What's the craziest thing you've done today?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Maisie Reid



What's the craziest thing you've done today?

I don't know if this qualifies for the craziest thing or not, but today, while waiting at the bus stop for about half an hour, I got really tired and suddenly I heard the beautiful voice of my friends and trust me, we can both talk to each other. U.S. for 1 hour without stopping.

So the moment I started talking to my friend in his own language, which I too can copy exactly like my friend, everyone around me started looking at me with shocked faces, but I kept talking to my friend.

Meet my friend "Koyal (the bird)".

Yes, I can imitate Koyal's exact voice and it's something really crazy that me and my friends love to see, especially during summers.

:-)

On July 2, 1982, a mysterious object was detected on radar over California. No one knew what the object was, as it was too small to be an airplane.

When those in authority approached, they realized that something was wrong.

There was a man tied to a lawn chair 16,000 feet in the air.

That man was Larry Walters, and he stopped at nothing until he could fly his Sears lawn chair toward the California skyline.

But Larry was freezing while being sunburned at the same time. He had a BB gun and a sandwich.

How did it get up there?


Larry Walters was a strange but interesting man, to say the least.

When i was a kid

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On July 2, 1982, a mysterious object was detected on radar over California. No one knew what the object was, as it was too small to be an airplane.

When those in authority approached, they realized that something was wrong.

There was a man tied to a lawn chair 16,000 feet in the air.

That man was Larry Walters, and he stopped at nothing until he could fly his Sears lawn chair toward the California skyline.

But Larry was freezing while being sunburned at the same time. He had a BB gun and a sandwich.

How did it get up there?


Larry Walters was a strange but interesting man, to say the least.

As a child, Larry walked into an Army-Navy Surplus store and was fascinated by the helium weather balloons that could be purchased there.

After seeing them for the first time, he knew what he wanted:

Larry wanted to fly.

For twenty years, Larry planned his operation.

As the years passed, there was no way he would let an opportunity like this slip away.

As with any operation, Larry needed a plan. This is what he came up with:


Launch location: your own backyard.

Larry's wife Carol financed this operation, albeit reluctantly, with a sum of $ 5,000.

Carol will also serve as ground control.

Target altitude: between 6,000 and 7,000 feet above sea level.

Destination destination: the Mojave Desert, which was more than 55 miles from his home.

Larry's Plane: Inspiration I, consisting of the following.

A: lawn chair

Larry called it "extremely comfortable," and reportedly bought the Sears lawn chair for $ 110.

B: 30 gallon jugs of spring water

These are important for balance as they will keep Larry from flying around.

These can also serve to slow down your descent by opening them when you get close to land.

C: 42 helium weather balloons

It is important to note that Larry has another braking system, which brings us to his inventory.

Larry's Inventory:

  • A: BB gun

When Larry wants to descend, he will shoot some of the balloons.

  • B: altimeter

This will be used to track your altitude.

  • C: two CB radios

These will be used so Larry can talk to his wife while going upstairs. The radios themselves have a maximum range of around two miles.

  • D: parachute

Pretty smart, if I say so myself.

  • E: life jacket

This tells us that you know this could go very wrong.

  • F: extra pair of glasses

You have really thought about this.

  • G: 35mm camera

Larry reported that these were expensive and very important.

  • H: 2 liter Coca-Cola bottle

No drugs, sadly just the drink. (Imagine listening to Pink Floyd high in the sky tasting acid.)

  • Me: sandwiches

It seems appropriate.


Release day

When the ground crew, which consisted of Carol and her friend Ron, broke the first rope, the second one snapped with it, and within seconds, Larry flew off.

To put it in perspective, how high Larry was off the ground, he was 15,500 feet in the air.

Another noteworthy aspect is that Larry planned to go no higher than 7,000 feet. He climbed twice as high and higher.

Speaking of the FAA, Larry didn't get permission to do this. He didn't actually tell anyone, which increased his wife's anxiety.

According to a man named Mark Barry, who has done extensive research on Larry Walters and his flight, this is what his flight path was like:

Note that Larry was targeting the Mojave Desert. It didn't come within 20 miles of that.

But thank goodness for Mark Barry, who discovered some of Larry's audio clips trying to explain himself.

You see, Larry had started firing some of the weather balloons as he was approaching 16,000 feet, but he couldn't fire any more because, well, he dropped his BB gun.

When he dropped the BB gun it came after losing his glasses, which fell off shortly after the strings snapped.

Fortunately for Larry, he had brought an extra pair.


To make this story even more meaningful, Larry had fired the exact number of weather balloons to ensure a safe landing.

At the end of it all, Larry slowly descended to the ground, where he remained virtually unharmed.

He was so impressed with what he saw that he forgot he had a camera. To be fair, I don't blame him.

But at the end of the day, Larry's impressive (but questionable) feat is still the only time anyone has survived something like this, and I think it will remain that way for a long time to come.

There is a video of the flight


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