What's the best summer job for a teenager in high school?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Tom Hall



What's the best summer job for a teenager in high school?

In my opinion, finding a summer job is helpful for your development because you start to create a work ethic. It may be easier for you if one of your uncles / aunts or any other family member runs a business and asks for your help. It is advantageous because you can trust them and can be integrated more easily. Anything from a garage, ice cream parlor, burger / shaworma shop can help and in case you enjoy it, who knows, chances are you will find a new hobby or passion.

Explore, try to find multiple possibilities and work hard. You will learn from that. Sincerely.

I will give you some examples of jobs you could do. And for the ones I've personally done, I'll write some thoughts on them so you know roughly what to expect. I have also divided the jobs into self-employed and non-self-employed jobs.

NON-INDEPENDENT JOBS:

1. Distribution of brochures

Being there handing out flyers for 8 hours is not exactly fun, but what it did teach me is patience and dealing with rejection as a lot of people get irritated with you, it will also give you an idea of ​​a boring job and therefore you will motivate just as it had motivated me not to stop doing something like

Keep reading

I will give you some examples of jobs you could do. And for the ones I've personally done, I'll write some thoughts on them so you know roughly what to expect. I have also divided the jobs into self-employed and non-self-employed jobs.

NON-INDEPENDENT JOBS:

1. Distribution of brochures

Being there handing out flyers for 8 hours isn't exactly fun, but what it did teach me is patience and how to deal with rejection as a lot of people get irritated with you, it will also give you an insight into a boring job and therefore , it will motivate you just as it had motivated me not to end up doing something like that in the future, after that job, I would always tell myself that if I don't keep improving, that's what would get me and that scared the shit out of me and pushed me to go do more work.

2 waiters and banquets

This is fun. You get to meet a lot of new people that you wouldn't have met otherwise, in fact I met some people that I went back to work with later. Also, the waiter taught me a lot about how to deal with customers, especially angry or even abusive ones, in terms of how to talk to them, how to serve them, and also how to handle criticism and comments appropriately. I see this as an invaluable lesson, as in the future if you don't know how to treat your customers or handle and then respond to feedback, you are in real trouble. Also on the fun side of things, I was able to explore the hotel in its entirety, seeing places that I would not have seen and also meeting clients that I would not have met otherwise, that would be very useful contacts in the future. This one also taught me a bit about F&B. How to organize people, how to motivate them, how to make sure work is done always and to a good standard. It also gave me an idea of ​​the management structure of these types of companies, who responds to whom, etc. and it also allowed me to see what each person's work involved and how they would do it. A very good insight into the food and beverage industry.

3. Marketing executive

This is one of my favorites. You may think that this may be unattainable due to lack of workplace experience etc, but it is not. Target some really small or new businesses that really need people or others that don't have a full department, like in this case, marketing. And just for the record, before I got this job, all I had was my IGCSE exam report card, nothing more, in fact, the guy didn't even ask me for any credentials. So take the lesson, which you'll never know until you try, just go out there, bite your lip, and get the job.

It was a great job with incredible knowledge and experience. During this (ongoing) time, I was basically working for an interior design and renovation company that had essentially no digitization or online presence of any kind. My job started simply as advertising and looking for new clients who wanted home improvements. I would post ads on different sites, suggest things through word of mouth, and also make some cold calls to gather new clients who would like to rebuild their houses in exchange for a% commission. Later, along with one of my best friends, they asked me to start bringing online presence (we were the only two types of marketers in the company), as you can see now, we started juggling two jobs, both marketing and prospecting for new customers. I continued to run ads and get a couple of inquiries and closing deals from time to time, ad serving and customer prospecting taught me things like writing your ads in an attractive way and also serving substantial content in your ads to build trust among customers. potentials. Useful stuff but not adequate experience as a whole

