys after the interview that's what came out. Hiring one person was secondary and they were hiring several people. Mainly, they just wanted a free education. Total waste of my time, probably more than 4 hours. I understand that it is a two-way street educating both sides, but in this case it felt really one-sided. But talking to one of his other guys after the interview that's what came out. Hiring one person was secondary and they were hiring several people. Mainly, they just wanted a free education. Total waste of my time, probably more than 4 hours. I understand that it is a two-way street educating both sides, but in this case it felt really one-sided. probably more than 4 hours. I understand that it is a two-way street educating both sides, but in this case it felt really one-sided. But talking to one of his other guys after the interview that's what came out. Hiring one person was secondary and they were hiring several people. Mainly, they just wanted a free education. Total waste of my time, probably more than 4 hours. I understand that it is a two-way street educating both sides, but in this case it felt really one-sided. probably more than 4 hours. I understand that it is a two-way street educating both sides, but in this case it felt really one-sided. But talking to one of his other guys after the interview that's what came out. Hiring one person was secondary and they were hiring several people. Mainly, they just wanted a free education. Total waste of my time, probably more than 4 hours. I understand that it is a two-way street educating both sides, but in this case it felt really one-sided. they just wanted a free education. Total waste of my time, probably more than 4 hours. I understand that it is a two-way street educating both sides, but in this case it felt really one-sided. they just wanted a free education. Total waste of my time, probably more than 4 hours. I understand that it is a two-way street educating both sides, but in this case it felt really one-sided.

I heard this story and I am not sure if it is true.

There was a guy who wanted to buy counterfeit currency from a merchant. Let's call him Mr. Poppycock.

Poppycock was new to fakes and wanted to test if things would work out. So, he went to a dealer (let's call him Mr. One Eye) in a place far away from his hometown and bought counterfeit 200K for 75K.

Poppycock started testing the fake coins she bought and soon realized they were perfect. Nobody complained about the currency and even people who handled a lot of cash did not doubt it. Everything went exactly as planned.

This did

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I heard this story and I am not sure if it is true.

There was a guy who wanted to buy counterfeit currency from a merchant. Let's call him Mr. Poppycock.

Poppycock was new to fakes and wanted to test if things would work out. So, he went to a dealer (let's call him Mr. One Eye) in a place far away from his hometown and bought counterfeit 200K for 75K.

Poppycock started testing the fake coins she bought and soon realized they were perfect. Nobody complained about the currency and even people who handled a lot of cash did not doubt it. Everything went exactly as planned.

This made him realize the opportunity he had at hand and therefore he went to the dealer with a HUGE amount of money to obtain a VERY HUGE amount of counterfeit coins. However, this time he got caught in a jiffy and ended up bankrupt and behind bars.

What really happened: Mr. One Eye gave Mr. Poppycock 200,000 real coins the first time he approached him believing that he would come back for more if the initial deal goes well! A perfect example of calculated risk considering that Mr. One Eye and Mr. Poppycock did not know each other.

I'm not sure if this qualifies as a business. However, the way the money was made is nothing short of nonsense.

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