What's the best way to get a part-time programming job?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Byron Snow



What's the best way to get a part-time programming job?

I've given this some thought, and although I was never able to get it to work, this is what I realized:

1. Maintenance contract - Obtain a maintenance contract for a system that requires about half a person. From the looks of it, this is probably what you're looking for. The problem with this is that the people who get maintenance contracts are usually the developers who wrote the system in the first place. If you've ever heard of someone living the lifestyle you're talking about, this is probably what they have. But for you to have a half person maintenance contract, the project will have

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I've given this some thought, and although I was never able to get it to work, this is what I realized:

1. Maintenance contract - Obtain a maintenance contract for a system that requires about half a person. From the looks of it, this is probably what you're looking for. The problem with this is that the people who get maintenance contracts are usually the developers who wrote the system in the first place. If you've ever heard of someone living the lifestyle you're talking about, this is probably what they have. But for you to have a half person maintenance contract, the project will have been a big multi-developer project for your employer to get the contract, the client to have a serious new job that won't last forever, or you screwed up and wrote a buggy app. Another problem with this is that the longer the project lasts,

2. Create a SaaS application - Create a SaaS application to find enough customers to pay their bills and maintain it. If you build it right, the maintenance shouldn't be too demanding, but therein lies the whole problem / solution and the product / market fit problem. You will have to do a significant amount of work up front, spending time learning the business and marketing side with no guarantee of success.

3. Become an 'expert' - Your gigs will be shorter and more intense, but your time and income will balance out what you are looking for. The problem with this is that your downtime will be spent marketing (writing and teaching) and staying on top of the skill set.

4. Move to a more advisory role: If you can find a niche where you can add a lot of value, you may be able to. However, you will not do a lot of development work and will have a significant change in skill set to move into this type of role.

Unfortunately, with our skill set, people want all the time you have, or nothing at all.

First, let me lay out a few challenges why this is difficult. Most Indian companies prohibit "dual employment" which is sometimes valid in the US, Australia and some other western countries. Consult your legal and employment contract for words such as: ** You will not participate in any outside activity of a commercial nature. ** You will not engage in non-commercial activities without the prior written approval of the company

Even if you cross the legal step, the next questions are Income Tax with both jobs, Intellectual Property / Conflict of Interest (between 2 employers) and

The third challenge is can you

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First, let me lay out a few challenges why this is difficult. Most Indian companies prohibit "dual employment" which is sometimes valid in the US, Australia and some other western countries. Consult your legal and employment contract for words such as: ** You will not participate in any outside activity of a commercial nature. ** You will not engage in non-commercial activities without the prior written approval of the company

Even if you cross the legal step, the next questions are Income Tax with both jobs, Intellectual Property / Conflict of Interest (between 2 employers) and

The third challenge is can you maintain the same level of commitment / performance and results over a long period of time and maintain the balance between work life, commute and context change?

Having said that, I know that some of my colleagues / friends persuaded their employers to allow them to work part time (and earn money) in some of these areas:

1. Write technology books or teach part-time in schools or speak at conferences (as long as they can meet the main needs of your employer).
2. Invest your savings "wisely" in the stock markets, which requires a fair amount of time and research
3. Play in sports leagues, perform as keyboard players, DJ at night parties, and help coordinate events
4. Be critical Movie, TV show Anchor or YouTube Channels (with ads)
5. Help with family and friends businesses, including part-time cashier at the front desk.
6. Make Android or iOS games and sell them (and they finally quit their main job to take up this career).

and I can go on and on ...

Persuade your employer by demonstrating:
1. You have no conflict of interest
2. Doing your main job smoothly.
3. your field of passion and long-term goal

** Addendum: You can also consider working more than 40 hours and getting paid more for being the best working employee. Or switch to a job that pays you for overtime.

Since you are trying to free up time for hobbies and personal interests and not for business activities, your employment contract and non-compete clauses should not be a problem. (Unless there is a conflict of interest. I have seen employers get angry that staff programmers contribute code to community projects).

The first step would be to speak with your human resources department. Many employers actively welcome part-time and flex-time workers. They save on salary, benefits, etc. and they get the benefits of retaining your knowledge and experience without paying you a full-time salary. You may also be able to

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Since you are trying to free up time for hobbies and personal interests and not for business activities, your employment contract and non-compete clauses should not be a problem. (Unless there is a conflict of interest. I have seen employers get angry that staff programmers contribute code to community projects).