However, the real learning came from the online marketing experience. I learned so many things that maybe I only learned in 5 years when I took my finger out of my butt, however this opportunity taught me things early on that I think would be invaluable later on in my ambitions of going into business / entrepreneurship, especially this one. digital age. The experience taught me about content marketing, how to eliminate clutter and keep putting better and better content. I started writing articles for the company that would be useful to consumers and hopefully translate into sales. I learned about SEO (how to make my website have better search rankings in Google) so that more people can locate the website and also drive traffic to it effectively. I learned how to use analytics to track progress and constantly improve my campaign. I learned how to use CMS to create attractive websites also without coding (Website Development). This also gave me the opportunity to run a social media marketing campaign, giving me insight into what worked and what didn't, and what consumers would respond to and what they didn't like. This opportunity also allowed me to see the market prices for home improvement in the country, which led me to save my family a lot of money when a contractor came up and tried to scam my family. Overall, this experience gave me an opportunity to learn more about the internet and what happens online, and it also taught me a bit about how online marketing works and how it could improve. Without this job I would never have opened my eyes to this online marketing and would probably only learn these things in a few years (when it really mattered), while others my age were already geniuses at it. .

4. Sales executive

Another one of my favorites. This job taught me a lot in my ambition to be a great salesperson. I also had the opportunity to meet other people I would never have met otherwise, such as full-time programmers, designers, and other salespeople, and it also gave me my first experience of true corporate life. If you are outgoing and enjoy persuading and talking to people, this type of work will be great for you.

My job here was to sell B2B to F&B establishments a custom restaurant mobile app that was created by a group of Indian programmers who were also part of the company. He needed to cold call and email potential restaurants that might have been interested in him. Later he would have to arrange a meeting with the manager of the establishment and try to sell the application to his company. This was an extremely fun job, especially the meeting with the heads of the restaurant and all the sales part that is exciting, especially when a deal is closed. As for the telemarketing part of the job, it taught me a lot about how to handle severe rejection, especially when telemarketing you're hung up 90% of the time.

This was also a job that I had been dying for because I knew I would be successful later on, especially in my business ambitions, I would have to know how to sell things, otherwise I would die a slow and painful death.

First of all, this work squashed my earlier take on salespeople as charismatic people who just mix, have a killer speech, make the guy drool, and then sell you the product and show off on commission in 30 seconds.

I also had the opportunity to attend company funded seminars / talks on how to be a better seller and what not, and also to deepen my understanding of the product and the areas to cover or target when trying to sell the product to a specific group of customers. , etc. ... I learned a lot about patience, especially in difficult situations (I am impatient by nature), dealing with difficult questions or even criticism from customers, and how to respond appropriately and quickly without sounding like an idiot. And also how to behave and improve my speaking skills in general.

And again, not to mention the contacts I made while working there, from managers, designers, programmers, or just desk workers who could share with me what their experiences are like.

If I hadn't gotten this job, I would never have learned the vast things that I had the opportunity to learn in terms of sales techniques, and also just by building networks with both my clients and my coworkers.

5. Retail assistant:

My job at the chocolate retail store was to help customers with their purchases and make sure the shelves were neat and clean and that we had enough inventory. Although I learned a lot of valuable lessons and got some great ideas, the foundational work itself wasn't particularly fun or challenging, especially during periods when there are no customers or they don't need help and you end up just walking around the store in limbo.


INDEPENDENT WORKS:

- WEB DEVELOPMENT

This is a great skill to have in life and it can also be very financially rewarding. There is an endless supply of people, at least for the foreseeable future, who need help building a website or who need some work related to web development so that you always have the opportunity to get jobs in freelance communities that pay quite well in addition to that. .

Even outside of the autonomous communities, there are tons of small micro or small businesses in your neighborhood or area or whatever that also need help getting a company website or having some kind of website for clients. On the other hand, you can connect with these people. They didn't care about your age as long as you do the work, plus you don't technically work for them, you just made an informal arrangement. Yes, you have some learning that you must learn to catch up, but it will be worth it and reap its rewards. Trust me.

- SEO & DIGITAL MARKETING.

Another fantastic skill especially in a world dominated by the internet. Like web development, this is another skill that seems to have an endless supply of people, at least for the foreseeable future, demanding both in autonomous communities and among small businesses. All entrepreneurs want to be on the first page of Google, they want a good reach on social media, they want to interact with their audience, they want to build their brand online, implement content marketing, etc. Often they don't have the time or don't know how to do it at all. This is where you can come in and offer your services. Note that these also pay quite well.

