What's the easiest highest paying title in the US?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Nicholas Porter



What's the easiest highest paying title in the US?

Most of the highest paying jobs with just a bachelor's degree are related to engineering, which is among the most difficult degrees to obtain. The level of math required and the ability to apply it is beyond most people due to the ability and / or effort required. Which is about the only reason these titles have such high salaries. Nothing easy pays well.

But there are many jobs that require considerable effort but not rigorous education. In this case, you trade the effort in school with the effort that is exhausted in the early years of your career. Sales jobs come to mind. Requires

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Most of the highest paying jobs with just a bachelor's degree are related to engineering, which is among the most difficult degrees to obtain. The level of math required and the ability to apply it is beyond most people due to the ability and / or effort required. Which is about the only reason these titles have such high salaries. Nothing easy pays well.

But there are many jobs that require considerable effort but not rigorous education. In this case, you trade the effort in school with the effort that is exhausted in the early years of your career. Sales jobs come to mind. It takes a bit more luck to be well paid in these careers (compared to engineering), but the salary ceiling is usually higher than in engineering-based careers.

For these jobs, you would simply go with a degree in business administration. Economy if you want something a little more difficult that will give you more skills. I taught many people in Business Calculus and it is watered down enough that anyone can pass it with minimal effort (and maybe an engineering student as a tutor).

Ok, I hear this question about value and worth all the time.

Let me give you some advice that I learned when I was very young, value is earned because it is difficult and / or rare, if it was easy everyone would have it, therefore it would be common, then its value would be 0. This is economics 101.

Anything worthwhile in this world is difficult and rare, get used to that idea, it will save you a lot of frustration in life.

So you want to make a lot of money with a degree? Enter the most difficult and demanding program that accepts the fewest number of people.

What a strange question. High-paying jobs require a lot of work and a good education. If you are looking for an easy job, I'm not sure where to find it, but you may not need a college degree. I think you should probably focus on getting married well, maybe you can get a hardworking spouse who makes a lot of money. Does that work for you?

It depends on where your talent is. Are you an expert in writing or math?

If you are a writer, you want a social science. If you're good at math, you want a penny

science, physics, biology, geology, etc. If none, you want a professional degree, such as a nurse, business administration, etc.

Perhaps the question should be: "What talents and interests do I have that I can develop through formal or informal studies that are likely to be highly marketable?"

Here are some facts: The highest paying majors with a bachelor's degree for 2018 | Pay scale. Most of the highest paying starting positions are the ones you would expect, engineering and computer science. I was too lazy for those (and probably too stupid), so I studied economics.

Parents, and later their children, have been brainwashed that college is the only answer to financial prosperity; after all, it worked for generations. Today, more than 40 percent of high school graduates are enrolling in college. Only one in four graduates and gets a good job: Department of Labor. There is a supply versus demand problem and a mismatch between acquired skills and demanded skills.

At the same time, community colleges and trades are stigmatized in many ways, both overtly and covertly. Secondary schools have destroyed their professional training.

A selective, multi-level post-se

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Parents, and later their children, have been brainwashed that college is the only answer to financial prosperity; after all, it worked for generations. Today, more than 40 percent of high school graduates are enrolling in college. Only one in four graduates and gets a good job: Department of Labor. There is a supply versus demand problem and a mismatch between acquired skills and demanded skills.

At the same time, community colleges and trades are stigmatized in many ways, both overtly and covertly. Secondary schools have destroyed their professional training.

A selective, multi-tiered postsecondary education system like Germany's would never be accepted in the US One of the basic tenets of our society is egalitarianism. Remember Alexis de Tocqueville said, "Americans are so in love with equality that they would rather be equal in slavery than unequal in freedom."

In the US, parents and students must make better decisions about postsecondary education in the face of the constant "college for all" pace from educators, counselors, politicians, pop culture, special interest groups and , in particular, university administrators. .

There are many good jobs. They are simply not where people look.

I interviewed a woman last month on the subject of on-the-job training. If you complete your training, take all the tests, and earn your certifications, you can become an Ophthalmic Medical Technologist - $ 70K. He has no college debt and is paid to learn.