The first step would be to speak with your human resources department. Many employers actively welcome part-time and flex-time workers. They save on salary, benefits, etc. and they get the benefits of retaining your knowledge and experience without paying you a full-time salary. You may also be able to work on some kind of short-term arrangement where you can see if it really works for both you and your employer.

If the request comes from the employee, it is "accommodation" and the employer is seen as the good guy and reaps the benefits.

If it is the employer asking you to reduce your hours, you are considered cheap, trying to avoid paying benefits, abusing employees, etc.

See "The Four Hour Work Week" by Tim Ferris. This is essentially the same topic that you are talking about; Spending the productive, high-energy, and healthy years of your life working more than 40 hours a week at a job in hopes of one day being able to pursue your passions.

1) Independent. I find this more difficult than the normal 40 hour week for a regular paycheck, due to the marketing / sales part and the collection part, but some people do quite well at this.

2) Make a deal with your employer. You already have a lot of time to play the guitar and write. The journey is more troublesome. Request two consecutive months of unpaid vacation per year, or whatever works for you.

3) Sabbath break or between jobs. Request a gap year every 3-4 years. Given how often people change jobs in tech, that's as long as you could stay in any job at any time.

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1) Independent. I find this more difficult than the normal 40 hour week for a regular paycheck, due to the marketing / sales part and the collection part, but some people do quite well at this.

2) Make a deal with your employer. You already have a lot of time to play the guitar and write. The journey is more troublesome. Request two consecutive months of unpaid vacation per year, or whatever works for you.

3) Sabbath break or between jobs. Request a gap year every 3-4 years. Given how often people change jobs in tech, that's as long as you could stay in any job anyway. Work for 3 years, take a year off between jobs, then come back and work for another 3 elsewhere, or whatever suits your needs.

The best way is for someone to offer you a part-time job, ask how much you want to be paid, and then insist that that's not enough. That happened to me, and it was absolutely the best, completely amazing.

However, finding part-time work is all about networking. There are online platforms, of course, but… YMMV. What I recommend is networking. Join a local user group or hacking space or volunteer community (for example, through Meetup.com). Talk to people. Express interest. You have work that you can show.

13 best programming job sites

"Get It Now: How You Can Make $ 8.5 Million Per Year Online With E-Books".

  1. Turing (dot) com
  2. Jobstreet (dot) com
  3. Workopolis (dot) com
  4. Weworkremotely (dot) com
  5. Flexjobs (dot) com
  6. Jobs (dot) laimoon (dot) com
  7. Monster (dot) com
  8. In fact (dot) com
  9. Simplyhired (dot) com
  10. Freelancer (dot) com
  11. Ziprecruiter (dot) com
  12. Workplace (dot) co (dot) united kingdom
  13. Jooble (period) org.

Create an online portfolio to showcase your work. Then sign up with various freelance sites and start looking for jobs. Prepare to compete with other freelancers as well, unless you have a prominent profile, clients come to you instead.

Other people are finding part-time developer jobs, so there is something different about you.

You haven't given much detail in your question, but here are some guesses.

1) His skill level is still not high enough to make him stand out clearly from the crowd.

2) You have not made your name public. Potential customers don't know about you.

3) You have not put together a portfolio to show your skills.


Here's a question that suggests a different approach to the problem:

What types of clients are you trying to work for?

Software companies or business in general?

If your skills and marketing are still not up to scratch

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Other people are finding part-time developer jobs, so there is something different about you.

You haven't given much detail in your question, but here are some guesses.

1) His skill level is still not high enough to make him stand out clearly from the crowd.

2) You have not made your name public. Potential customers don't know about you.

3) You have not put together a portfolio to show your skills.


Here's a question that suggests a different approach to the problem:

What types of clients are you trying to work for?

Software companies or business in general?

If your skills and marketing are not yet at the required levels, you will have a hard time finding contract work for software companies.

Typically, contractors are hired to meet a specific need or to get something done quickly. Their skill level is often (but not always) higher than that of full-time developers. Or their skill level may not be higher, but they may be better in some specific language, code library, etc.

If this is your situation, try building software for business, not software business.

You need a wide range of skills to do this (requirements gathering, UI design, database, code, etc.) but the skills don't necessarily have to be very deep.