However, again, you will have to learn and acquire these skills to a business standard in order to monetize effectively. Will it take time and hard work to learn? Hell yeah! Will it be worth the time invested? Hell yeah! If you have pure ambition, nothing can stop you from going from point A to B. If you want to earn money and have a job like no other 14-year-old, behave and learn like no other 14-year-old.

- DESIGN.

Yet another fantastic skill to have, not to mention profitable. Having the skills of a web developer, digital marketer, and designer together makes for an amazing combination. You will literally be a wrecking ball. If you can do all three right, people will fight for you to be the guy who works on their projects. From first needing to hire 3 people to cover these aspects, now they have a 14 year old 3 in 1 beast they can trust. I'm still trying to think of a better freelancer that I can hire.

Again, there are tons of people who don't know how to use design software (Photoshop, Illustrator, Sketch, Final Cut, Premiere, etc.) or may not have the time to do so. Masses and masses of people both online and offline. Like the previous two skills, there seems to be an endless supply of people for the foreseeable future who need help designing things, which is again where you can step in and continually fill that void. Obviously, this will require some substantial learning as well, but again, it will pay off in the long run both for doing work for others and for your own endeavors. Remember, you have time. Also, how much easier would it be to attract clients if they want design services, but can you also add some web development or SEO? You immediately become a more attractive person to work with.

- COPYWRITING.

Learn some copywriting. It's another brilliant and in-demand skill, especially at a young age when you have plenty of time to practice. A lot of people can't write a copy for shit and they will reach out and be willing to make a lot of money (I've heard of people who can charge $ 80-100 + for 500 words) to get a good copy of their products and what not.

If you don't know what it is, copywriting is basically writing something like a 'sales pitch' on ads, websites (online), etc. that gets potential customers and customers to take action, whether it's to buy something. or subscribe, depending on the seller. It goes without saying that writing good copy is a skill that needs to be practiced, analyzed and learned, so once again you will have to invest time and hard work to master this; However, it goes without saying once again, it is a skill that is absolutely worth having. A great skill for you, but also one that is demanded and can be easily monetized both with independent online search engines and with small businesses and startups that need to push their product.

If you're not sure how to get clients, here are some things you can try:

- Offer to speak on the phone or Skype with them to discuss exactly what you will do for them and give them a breakdown of the costs you will charge them. This helps the potential client feel more comfortable and happy working with you because you have really made the effort to make contact with them and are keeping them informed. I would definitely feel a little awkward if I was paying a guy that I can't even see on the other end and who I have no idea why they are charging me what they charge. Don't let your clients feel that. Leave those thoughts at rest. Establish trust the first time you make contact and build on it. I prefer to work with someone with less experience but who I can trust rather than someone who could be better but who I cannot trust at all. Consumer confidence online is fragile, especially when it comes to money. Put those fears to rest.

- Offer some small services for free to establish a relationship that you are not there to rip them off. Offer to submit work samples or drafts of what you are going to do before you start on the really paid stuff. This helps build confidence that you are genuine and legitimate and that you want to help them. Doing a few things for free also helps build a portfolio, which is crucial. You may think that doing things for free the first few times defeats the purpose of making money. You don't though, think long-term instead of short-term, make small short-term sacrifices, and in the long run, you will reap the benefits and your returns will be better rather than if you try to start annoying people with the starting price. If you sow generosity, you will reap generosity.

- Talk to your customers not as objects or business partners with whom you earn money, but as human beings and friends whom you are trying to help solve a problem. Again, it helps the trust aspect of the deal and also allows your client to sleep soundly knowing that their money has gone to someone with whom they have little more than a business relationship.

- Offer your customers discounts if they return or discounts for their friends. It gives them a sense of exclusivity that everyone loves.

- Just do your job well and to the best of your ability. Nothing is a better motivator for customers to come to you than a job well done. Everyone has to start somewhere. What matters is what you do once you start. Also keep in mind that people are willing to pay for quality. Maybe you can say that your programming skills are not great or that you do not know digital marketing. That's fine. Start learning them and improving your application to the point of commercial use. Dont be lazy. Nothing worthwhile is easy, definitely not money. Work hard now to learn it, and in the long run, you will appreciate it. Remember, you are 14 years old, you have time!

