What's the best way to verify genuine work on Upwork?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Finlay Griffiths



What's the best way to verify genuine work on Upwork?

Honestly, there is no genuine way to verify my experience. You are giving a leap of faith in the hope that when you do the work you will get paid. However, even if you get paid, they (the customer) can request a chargeback or reverse the transaction leaving you penniless. Upwork doesn't care if that happens and so does another platform.

Here are some tips for freelancing:

1. Use a contract on every project

If you're just starting to learn to freelance, let me help you avoid making one of the most common mistakes I see.

Use one contract for EVERY customer project.

But don't get bogged down in finding the perfect deal.

Starting with a template is fine, as long as you remember to keep making improvements along the way.

Too many freelancers get caught up in the details of contracts and ultimately it's a waste of time that should be spent making money.

All you need at the moment is a blanket agreement covering some

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Here are some tips for freelancing:

1. Use a contract on every project

If you're just starting to learn to freelance, let me help you avoid making one of the most common mistakes I see.

Use one contract for EVERY customer project.

But don't get bogged down in finding the perfect deal.

Starting with a template is fine, as long as you remember to keep making improvements along the way.

Too many freelancers get caught up in the details of contracts and ultimately it's a waste of time that should be spent making money.

All you need at the moment is a blanket agreement covering some basic but important terms that both you and the client need to agree on.

In its simplest form, the terms of your contract should cover:

• The work you produce is original and not plagiarized.

• Client proprietary information remains confidential.

• Your payment terms. (How much you will be paid and when during the process).

• That once the client accepts the finished work, they accept full responsibility for any additional processes in which the work is used (for example, printing, putting the logo into use, etc.)

• You and the client have the right to terminate the services and what that means for both of you.

Having some basic terms established for each project will help protect you, but more importantly, it will help inform the client of how you work.

I have prepared a general freelance contract for you to work. It is not intended to cover all types of situations, but it can help you get started.

See my freelance contract model »

Once you have your contract, your customer can physically print it, sign it, and return it or digitally sign it.

I am not a legal professional nor does the above example cover all situations.

If things are starting to take off and you are making big bucks from just one project:

Next, you may want to involve a legal professional in drawing up a specific contract for the job.

2. Always get a down payment

One of the biggest problems you hear about freelance work is that you don't get paid on time or that the client doesn't bother you.

Fortunately, I have never experienced this, but that is because I follow a simple process when starting a project.

To guarantee payment 100% of the time, you must request an initial payment.

For all projects I take on, I require 50% upfront before starting any official design work, and I make this clear to the client in our preliminary discussions and in my contracts.

If the customer has a problem with this, then that should raise a red flag.

There's a chance they've never hired freelance services before, but you should still raise your guard.

Explain that this arrangement is a protection for both parties and that the project cannot proceed without it.

If they refuse again:

Move on.

It's probably not someone I should be working with anyway.

Once I have received the signed contract and initial payment, I am ready to go to work.

Then before I turn over any viable files, I ask for the final 50% payment.

I do this so that the client does not take what I have created, cancel the project and run it.

Therefore, before you get paid in full, please do not submit any master files or designs in full resolution.

By putting these simple practices into your process, you can guarantee that you will never be scammed.

3. Don't be afraid to say "no"

Saying it's not difficult, especially if you're like me:

Generous and you want people to be happy working with you.

You don't want to disappoint anyone, so you offer to help in any way you can, without really considering the strenuous burden it will put on you.

No matter what you do, you will disappoint someone.

Whether it's the client because you can't get halfway through the project, your family because you work long hours, or yourself because you're overly stressed with the work you've chosen to do.

Therefore, you should feel comfortable turning down a job if it is ultimately not for you or your availability.

To help determine if you should take on a project, ask yourself these questions:

• Do I specialize in the work this client needs?

• Why am I taking on this project? Is it a commitment that I should make?

• Why am I adding that project to my plate?

The worst thing about assuming everything that comes your way is that your plate can end up full, but with all the wrong compromises.