In my opinion, half of the young people who go to college should go to community college. One of my favorite programs is robotics technician, I find it funny. Invest $ 10K and qualify for a full-time job with benefits of $ 50K. The classes are almost empty. Some of the classes are free government grants.

My local community college has discontinued your plumbing certification, with no interest. My plumber makes $ 100,000.

How about an apprenticeship? Learn to repair elevators and earn $ 78K. There is a cohort of blue-collar Baby Boomers on the brink of retirement.

But instead of acquiring the skills to qualify for a job as a breadwinner, young people are compelled and determined to go to a four-year college. Nobody explains the risks to them.

I could write a book with my collected anecdotes about young people who made a serious mistake while going to college. Here is an example:

The biggest debt burden

Charlie was a good student in a prosperous, suburban high school that sends 65% of its students to college. (At graduation, college goers wear their college hoodies to the stage to earn their diplomas.) Naturally, since his friends were going to college, Charlie wanted to go. He chose the most expensive public school about thirty miles from home. Like most students, it took him five years to get his sheepskin. His major was in English and he was unable to get a suitable job. He decided to go back to school to get another degree in creative writing. He chose an expensive private school ten miles from his home and lived on campus. He obtained a second degree. He currently lives at home. He has two part-time jobs and $ 88K in student loans.

By coincidence, I was doing volunteer work at Charlie's old high school. I shared the data of daunting jobs with the director. His response was, "We certainly don't want students to hear that."

When I talk to these young people, it usually starts out the same way. "I did everything right. I did what I was supposed to do." Some of them "bite the bullet" and go back to school to get an MBA, the new bachelor's degree. But many seem frozen in place. They are distraught and discouraged. The main variable in the conversation is the amount of student loan debt.

Sometimes I like to go through multiple answers to similar questions (considering merging them) and see if the essence of the question has been answered, and then see if I can add anything. This, I can.

This is a question that I have been asked many times when doing career assessment and assessment. Especially for adults, people want to know which are the shortest degree programs (usually an AAS) that will pay them back the most money. My first answers are always the same, generally nursing, technology and law. But there are others. To really help people who are considering going back.

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Sometimes I like to go through multiple answers to similar questions (considering merging them) and see if the essence of the question has been answered, and then see if I can add anything. This, I can.

This is a question that I have been asked many times when doing career assessment and assessment. Especially for adults, people want to know which are the shortest degree programs (usually an AAS) that will pay them back the most money. My first answers are always the same, generally nursing, technology and law. But there are others. To really help people who are considering going back to school for a career change, I'd like to provide a more detailed answer. Keep in mind that my advice would likely change substantially by knowing job history, experience, personality, IQ level, etc. one's. Therefore, this is general and is not intended to be specific professional or psychological advice in any way.


ASSOCIATED DEGREES IN THE MEDICAL FIELD

The first reason my initial line of advice is medical is simply because it is an incredibly stable industry. It will almost always be in demand, with a few (but few) exceptions. The second reason is that it starts with good pay, rather than requiring too many years of upward work. My third reason is because it often arouses a (psychological) desire for people to go further. I know people who were vet techs who become DVMs. I have seen at least one pharmacy technician who is now on Pharm.D. school. Registered nurses often end up reverting to APRNs. It's such a catalytic field, who knows, it might end up in Medical School one day.

The average for a registered nurse is around 60k. I can tell you anecdotally, I have met people with LVN / LPN degrees (only one year of education) who earned over 70k after taxes in their first year. I helped them with their taxes. They worked long hours both in home health and in the hospital. Whether you do LVN or RN, you can rack up a lot of money quickly. Warning, some states may require a BSN, but very few do. All states require that you pass the NCLEX if we are talking about RN. Also, I think the nursing field has the most potential. Mr. Nursing Practicing Psychiatrist (with only 2 years of postgraduate education) could earn more in one year than I, as Dr. Psychologist (with 5 to 7 years of postgraduate education). It is a very good return on investment. Anesthesiology nurses pay a lot of money ... where did they all start? With an associate degree in nursing (ADN) or something similar leading to an RN.