Hope this helped!

Hello all the girls, we as teenagers have a lot going on around us. Since boys also have the question of what girls think, let me introduce you to the feelings of a boy.

Here are 10 things that happen, we wish the girls understood.

  1. We are not sex maniacs all the time. Yes, sometimes it also happens with us. We are reaching puberty, so it is somewhat difficult to fight hormones. But we also have feelings, we also feel those butterflies in our guts sometimes. We can look at your face like it has no end ...
  2. Many of us are not financially stable and secure until now. Yes girls
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Hello all the girls, we as teenagers have a lot going on around us. Since boys also have the question of what girls think, let me introduce you to the feelings of a boy.

Here are 10 things that happen, we wish the girls understood.

  1. We are not sex maniacs all the time. Yes, sometimes it also happens with us. We are reaching puberty, so it is somewhat difficult to fight hormones. But we also have feelings, we also feel those butterflies in our guts sometimes. We can look at your face like it has no end ...
  2. Many of us are not financially stable and secure until now. Yes girls, if you want to date a rich man and live happily and safely, you can. But loving a teenager means that there are some (or lots) of pain, hesitation, destruction in his life. We will try to protect you from that by all means, but sometimes, we just need a heart to listen!
  3. Yes, girls, we boys care. Some wrong people are there, but we care who we love. A boy who gives you his heart, will take care of you. Let him put your hair down, feeding you sometime like a princess, he will care about you.
  4. We also cry…. But silently alone. We never let you have a clue of the coming storm. We have a general tendency to protect you to cover you by all means.
  5. Some eyeliner, lipstick, and a strand of kajal, fuck you look like a princess! Just a little black in your eyes and a slight red on the lips, girl, you don't need those foundations to look gorgeous!
  6. Like us, many girls just play with boys. Please do not do that. We are also human. Do not play with our feelings, we have to go through many casualties in life to be stable again.
  7. Yes, we check it often. Sometimes you can see it. Sometimes you can't. We watch a girl when she is busy with other things or gossiping with your friends. Dammit! Your smile, your sweet face can melt us like butter!
  8. We also feel mood swings! And sometimes we need a lap to sleep like innocents. Yes girls, let's face it. Life hits us hard. So much so that sometimes it gets out of control. Please be there for us. We just need a break on your lap to be happy again!
  9. We can give you unconditional love. The sweetest thing in the world! Our brains have not matured to become diplomatic and two-faced. We say what we think. Yah, sometime it gets painful. But you know what? We have the simplicity to tell you everything. We cannot hide or seek.
  10. We know a little about the girl stuff. How about eyeliner, kajal, mascara, eyeshadow, foundation, toner, bleach? :-P And we'll ask you when we don't know! We are curious how you tie your hair perfectly, you wear that saree with ease.

Here are 10 things that are always on our minds!

*** With a sweet smile ***

Soumya

I hate to tell you this, but at 17, if you're in a city with at least 10,000 people, almost every job that pays around the minimum wage would be easy to get if you tried legitimately. I'm not talking about sending a sloppy resume; I mean go after them.

First of all, I hope you have the following: decent grades (although amazing grades would help), respectable attire, and a reliable form of transportation to and from all potential jobs. Is that done? Well, read on to the end until the up vote button.

Now, use Google to find all the possible places that could be hiring people with your qualifications.

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I hate to tell you this, but at 17, if you're in a city with at least 10,000 people, almost every job that pays around the minimum wage would be easy to get if you tried legitimately. I'm not talking about sending a sloppy resume; I mean go after them.

First of all, I hope you have the following: decent grades (although amazing grades would help), respectable attire, and a reliable form of transportation to and from all potential jobs. Is that done? Well, read on to the end until the up vote button.

Now, use Google to find all the possible places that could be hiring people with your qualifications within the area you want. The first place to look is obviously listed websites, but don't stop there. Use Google maps or walk around town and search for stores that might need your help ... even if they don't know it or yet.

Make a list of all the places. McDonalds, Wendy's, Walmart, Kroger, the little parlor on the corner, the pawn shop, the little mommy and daddy places you've never been to. All places that could accept a minor; Unless you offer something special, you cannot be picky.