You are stressed, anxious and the worst part:

Now you run out of space to take advantage of that golden opportunity.

You can't say yes to your ideal customer if you never say no to the wrong customers.

The next time you get a project, don't just answer yes:

Really consider the opportunity, ask yourself the questions above, and proceed with a conscious decision for your future and well-being.

4. Focus your autonomous business

If you've been following my writing for a while, you know that I share quite often on how to approach your freelance business and the importance of it.

I keep sharing this advice because I regularly get message after message from freelancers who seem to be stuck.

They can't find enough work and struggle to get their name out there.

By focusing on your brand identity and the type of projects you undertake, it will make everything much easier:

From marketing to charging higher fees to actual job delivery.

Choose one or two services to specialize and only accept jobs that fall into those categories. Then reject the rest.

Once you've decided on the services you specialize in now, be sure to translate that into your personal brand.

Reframe everything on your website for those keywords and phrases, show only that type of work in your freelance portfolio, and start producing content around those services to demonstrate your expertise.

This is all a by-product of marketing, which in turn will drive traffic and new freelance projects in its own way.

5. Show the work you want to do

This advice goes hand in hand with the previous advice to focus your autonomous business, but I think it is a topic worth delving into.

Many freelancers make the mistake of filling their portfolio with work just to show they have some kind of design skill.

But most of the time, work just pops up all over the place, and it will only do your portfolio a disservice.

There is a difference between a standalone business portfolio and a school portfolio:

Your freelance portfolio should only contain the job you specialize in and want to continue accepting through client work.

The work may consist of a previous client's work or even personal work.

Have you ever heard someone say, "Dress for the job you want, not the one you have"?

Well, when it comes to your portfolio, you want to present work that lines up with the freelance jobs you want, not necessarily the projects you currently have.

Let's say you specialize in logo design:

If that's what you want to be known for, then you should only show logo projects in your freelance portfolio.

That will be what attracts and helps potential clients decide to go with you instead of another freelance designer whose portfolio could be all over the place.

6. Be transparent with your customers

As a freelancer, your business is just you running it from the inside out.

That's something you should be proud of, so don't hide behind a facade:

Be the name and face of your business, because your business is you.

From a customer perspective, if I were to hire you to provide a service, I would like to know who I am giving my money to.

So be sure to inject who you are into your brand. You can shape that however you want, but the key is to be nice.

Also, when a client is interested in working with you, be transparent when talking to them.

If you're only accepting part-time freelance job opportunities, let them know.

Otherwise, you could run into a situation where expectations are not aligned and conflicts arise as a result.

If they are hiring you, explain how your process works.

Show your interest in them and their business, then discuss what they can expect by working with you step by step.

Being transparent is not a weakness, it helps build trust and may be what seals the deal on a proposed project.

7. Write, write, write

This is the most important advice I can give you to take your freelance work to the next level:

And that is writing.

I don't care if you don't think you're a good writer.

Writing is the doorway to getting your name out there, getting customers to find you, and truly growing as an individual and a freelancer.

Personally, I don't think I'm a great writer, and you can only imagine how it felt to write a year ago.

It comes with practice.

Everything I have accomplished in the past year I owe to my writing.

Everything I do, whether it's a blog post, newsletter, book, video, or email to a client, it all starts with writing.

For a complete rundown of why writing is a must for your freelance work, I highly recommend watching this video from Sean McCabe:

It all starts with writing

Hopefully after reading this post, you will see Sean's video and be convinced that you need to start writing right away.

8. Focus on the now

Watch your feet so you don't stumble while looking at the end goal.

You know where you want to be one day, so focus on what you can do now to end up there.

Too many freelancers become obsessed with envying who they aspire to be.

If you want to have a reliable customer base, a product that can help supplement your income, or if you don't want to have to depend on just one customer for a living, what are you doing today to make that happen?

Make a daily to-do list with small tasks that you can easily complete at the end of the day.

Progress is progress.

And if you start taking one step at a time toward your long-term goals:

The sooner I get there.