The following medical associate degrees result in approximately $ 40,000 - $ 70,000 annual salaries, depending on location: Registered Nurse, Physical Therapy Assistant, Veterinary Technology, Radiation Technology, Dental Hygienist, Occupational Therapy Assistant, Respiratory Therapy, Funeral Directors ( some states require a bachelor's degree), Cardiovascular Technologist. Another option, rarely mentioned in online surveys because it is rare, is the psychometrist. Honestly, I STILL have to find some associate degree program that trains this role, essentially a technician to a psychologist. I myself have considered developing an online certification program to train psychometrists. If you work full time and are very knowledgeable about psychological testing and report writing,

At the low end, you'll have other associate degrees that pay between $ 30,000 and $ 50,000, but can bring in higher salaries with experience and education: Pharmacy Technician, Substance Abuse Counselor, Vocational Nurse, or Nursing Assistant. I have sometimes had clients who cared more about making a difference so these might be appropriate. For example, a recovering alcoholic might want to be a substance abuse counselor, who pays $ 30,000 to $ 40,000 if he manages to work with a private practice, but it could also be a catalyst for future education in social work or psychotherapy.

Note that not all of these (indeed many) do not require needles, blood, urine, etc. LOL. Some, like Substance Abuse and Funeral Direction, are more business casual wear, while others are uniform.


ASSOCIATED DEGREES IN LAW

While this should be the third, after technology, I love the law, so my personal preference elevates it. ;) This degree will rarely start at more than $ 50k, but it should start near there, depending on YOU. When I graduated from an ABA-accredited paralegal program, I had an impressive portfolio of memos, reports (some even appeals), original complaints, motions, the entire nine meters. If you have a natural talent for law, you will probably find a good comfortable position. Doing so can show how much they are worth and see very significant salary increases.

Case in point: I did a law internship at a very successful uptown Dallas law practice. I don't know how much the first-year associates made, but I do know that one drove a well-aged Nissan Pathfinder (I think 1995), another drove what appeared to be a 2001 Pontiac Sunfire or something lol. Our senior paralegal (everyone knew it sucked) had a really nice office overlooking downtown Dallas, drove a BMW 5 Series at just a couple of years old, and only worked with partners and senior partners. This woman did NOT have a title. He was probably in his forties or fifties. They told me I was earning more than six figures, but I don't know.

The above case is obviously an outlier, but nevertheless, it is VERY normal for a paralegal at a decent law firm to earn between $ 50,000 and $ 70,000 a year. I suspect that the above six-figure example is not common, but it is certainly not a limited or super rare situation.

My point here is that paralegals often know A LOT about the law, and their services (if they are talented) are INVALUABLE to attorneys. If you love the law and are detail-oriented, a good ABA-accredited paralegal degree will teach you the basics of the law in less than two years. Be good at what you do and you'll become a partner your attorneys couldn't dream of living without. A note on education: the ABA is reviewing and approving more paralegal programs than it used to do, but there are certainly good programs that are not ABA approved (I think they use the word approved, not accredited; but I can't recall for sure). The most important point is to make sure you find a program that uses experienced attorneys as its faculty.

As with my medical example, you may find that you love the law so much, that a JD is in your future. This was my case, and my familiarity with legal concepts, terminology, basic torts law, basic criminal law, etc., gave me a fair amount of legal knowledge, which made law school more of a family friend than an intimidating stranger.

One final note: some states DO allow paralegals to work in private practice. This can be done in two ways, but the laws surrounding it are very rigid. First's freelance paralegals can work on their own by marketing their services (from home or from their own office) to attorneys as needed. Many recent law school graduates who can't afford (or don't even need) a paralegal love this setup. Even large companies that sometimes need to hire an additional paralegal for a case use freelance paralegals. The other option, the freelance paralegal, works for himself directly with the public. They are not allowed to "practice law" in any state, but they are allowed to help with some paperwork if the client knows what they want to do and the paralegals act as facilitators, not interpreters or advisers. Again, both are a bit tricky.


ASSOCIATE DEGREES IN TECHNOLOGY

I have less to say here, as I am largely unfamiliar with these fields (even though my bachelor's degree is in business technology), as well as advising other people on them.