Now make sure your resume is above standards. This is a good list to check if you don't have a lot of experience.

Next, you must dress to impress. If you have a suit and tie, you should wear it, but don't worry if you don't. Matching dress pants, dress shoes, a belt, and a matching polo shirt inside should work.

Something like that would be respectable. For God's sake, don't go in a baggy sweatshirt, basketball shorts, and sneakers (or anything like that).

Okay, now you're ready for the part that most people don't do. Now you need to show that you want that job, that you deserve that job, that it is the best that job could find. Go to the venues in person and show that you can go the extra mile.

Have an interview? Introduce yourself before everyone else, even if you are the last person scheduled.

Let them know that you are willing to start the next morning, or even that day if that works. (Be available to)

Go into places that don't have advertisements to ask for help and politely ask if there is anything you can do. Some places may need help, but they haven't posted any ads yet.

“Hello sir / mom. My name is (), I am 17 years old () in (school). I have been looking for work and would greatly appreciate any possible position at this establishment. * Mention possible achievements that show that you are special. High GPA, athletic achievements, previous work experience, examples of hard work. Anything that shows you are hardworking, smart, and eager * I'd be willing to start anytime, even right now, if you wish. I feel like I could do a lot for the company, even things that you may not have realized yet. I will work harder than anyone who has employed here, I am smart, creative and I will make clients leave smiling and eager to come back again and again. I know this can be unexpected but I want to show you that hiring me would be a decision you will never regret. All I'm asking for is an opportunity; I'll even work a few days for free, and if you're not more than satisfied, I'll go. Here is my resume. I'd love to get started as soon as possible, but if you would like to have time to think about it, I fully understand and would be more than willing to speak in any way that suits you at any time. "

I suggest you cold-call and email places too, but at 17, face-to-face would benefit you so much more because you would stand out.

If you keep doing that in dozens of places, unless you have a horrible track record on something, I'd almost guarantee you a deal somewhere. Be courteous, eager, and willing to do anything or accept almost any offer.

Some more tips:

You can't be afraid of hard work to make this work. Be prepared for backbreaking and exhausting work if you have to.

Be polite. Sir, Mom, thank you, you're welcome, doing everything possible to help everyone present. Don't get sarcastic or sarcastic either; Be positive and energetic within reason at all times.

Have good grades, sports achievements, experience working hard. Anything to prove yourself before you get a chance on the field.

Early is punctual. The time is late.

If you are trying to get a house job like shoveling snow, use the speech but replace some parts. Be very insistent on being willing to work for free at first to prove yourself and start small.

Good luck! Work harder than you've ever worked before and feel free to start by clicking the upvote button and move on to see more content that will hopefully help people, especially if this answer helped you.

When you've just finished high school and you mean getting a job at the local grocery store or your Home Depot, it's not too difficult as long as you have a pulse and a working brain.

They just want to know if you are a human being who can do the job, not argue, and be in tune with the culture. In fact, these are the kind of jobs where you can apply online and come straight to the store, do the interview, and often the same day if you are hired, you will either start immediately or take a drug test.

Looking back, I think a year of any kind of retail experience at that age would have

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When you've just finished high school and you mean getting a job at the local grocery store or your Home Depot, it's not too difficult as long as you have a pulse and a working brain.

They just want to know if you are a human being who can do the job, not argue, and be in tune with the culture. In fact, these are the kind of jobs where you can apply online and come straight to the store, do the interview, and often the same day if you are hired, you will either start immediately or take a drug test.

Looking back, I think it would have been nice to have a year of any kind of retail experience at that age, no matter how bad the job might suck. It teaches you basic responsibility and how to work a typical 9-5 schedule. But a boss of mine told me earlier that you don't want to be stuck in that retail world forever, or in low-level IT support jobs.

Now if you want to skip all of that and do something more complicated, you can already start acquiring different skills that would make you employable or that you can use to work on your own side business.

With places like Udemy and Coursera, there are all sorts of different skills that you can start learning about and see if you're passionate about them. From marketing to project management to scheduling, it's good to try a few of these things before deciding to go to college and major in something.

The basic idea from there is to work on your portfolio, post it all on a real website, volunteer, and start landing your own clients, and then use that as the experience you need to be able to get other jobs.