9. Know your numbers

Many freelancers manage themselves as contractors when in reality they should see themselves as small businesses.

Just because you work from home doesn't mean you're not a business owner, and every good business owner should know your numbers.

Such as:

• Business income (How much do you need to earn per month to live?)

• Site traffic (where does it come from? What is your most popular content?)

• Link conversion rates and content interactivity (What calls to action are working? Which pages are not getting views and need to be removed entirely?)

• The amount of time you spend on certain types of business activities (and how much you are estimating and / or charging)

Knowing these numbers will shed light on the areas that work for you and the areas that need improvement.

For instance:

Take a look at your monthly income.

Find out where your business income is coming from (which clients, type of projects, passive income) and focus more on those areas that are producing the most results.

If you are consistently making $ 100 + a month selling products in your Creative Marketshop, consider producing more items to sell.

See where most of your traffic is coming from or what type of content is most popular, then do more of that.

Another example:

If you're getting a lot of traffic from a guest post you wrote, reach out and write another guest post.

10. Divide your income between taxes and savings

If you are serious about freelancing, start separating your income and savings.

For every dollar I earn related to the business, I divide it like this:

• 12% to the business (for business-related expenses)

• 16% to business taxes (this will save my ass when tax time comes)

• 12% to personal savings

• What is left over goes to my personal checking account for living expenses.

I'm not saying this is the way to manage and divide your finances, but it is what works for me.

The important thing here is to allocate a minimum of 16% of every dollar earned to taxes.

It's the same concept of an employer taking taxes off your paycheck.

Once it is time to pay your taxes, you will use these savings to pay what you owe. (I recommend paying quarterly, so you don't get a big payment in April.)

MT Khan Thanks for the A2A.

When I tell people that I save on hard times working as a freelancer with Upwork, almost everyone wants to eat a piece of cake. Why not? Nobody hates a wad of extra money. However, the road is not so easy.

I started when they were good old plain days at oDesk. There were many customers (although the good ones were still few) and less interested. But, the rise of autonomous culture has given us all new competitors.

I got my first job, 5 years ago, after struggling for 5 months. I will write what worked for me and hope it works for you too. But, fee

Keep reading

MT Khan Thanks for the A2A.

When I tell people that I save on hard times working as a freelancer with Upwork, almost everyone wants to eat a piece of cake. Why not? Nobody hates a wad of extra money. However, the road is not so easy.

I started when they were good old plain days at oDesk. There were many customers (although the good ones were still few) and less interested. But, the rise of autonomous culture has given us all new competitors.

I got my first job, 5 years ago, after struggling for 5 months. I will write what worked for me and hope it works for you too. But feel free to apply your own mind too!

  1. You only get one chance to impress your client. Just one - be sure to use it and use it wisely. Make sure your portfolio is colorful, diverse, and includes a lot of work. If you have experience, use your previous works to show them in the portfolio, if it is new, read the next point.
  2. If you are starting out as a freelancer and have no references to show, then you have two options. One, create a free blog on wordpress and link it to your portfolio. Alternatively, you can submit your creative pieces just to give the customer an idea. For example, if you are a writer, write a couple of pieces of content: tech blogs, political commentary, creative fiction, prose, and poetry and upload them to the Upwork portfolio. Regardless of whether you did it for some client or for your own satisfaction, your potential client will have an idea of ​​your skill set. Two, read the next point.
  3. If you don't want to upload any content, focus on your cover letter. Instead of having a generic cover letter, try to personalize each offer that you focus on. Try to explain why you are the right person for the job, despite being relatively new. There are many people looking to hire new employees and give them good feedback, so their impression comes in the form of a great cover letter.
  4. If you get an “Active Nomination,” be sure to thank the client for considering you for the project. Out of between 30 and 60 proposals, he pre-selected you and that is something important. She has a head start, make her an employee with the right attitude and humility.

I hope this helps. All the best! :)

I think Upwork sucks for writers and here's why.

I will give you five reasons to support my claim.