Technology is here to stay. If you can train in computer science, aviation technology, nuclear physics, web development, information security, programming, aerospace technology, network support, etc. then you will be in demand and you should have no problem earning more than 50k.

One caveat here. Some high school students have told me, "I love computers, so I'm going to do an AAS in Computer Science." Hm. It's okay. Just keep in mind that "computer science" can be a very broad field, and an associate's degree in too broad a field can be detrimental. For example, someone who knows "a little about computing in general", compared to someone who spent two years in support and network security, with some classes, in addition, in web design and social media marketing, is going to be a world. apart in terms of marketability. The former sounds good until you think about what it actually "knows." The latter clearly has a solid and SPECIFIC training. The same goes for aviation technology or aviation mechanics ... those people are SPECIFICALLY trained in the tech side of aviation or the mechanical side of aviation ... both very marketable, but both very different. Know what interests you.

Of course, that could be different if the student said "I want to do an AAS to really see what subfields are in Computer Science, then go on to a Bachelor's degree in the field that I enjoyed the most." That would have my blessing and it would also impress me.


ASSOCIATE DEGREES IN ENGINEERING

When I first went back to college, I was interested in exploring design and architecture. I loved. However, when the recession hit, I saw that architects and designers, en masse, were being laid off from companies or getting into savings if they were in private practice. But when the work is there, they get paid well. Architectural Drafting or Drafting Technician is just a two-year degree and can be rewarding if you love drafting. I love to draw, and I still have my drawing board in my studio ... but to do it DAILY, I would go crazy. Interior designers in some states can be licensed with just an associate's degree, and I've known designers who earn more than six figures, with just an associate's degree ... although that's rare. I think 50-60k is more likely for a designer. And I think the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) is pushing for all states to require a bachelor's degree. They were when I was in college. Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Aviation Mechanics are well-paying associate-level jobs. I think that while not technically an engineering degree, some other options might work in this category. For example, Land Surveying is generally just an associate's degree, with some years of experience in most states (however, having a bachelor's degree can decrease the experience required to get licensed). Similarly, residential inspectors or other types of inspectors can be paid very well. I once knew a preacher who was a kind of inspector who looked at pipes, or some particular accessory in pipes, for different factories. My dad was considering buying his business when he retired, which earned this preacher 70,000 a year, working just three days a week (the rest of the week he dedicated to his ministry and preaching). For that license, I only had a certificate, not even a degree.

While I don't know much about this field, if someone were an engineer, there are plenty of options here at the 2-year degree level. And, as with my other examples, it could lead one to higher education later on and eventually get closer to six figures.


FINAL WORD

I have not talked about business degrees (AAS in Business, Administration, Human Resources, etc.). I think the reason I don't mention them is because they don't really "need" a title. And ... I don't think those fields have an associated title that is terminal ... which means the title teaches you what you need to know. The degree for that, really and truly, is an MBA or a BBA in Accounting or HR or some other company-specific field. I also did not cover titles in construction, electrical, ACHV, plumbing, etc. I think these are good options, but without something else behind you (an entrepreneurial spirit, a trademark, etc.), you may not qualify. 50k threshold that inspired this answer). In fact, if you want to farm and be a real farmer, and you do it WELL ... You can earn more than six figures (I come from a family of farmers / ranchers). Most of the actual farmers in my community have very nice half-millimeter houses, inground pools, and F350s with thumbtacks lol. … Which in my areas is the red-collar equivalent of a Mercedes S-Class! (Just kidding.) There are many books on this topic ... check out Amazon's "You Can Farm" and "Better Farm Accounting" books. For the record, I see America slowly returning to its rural roots, and therefore I predict that agriculture, especially for young families, will become a lucrative market. (EDIT 6/26/20: I couldn't have predicted how successful the agriculture industry can be with an injection of social media and online blogs ... unbelievable!). I'm digressing ... and driving pimp F350s LOL. … Which in my areas is the red-collar equivalent of a Mercedes S-Class! (Just kidding.) There are many books on this topic ... check out Amazon's "You Can Farm" and "Better Farm Accounting" books. For the record, I see America slowly returning to its rural roots, and therefore I predict that agriculture, especially for young families, will become a lucrative market. (EDIT 6/26/20: I couldn't have predicted how successful the agriculture industry can be with an injection of social media and online blogs ... unbelievable!). I'm rambling ... and driving pimp F350s LOL. … Which in my areas is the red-collar equivalent of a Mercedes S-Class! (Just kidding.) There are a lot of books on this topic ... check out the books on Amazon " (EDIT 6/26/20: I couldn't have predicted how successful the agriculture industry can be with an injection of social media and online blogs ... unbelievable!). I'm digressing ...