Choose your option. I'd even consider becoming a virtual assistant if you can at your age. Some friends of mine said it's one of those jobs where you can gain some really valuable customer service style skills that will come in handy later for other aspects of your career, and you can even work from home too!

This way, you can start earning a little income as you begin your college career and pursue internships and club activities to further strengthen your budding resume. If that doesn't interest you as much, as others said in the comments, there are other ways to earn money and get a job even with little experience at that age.

Someone was even raised as a pet sitter, and these days, I've also had friends of mine who recommended this site called Rover to me if you wanted to get in. Apparently, it's a nice, relaxing type of job where you can walk dogs, take care of them, and still have time to do other things in your life. Hopefully this will help you!

Well it depends a lot on what you are looking for, any job that is within your area of ​​interest or that brings you some personal benefit is not a particularly bad job, but I don't think there is any (minimum legal) job that is intrinsically " bad":

Sure some would say that working at McDonalds would be a bad idea, but if you want to get better at dealing with people, why not? If you need work experience, there is nothing wrong with working at any job.

Now for jobs that are worse during the summer:

  1. Lifeguard at an open beach or pool. Your skin will beg for mercy and I will not break you
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Well it depends a lot on what you are looking for, any job that is within your area of ​​interest or that brings you some personal benefit is not a particularly bad job, but I don't think there is any (minimum legal) job that is intrinsically " bad":

Sure some would say that working at McDonalds would be a bad idea, but if you want to get better at dealing with people, why not? If you need work experience, there is nothing wrong with working at any job.

Now for jobs that are worse during the summer:

  1. Lifeguard at an open beach or pool. Your skin will beg for mercy and you won't particularly like your tan. Also, there are too many kids and children (troublemakers, who can't stop running) during the summer.
  2. Working, say, in a zoo or any other place that requires being outdoors for long periods of time.
  3. Work in a gift shop or some similar place in a city that attracts tourists. Most of the people who travel abroad choose to do it during the summer, and the language barrier (due to different accents or not knowing the language) could cause a lot of discomfort.
  4. Or work anywhere else that might get too crowded during the summer, making your work hours a bit more stressful. Work in airports, carnivals, amusement parks, ice cream parlors or beaches.

However, in the end I will remind you that the worst job (legal, again) would probably be not having a job.

I suggest jobs where the introvert can be somewhat creative, unlikely to be micromanaged, and learn a valuable skill.

My summer job was at Dunkin 'Donuts, and as a teenager it was a lot of fun. I was able to interact with customers and my supervisor was very relaxed; It was fun making banana split and those toxic blue ice drinks. I forgot what they are called. The pay was fine, but I also received a lot of tips. As for the skills I learned, I guess it was nice learning to talk to people. You realize how derivative "have a nice day" sounds; Be more creative than that!

A second suggestion is volunteering

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I suggest jobs where the introvert can be somewhat creative, unlikely to be micromanaged, and learn a valuable skill.

My summer job was at Dunkin 'Donuts, and as a teenager it was a lot of fun. I was able to interact with customers and my supervisor was very relaxed; It was fun making banana split and those toxic blue ice drinks. I forgot what they are called. The pay was fine, but I also received a lot of tips. As for the skills I learned, I guess it was nice learning to talk to people. You realize how derivative "have a nice day" sounds; Be more creative than that!

A second suggestion is volunteering at a soup kitchen. Help fill in that 'community service' slot when you apply to college. It will force you to leave your introversion behind. After I volunteered at the Holy Apostle Soup Kitchen in Chelsea, I was pretty tired; tired of witnessing too much reality. But also, super nice helping people. Typically, you will help prepare meals, chat with other volunteers, and serve as a waiter.

Introverts tend to seek balance. I don't think it necessarily means finding a job where you don't have to interact with anyone. The loss of being an introvert comes from having to do an act of joy, that is, working in a nightclub, a Walmart checkout. It would be unpleasant to spend your summer vacation mindless. Ciao

The type of job you can get depends largely on your skill set. This is true regardless of your age.

Most people your age get jobs at local businesses or summer camps, although those aren't the only options.