Just to be perfectly clear. I'm not saying there aren't freelance writers who aren't doing well on Upwork. My point is that these successful freelance writers are the "minority report" on Upwork. In this case, they are more of an exception than a rule.

Reason n. 1: I have to bleed to bid.

As a freelance writer, you are doomed to be "one of a kind." Unless you find a client who needs new blog posts on a regular basis, you will jump from project to project. Unique concerts. That's what freelance writes

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I think Upwork sucks for writers and here's why.

I will give you five reasons to support my claim.

Just to be perfectly clear. I'm not saying there aren't freelance writers who aren't doing well on Upwork. My point is that these successful freelance writers are the "minority report" on Upwork. In this case, they are more of an exception than a rule.

Reason n. 1: I have to bleed to bid.

As a freelance writer, you are doomed to be "one of a kind." Unless you find a client who needs new blog posts on a regular basis, you will jump from project to project. Unique concerts. That's what freelance writing is mostly about. Finish writing content for a new website. You won't see that customer again until it's time to redesign your website.

As such, I need to "consume" a few offers each day. So what am I supposed to do now, when I have to pay for each connection that I have to pay to send my proposal? Usually you need two offers for a proposal. I have to be incredibly lucky or super creative or a perfect match or all of this to nail a project with almost all the proposals I present.

If you want to bid more, you have to pay more. At the end of your month of freelance writing at Upwork, you have hundreds of dollars to pay just to bid. The best of all. If you bid too many times without success, you can be permanently banned. That's lovely, but I have to move on to the next reason.

Reason n. # 2: Kill me gently with your initial freelance fee.

If you don't want to pay a 20% fee on Upwork indefinitely, then you have to catch a "whale." I'm talking about clients paying more than $ 10K per project, freelance, or year. In the waters of freelance writing, you don't see whales too often. I remember an independent "colleague" attacking me in the Upwork community with his responses to my comments. His "whales" were worth $ 50,000 or even $ 100,000 a year. When you read something like that, you feel like you are working for peanuts. Or maybe you weren't entirely honest about your "accomplishments." However, one thing was obvious: he was not a writer.

So that's it. I pay a 20% or 10% fee at best when I make more than $ 500. I really don't know how many writers pay a 5% fee for Upwork, but I'm definitely not one of them.

Reason # 3 - It's not fair that quality writing projects are so rare.

Upwork has mastered the art of self-promotion. The most densely populated platform with superlatives in the world, if you ask me. And then you come across a series of project descriptions where you are expected to write the artworks for five or ten dollars. It would be acceptable to me if one in ten writing projects available on Upwork could be labeled "decent." The problem is that you can say that in only one in twenty or fifty projects.

I am a freelance professional. Whatever that is supposed to mean to you. I don't have a plan B. I'm desperate by default, but I have my limits. I'm not that desperate. I'd rather work on a construction site than write an article or page for five dollars. Where are all those high-quality writing projects on Upwork? Either I don't see them or the best writing seats are already taken.

Reason # 4 - Who cares if you are creative if you are not a native?

This reason does not necessarily apply to all writers who work at Upwork. I have no problem when a client insists on hiring a native writer. That is your prerogative. What I do care a lot about, however, is a client lecturing me on writing that is reserved for native speakers, but can't tell the difference between "his" and "is." That's something I call the flag power syndrome. If you can change a brand associated with your account, you can change your client's perception of your writing skills before you even start working on your project. One of my self-employed friends moved to Australia. Guess what? He became a native writer. What happened to not judging a book by its cover and a freelance writer by their account banner?

Reason # 5 - The last thing Upwork needs is a new writer on board.

Ah, the famous “Dear John” letter that Upwork sends out to all the new freelancers trying to go through the registration process:

"Unfortunately, at this time there are already many freelancers with similar skills to yours and we cannot accept their registration."

I did a little experiment on Upwork. My cousin applied as a new freelance writer. Of course, it was immediately rejected. Then he applied again, but this time as a developer. Guess what happened. This time it was accepted. The problem was, you can't sign up as a developer and then work as a writer. So, you closed your Upwork account before you even made your first offer.