In the examples of success I gave above that I know personally ... the vocational nurse who earned more than 70k in his first year ... the untitled paralegal who earned a degree close to or greater than 100k a year ... the interior designer with associate degree who made 100k a year ... the preacher who conducts inspections makes 70 thousand a year ... they all have one thing in common: there is a thread that ties their stories together:

Motivation.

These are all highly motivated people.

Before going back to college, I only had a GED. However, he worked for companies that managed and formed (huge) sales departments. And in almost every job I did around / over 50k (never mind the fact that I hated the field of sales lol). But for someone only 21, 22, 23 years old, making that kind of money in the early 2000s, sometimes more, flying to New York, Chicago, etc. to train people on how to sell ... it was amazing. What those jobs got me was that I was motivated, charming and catalyzing. You can find success (financially at least) in almost ANY field, if you are motivated and know how to get things done. But don't confuse the title with guaranteed results.

I've seen programs now, in universities, for entrepreneurship. I'm not sure how I feel about it, because entrepreneurship (to me) is more of an art than a science ... it's a feeling, a trend, an essence, a trait, a state of mind, maybe even! a bad habit!

All the titles I have discussed, at the very least, will probably earn someone a decent salary. But if you mix in some motivation and consider these programs more like an admission ticket to a program you are about to create, rather than the program itself, you will find greatness.

Hell, do you like to cut hair? Go get a damn cosmetology license and go to town. Make it happen. Do more than cut hair. Raise money for a cause in your classroom, market on Facebook, start a school system hygiene program, blog about your efforts, create a marketable “chain” for your programs ... you can take almost ANY career and turn it into something more. big. .. 50k is a pretty low goal and easy to hit. Start a landscaping business from scratch ... pun intended. ;)

Remind:

Grade = entrance to the show, not the show itself ...

Best of luck to all future title applicants,

- RC

I think he has been very misinformed, at least for people who live in the United States! For example, in West Michigan (where I live), the Monster.com job site reports that the average salary for an electrician working in Kalamazoo is $ 25.59 per hour (which equates to an annual salary of approximately $ 53,200), And electricians don't 'They don't need a college degree, although they generally must complete a paid apprenticeship (often through a union program) before being licensed. Plus, there are plenty of other high-paying jobs in the US that don't require college degrees: plumbers, HVAC technicians, auto repair.

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I think he has been very misinformed, at least for people who live in the United States! For example, in West Michigan (where I live), the Monster.com job site reports that the average salary for an electrician working in Kalamazoo is $ 25.59 per hour (which equates to an annual salary of approximately $ 53,200), And electricians don't need a college degree, although they generally must complete a paid apprenticeship (often through a union program) before being licensed. In addition, there are many other high paying jobs in the US that do not require college degrees: plumbers, HVAC technicians, auto repair specialists, carpenters, mechanics, machinists, commissioned professional salespeople, real estate agents, foodservice managers ,

And in terms of having "a good life," living and working in Kalamazoo (where the cost of living is more than 20% below the US national average) would allow for a fairly comfortable lifestyle with a annual income of $ 53,200!

Additionally, Kalamazoo is a medium-sized city with an estimated population of over 76,000 people, making it large enough to have a wide range of businesses, attractions, services, and educational opportunities for family members (including a good-sized public research university with NCAA Division I Sports plus a fairly large local community college) and an incredible array of year-round outdoor recreational activities including swimming, fishing, and boating in the Lake Michigan, which is reasonably close.