For example, learn how to create clean, easy-to-use Microsoft Access databases.

Help a nail salon automate their clients' email list.

Help a gym manage their Google AdWords account.

Have a cup of coffee with some coffee dripping from the bottom. Press it onto a paper map of your city. Now take the cup of coffee, leaving a ring.

How many software companies are within that circle?

How many companies that need some kind of technical help are within that circle?

You may be surprised to learn that until your skill level is very high, commercial jobs pay more than software company jobs.

If I walk into a software company and tell them that I can create a website that allows them to browse millions of customer records and find any customer by name instantly, they will laugh at me.

If I do the same with a company that needs this service, they may treat me like a magician.

Give it a try and let us know how it goes!

I can't think of any full-time programming job that allows you to work 4 hours a day. In reality, as with most salaried positions, it is very likely that you work much more than full time.

Your best bet is to work part-time, accept the lowest wage (or hourly rate), and make a living from it.

I guess what you're really asking is, "How can I make good money developing myself without spending my life in an office?"

Freelancing is a great way to go, but it's competitive, and unless you network with the right people, you may be competing with cheap talent. Avoid making $ 500 Wor

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I can't think of any full-time programming job that allows you to work 4 hours a day. In reality, as with most salaried positions, it is very likely that you work much more than full time.

Your best bet is to work part-time, accept the lowest wage (or hourly rate), and make a living from it.

I guess what you're really asking is, "How can I make good money developing myself without spending my life in an office?"

Freelancing is a great way to go, but it's competitive, and unless you network with the right people, you may be competing with cheap talent. Avoid making $ 500 Wordpress sites unless you really enjoy doing them and can get them up and running quickly.

Another option is to work for a company part time. I don't know much about part-time development jobs and how available they are, but I suspect you might find more than a few options. If you can secure a good hourly rate, you could earn a decent salary and have plenty of time to yourself.

Finally, the best option I know of is to start a business. Develop a product or service that you can sell enough to make a living. Is there an interesting service that people want to use and will pay for? Build it, integrate Stripe, and see what happens. Even if it takes you a few years, you might be able to prepare well. In the meantime, there are many ways you can earn the important extra dollar.

There are many possibilities!

It depends on the type of software you are writing. I got a lot of business on the web by offering to develop a site for free to some of the larger local businesses, as long as I could put my contact information in fine print at the bottom, you know, site developed by me @ my. com kind of things. (I had to explain to them that they had to pay for the domain name and hosting, but that's what they had to do: I'd just write the site, get it up and running, and maintain it like maintaining the DENY list in Apache). After about 4 sites I was able to tell people that A, B, C and D had sites created by me, they would look like a

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It depends on the type of software you are writing. I got a lot of business on the web by offering to develop a site for free to some of the larger local businesses, as long as I could put my contact information in fine print at the bottom, you know, site developed by me @ my. com kind of things. (I had to explain to them that they had to pay for the domain name and hosting, but that's what they had to do: I'd just write the site, get it up and running, and maintain it like maintaining the DENY list in Apache). After about 4 sites I was able to tell people that A, B, C and D had sites created by me, they would search and many of them hired me. (And I kept my day job. Freelancng doesn't come with a check every week, grocery bills need one.)

Hello there ….

  1. You can do freelance work online. There are many freelance job sites available where you can bid on a particular project. Initially, you may not have good money, but as soon as people give a good review about your projects, you will get good projects and you will be able to earn more money in your free time.You can register many portals for freelance such as: Freelancer - Hire & Find jobs
  2. If you know Android, you can create your own application. You can publish it on Play Store. Check this link: How much money can I earn with my application published in the Google Play store?
  3. You can create your own
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Hello there ….

  1. You can do freelance work online. There are many freelance job sites available where you can bid on a particular project. Initially, you may not have good money, but as soon as people give a good review about your projects, you will get good projects and you will be able to earn more money in your free time.You can register many portals for freelance such as: Freelancer - Hire & Find jobs
  2. If you know Android, you can create your own application. You can publish it on Play Store. Check this link: How much money can I earn with my application published in the Google Play store?
  3. You can create your own websites and blogs on the technology you know. You can earn a lot of money by providing a good solution on the latest problems and their solution related to your known technology. For a blog idea, you can check out this Quora link: On average, how much do Indian bloggers earn per month?

Hope this answer helps you.

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