There is a possibility that something has changed in the meantime. However, I'm pretty sure Upwork has more writers than it needs. Most worryingly, clients must decide who to hire or not. So decides Upwork. What happened to the free, open and impartial freelance market with equal opportunities for all?

And the moral of my story is?

Fair is fair, Upwork isn't bullshit for all writers. I used to work at Upwork. My point is that this platform fails in a particular category for the unacceptably high percentage of freelance writers.

I always like to say that self-employment is for everyone, but not everyone can be self-employed. The same applies to freelance writing. It's been a while since I got my college degree, but I clearly remember something called laissez-faire economics. That's what capitalism is all about. Or, in simple language, let me do my job. When the "government" (Upwork) interferes too much and ruins your business, then we have a problem.

Upwork consistently and purposefully makes life difficult for the vast majority of freelance writers. That is the only point I wanted to make. Upwork could and should be a much better place for writers.

That's all independent people who write for a living.

Upwork is often one of the first independent platforms that come to mind. But what some see as your strengths can also be seen as weaknesses: With a lack of specialization and a standardized group, it can be harder, not easier, to find the specific type of freelancer you're looking for. So to explore all the options, it's best to have a few Upwork alternatives in your back pocket.

If you are looking for inexperienced or inexperienced workers, you can find them on Fiverr. If you can handle it, you may find a lot. Just remember, you get what you pay for, so the $ 5 logo design won't be as good as or

Keep reading

Upwork is often one of the first independent platforms that come to mind. But what some see as your strengths can also be seen as weaknesses: With a lack of specialization and a standardized group, it can be harder, not easier, to find the specific type of freelancer you're looking for. So to explore all the options, it's best to have a few Upwork alternatives in your back pocket.

If you are looking for inexperienced or inexperienced workers, you can find them on Fiverr. If you can handle it, you may find a lot. Just remember, you get what you pay for, so the $ 5 logo design won't be as good as one at the market price.

There are many options available on fiverr, you have to choose which one you are so perfect on.

I personally recommend fiverr, which is the best for novice freelancers.

I wish you good luck, it continues to grow every day.

How to create an account and earn money on Fiverr This article is about the Feverr website (www.Fiverr.com), how to create an account there and earn money from that site and there are many things besides that. To do this, you must read this article. Https://paidforarticles.com/how-to-create-an-account-and-earn-money-on-fiverr-58938

Last time I checked these two platforms, I think only Freelancer allows you to work anonymously. That is, you can use an avatar or some other image instead of the profile image of your real person. You don't even have to use your real name. On the other hand, we have Upwork with its rigorous policy regarding identity verification.

My best guess is that Upwork wants to strengthen its credibility with the strong message it sends to customers. Real and trusted people work here. Freelancer obviously wants its users to feel more comfortable. They care more about privacy p

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Last time I checked these two platforms, I think only Freelancer allows you to work anonymously. That is, you can use an avatar or some other image instead of the profile image of your real person. You don't even have to use your real name. On the other hand, we have Upwork with its rigorous policy regarding identity verification.

My best guess is that Upwork wants to strengthen its credibility with the strong message it sends to the clients. The real and trustworthy people work here. Freelancer obviously wants to make its users feel more comfortable. They care more about privacy protection than potential credibility issues.

In the essence, both of these approaches are fully legit. Also, let’s face it. Is there such thing as an opportunity to exist online anonymously? I think that is simply impossible to ensure the full anonymity and privacy protection if you’re doing something online.

If you want to work as a freelance graphic designer, I’m afraid you will have to sacrifice a bit of your privacy and anonymity. I think that this “sacrifice” will be worth all the freedom and money you will get in return.

Give it a GO!

Happens. I had to terminate a project contract several years ago because I got sick.

The best thing to do is to be honest with the customer as soon as possible.

Because you are a freelancer and Upwork is strict about the person who hires the work doing the work (meaning you can't outsource it), you need to do what you can to gracefully exit the contract.

First, send a note of apology to the customer. You have made this customer uncomfortable, so do what you can to make termination of the contract as easy as possible.