As a high school student, although difficult, you can still get internships that pay well above the minimum wage. The exact salary will depend on your qualifications and the field in which you obtain an internship, but there are many opportunities available. If you are interested in internships in technology, I suggest you find some way to develop contacts and start building your portfolio.

If you are ta

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The type of job you can get depends largely on your skill set. This is true regardless of your age.

Most people your age get jobs at local businesses or summer camps, although those aren't the only options.

As a high school student, although difficult, you can still get internships that pay well above the minimum wage. The exact salary will depend on your qualifications and the field in which you obtain an internship, but there are many opportunities available. If you are interested in internships in technology, I suggest you find some way to develop contacts and start building your portfolio.

If you are talented or knowledgeable about a particular topic, you can become a tutor on that topic. People are always willing to pay well for good tutors, and you can easily take advantage of that.

There are also several different non-traditional possibilities. You could try selling things on Amazon or eBay. You can post how-to videos on places like udemy and charge for them. You can develop mobile apps and get paid to download the app or earn money through ads. The same applies to website development. If you create a really great website or app, maybe you can sell it to another company.

Maybe you are a good writer. Maybe you could self publish a book on kindle. Maybe you are a great artist. You can sell your art or maybe charge people to draw or paint things for them.

There are a number of ways you can earn money and it ultimately depends on your skill set. I hope I have provided you with enough ideas to get started or explore more options.

Yes, I had several summer jobs when I was a teenager.

  • First, I was an unpaid farm hand to my parents.
  • Then I worked for a nearby farmer picking tomatoes for 25 cents a basket.
  • I also worked for another farmer painting and doing odd jobs on his farm.
  • My first non-farm job was two summers on a construction crew building single-family homes.
  • When I was 18 and 19, I had summer jobs at two different factories: one was a dairy processing plant and the other was a medical equipment factory.

I know how hard work and work experience helped set the stage for my successful career. Sorry for the people

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Yes, I had several summer jobs when I was a teenager.

  • First, I was an unpaid farm hand to my parents.
  • Then I worked for a nearby farmer picking tomatoes for 25 cents a basket.
  • I also worked for another farmer painting and doing odd jobs on his farm.
  • My first non-farm job was two summers on a construction crew building single-family homes.
  • When I was 18 and 19, I had summer jobs at two different factories: one was a dairy processing plant and the other was a medical equipment factory.

I know how hard work and work experience helped set the stage for my successful career. Sorry for people who ask questions about getting their first job after graduating from college. It's a shame they missed out on getting real-world work experience (and making a little money) when they were in high school and college.

In the past I have worked for two different companies whose staff was 100% temporary (except the owners). In both cases I was there for about 2 years or so.

Unfortunately, there is NOTHING illegal in practice. It is a business practice that some companies follow. Makes it easy to ditch staff in the blink of an eye if needed. However, it does not necessarily say anything about the stability of the company.

Some temp companies offer benefits as part of the gig, so it's not always a bad thing. But, since you are technically a temp, you CAN get fired

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In the past I have worked for two different companies whose staff was 100% temporary (except the owners). In both cases I was there for about 2 years or so.

Unfortunately, there is NOTHING illegal in practice. It is a business practice that some companies follow. Makes it easy to ditch staff in the blink of an eye if needed. However, it does not necessarily say anything about the stability of the company.

Some temp companies offer benefits as part of the gig, so it's not always a bad thing. But, since you are technically a temp, you CAN be fired without notice. It simply depends on the people who run the company.

In my case, the first company was sold and a third of the workforce was laid off. The irony is that what the people at the buying company didn't know was that their company was going to be sold a week later. I sure would have loved to see the expression of everyone who gloated over us during the first round of layoffs.

The second company went bankrupt due to administration, destroyed the workforce, and was eventually divided as a Thanksgiving Turkey.

For the summer:

  • Day camp counselor, especially for a sports camp
  • 24-40 hours a week at almost any business within walking distance of where you live, as long as you are at least 16 years old.

At any time during the year, umpire (umpire or umpire) youth sports. Flag football, soccer, lacrosse, basketball, ice hockey, baseball, and fastpitch softball.

You can earn up to twice the current minimum hourly wage (or more) as a youth sports officiant.

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