There are also a wealth of cultural opportunities available with a 72,000-square-foot art museum, a symphony orchestra, and three different annual music festivals. And Kalamazoo even has a semi-professional soccer team, a summer college baseball team, and a minor league hockey team (which is affiliated with the Vancouver Canucks).

But Kalamazoo isn't all that different from dozens of other affordable mid-size cities in the United States, which (during normal economic times, anyway) all have high-paying jobs available (many of which don't require college degrees)!

I think this is too broad a question to give answers in black and white. (Some questions are like this on this topic). Understandable, but difficult to answer. I mean, over time, even college degrees have gotten lower in ROI. They keep getting more expensive, without the guarantee of 40 to 25 years ago that you would end up in a high-paying job (in other words: a bigger investment with a less likely high return). Have they become useless because of that?

Having said that, Dennis Frailey pointed out precisely: It's also the way the title is used afterward. Some companies will be biased

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I think this is too broad a question to give answers in black and white. (Some questions are like this on this topic). Understandable, but difficult to answer. I mean, over time, even college degrees have gotten lower in ROI. They keep getting more expensive, without the guarantee of 40 to 25 years ago that you would end up in a high-paying job (in other words: a bigger investment with a less likely high return). Have they become useless because of that?

Having said that, Dennis Frailey pointed out precisely: it's also the way the title is used afterward. Some companies will have prejudices and / or bad experiences, and it is up to you to promote yourself with them and be aware of it. Meet nonacademic employers throughout your PhD. Talk to them at conferences (and listen! Hear what they are looking for and what their doubts may be to hire a PhD). See if you can get an internship (in the UK you should be able to get a few months PhD for that if you want).

Plus, get professional advice from dropouts on how they used their PhD. Don't just listen, but maybe alumni from your department. Your classmates and seniors who are still in college won't be able to tell you the things they know through experience.

As for an unfinished PhD (someone mentioned it here), yes it may seem like a waste of time to you, but for the person quitting, it may be better to have 'lost' two years than another year. It should not be a reason to stay in a PhD program if you are suffering. If you can explain your career change well in a job interview, it's not something to worry too much about.

Finally, there are places that do joint PhDs with industry (at least in the UK). Surely not for all topics. But they can be a great way to get to know the industry and connect with it, while pursuing a PhD.

In economics you rarely need math (apart from adding, subtracting, percents, etc. basic). There are some exceptions, but they are more or less related to attempts to forecast the future based on previously recorded key performance figures.

The problem with that is that you are trying to predict the future. Similarly, you could try to predict sports, there is no real difference. Obviously, it is impossible to predict randomness, 'black swan' events, also known as unforeseen things. The most you can look forward to is, in sporting terms, to see if someone can run fast and then you can assume that in the future that's

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In economics you rarely need math (apart from adding, subtracting, percents, etc. basic). There are some exceptions, but they are more or less related to attempts to forecast the future based on previously recorded key performance figures.

The problem with that is that you are trying to predict the future. Similarly, you could try to predict sports, there is no real difference. Obviously, it is impossible to predict randomness, 'black swan' events, also known as unforeseen things. What you can most expect is, in sporting terms, to see if someone can run fast and then you can assume that in the future that will run fast times the% difference in performance.

Economics is all about numbers and what those numbers represent and where they originate, how systems work. As Nidhi Aggarwal put it, the two have very little in common and practitioners of "serious" or "hard" science often scoff at economics.

IMHO, for things like running a business, the economy will help, but the math won't. In the case of the stock markets, hard work helps; maybe you better just try to catch all the news possible and understand the fields you are investing in. However, the complexity of your "crystal ball" will not make it accurate. if you could make it accurate enough, you would be able to make money, of course.

My advice would be that if you are going to study economics and mathematics, you may be interested in more theoretical simulations of economic systems or benefit from being able to run the business side of a business that deals with mathematics. For example, if you use higher math for science or programming and have a degree in economics, you are better suited for managerial positions because you understand both the business (money) aspect and the work your business or organization is doing.

And ... I wouldn't be under any illusions to be able to forecast the stock market. Instead of math you'd be better off with behavioral psychology (to understand how investors think and behave) and just understanding the fields and catching up on all the possible news about the different developments in order to anticipate trends.

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