Tell them that you will end the contract and authorize a refund of the escrow money. You are

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Happens. I had to terminate a project contract several years ago because I got sick.

The best thing to do is to be honest with the customer as soon as possible.

Because you are a freelancer and Upwork is strict about the person who hires the work doing the work (meaning you can't outsource it), you need to do what you can to gracefully exit the contract.

First, send a note of apology to the customer. You have made this customer uncomfortable, so do what you can to make termination of the contract as easy as possible.

Dígales que terminará el contrato y autorizará un reembolso del dinero del depósito en garantía. No está obligado a reembolsar los hitos anteriores en los que entregó el trabajo.

Deje comentarios para el cliente diciendo lo buenos que fueron.

You will get a hit on your JSS, both from the refund and the probable negative feedback given by the client that take six months of good work to erase.

Otherwise, nothing bad will happen to you, especially if you continue to get contracts and continue to earn money for Upwork. That’s what makes them happy.

Yes. It takes some half an hour to swipe through a 24-hour job listing, a minute to pick among the three or four chosen jobs, up to an hour on average to write and send a proposal and that’s it. By the end of that day, the message arrives and negotiations being.

I average at a 100% response rate and a 75% conversion rate. That's to say, I get a response every time but only 3/4 of all proposals result in contracts, most commonly because we fail to agree on the fee.

Compared to other freelancers in my category, that looks like this:

And on average it takes less than 48 hours to organize everything

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Yes. It takes about half an hour to scroll through a 24-hour job listing, a minute to choose from three or four chosen jobs, up to an hour on average to write and submit a proposal and that's it. At the end of that day, the message arrives and the negotiations begin.

Hago un promedio de una tasa de respuesta del 100% y una tasa de conversión del 75%. Es decir, siempre recibo una respuesta, pero solo 3/4 de todas las propuestas resultan en contratos, más comúnmente porque no llegamos a un acuerdo sobre la tarifa.

En comparación con otros autónomos de mi categoría, se ve así:

Y, en promedio, se necesitan menos de 48 horas para arreglar todo y firmar el contrato.

En mi libro, eso es fácil.

PD: Soy consciente de que este gráfico muestra aprox. 90% CR pero según mis cálculos, es 75%. Puede ser que esté equivocado…

Me tomó un mes y medio encontrar mi primer trabajo en UpWork. Ahora soy un profesional independiente de primera categoría que conoce todos los entresijos de esta plataforma.

The answer to the question: how many proposals to submit depends on the relevance of the work. If you think the job title is relevant to your skills, go ahead and submit a proposal. But if there is at least one aspect that is keeping you from applying for a job, don't waste your connections.

There are many tips that I can give you. In fact, I created a YouTube channel where I share all my tips and tricks as a freelancer. This video should help you:

Keep reading

It took me a month and a half to find my first job at UpWork. I am now a top-notch freelancer who knows all the ins and outs of this platform.

The answer to the question: how many proposals to submit depends on the relevance of the work. If you think the job title is relevant to your skills, go ahead and submit a proposal. But if there is at least one aspect that is keeping you from applying for a job, don't waste your connections.

There are many tips that I can give you. In fact, I created a YouTube channel where I share all my tips and tricks as a freelancer. This video should help you:

Hi Jasser… What is your skill set?

Getting into Upwork is more difficult because there are about 2 million freelancers there, and the reality is that only 5% are making a lot of money.

Hence they are limiting acceptance for now unless you have a skill set that is short of supply.

Go to LinkedIn and post your credentials there , and if the client has a job posting at Upwork, kindly tell him to invite you to his job post. Then you can get in.

What is your skill set please?

UpWork is a freelancing website. They act as the middle man between freelancers and clients. UpWork at one time used to be called oDesk and very soon will have the full merger of Elance incorporated into them as well. They have freelance project listings for a variety of freelance skills: writing, editing, proofreading, copywriting/copyediting, IT, HR, accounting, data entry, customer service, coding, graphic/logo design, and so much more.

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