What's the best personal story about meeting Steve Jobs?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Jaylen Harding



What's the best personal story about meeting Steve Jobs?

The time he dismissed the top executives of America's largest wireless firms with disdain.

This was told to me by my mentor at the management consulting firm I worked for in Boston a few years ago (The Cambridge Strategic Management Group, CSMG).

As strategic experts in the field of wireless technology, my company was hired by Apple Inc. to advise them a few months before at the crucial moment when they released the first iPhone in 2007.

The core of our work was analyzing which wireless companies they should partner with. The main targets in America were the two largest wireless c

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The time he dismissed the top executives of America's largest wireless firms with disdain.

This was told to me by my mentor at the management consulting firm I worked for in Boston a few years ago (The Cambridge Strategic Management Group, CSMG).

As strategic experts in the field of wireless technology, my company was hired by Apple Inc. to advise them a few months before at the crucial moment when they released the first iPhone in 2007.

The core of our work was analyzing which wireless companies they should partner with. The main targets in the United States were the two largest wireless carriers that together had between 60% and 65% of the postpaid market share: Verizon and AT&T (first approached Verizon, but did not like Apple terms on demand, so AT&T was ultimately chosen as a partner).

Now I was not part of that project, but my mentor was, and he was leading the team together with a senior partner from the firm. He is currently a senior executive at Apple Inc. in Cupertino.

He was present in the room when Apple was at the negotiating table with the C-level executives of some of the largest wireless firms in the world.

And he tells me that the heads of wireless networks started talking about how they differentiated their networks. That each of their companies was 'special' in one way or another, rather than just 'dumb pipes' (as we called it in the trade) that carried voice and data, similar to what electric, gas or power companies do. public services.

The big dogs of AT&T, Vodafone (which owned Verizon) and Sprint were all sitting in the room when Jobs declared this as a bloody boss (and I'm not quoting him verbatim here, but rather summarizing the gist of what he said in relation to me later by my mentor who was sitting at the table)

"Let's be realistic. Your companies are mere conduits that transmit voice and data.

Enough with this "We are special" talk.

No, you guys HAVE NO IDEA about the type of device we have made here.

It will shock and shake the entire sector as you will not believe. "

And boy was he right!

And no, the wireless executives had yet to see the iPhone at the time.

My mentor later told me that only a man with balls the size of Jobs would have the recklessness to speak so callously to the heads of some of the most powerful corporations on the planet.

Later I would tell my company that I was satisfied enough with the work we did that we should have charged Apple more money. (We were paid just a couple million dollars for our work, which was honestly a dumb change for Jobs and Apple.)

Jobs and other Apple executives were satisfied enough with the work my company had done that several of my former co-workers were hired as Apple Inc. executives in its strategy department.


You know, despite how popular the iPhone is as a device, most people have no idea how it revolutionized power dynamics in the wireless ecosystem, especially in the US.

Until then, it was the wireless network providers (Verizon, AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile) who made the decisions. They could just decide not to offer a certain phone on their network and the device manufacturer was in big trouble. Even giants like Nokia did not dare to take the bad side.

Wireless giants like Verizon and AT&T had a suffocating bottleneck in the wireless apps space, charging consumers exorbitant prices while paying app developers even half the revenue share. Resulting in low supply and demand.

Apple turned that power equation completely upside down in the US market by giving app developers a 'real' 70% share of revenue, thus completely breaking that entire paradigm with the strength of a device. It has to go pound for pound as one of the most disruptive events in terms of power dynamics in the history of not only the world of technology but of any line of business.

If you have a large number of hundreds of thousands of apps today, now you know who to thank for that.

Whether you like or like Jobs as a person, you simply have to be amazed by both the man's influence and his level of confidence.

I imagine the man had his pants tailored to fit balls that size.

It was 2003 and I was trying to start my own independent equity research firm after leaving banking and seeing the need for informed opinions on stocks. I also thought that we were about to experience a massive revolution around digital media, so I focused on companies in that area, one of which was Apple.

Apple decided to hold a financial analyst day in which top executives talk about their business in person with analysts at its headquarters. I emailed his investor relations person and received an invitation.

As the day progressed we had several performances and Steve finally ended up taking the stage to talk about him.

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It was 2003 and I was trying to start my own independent equity research firm after leaving banking and seeing the need for informed opinions on stocks. I also thought that we were about to experience a massive revolution around digital media, so I focused on companies in that area, one of which was Apple.

Apple decided to hold a financial analyst day in which top executives talk about their business in person with analysts at its headquarters. I emailed his investor relations person and received an invitation.

As the day progressed, we had several shows and Steve finally took the stage to talk about the iPod. I don't remember what other analysts asked me, but I did ask what I thought was the obvious question, although it caused a bit of a stir when I asked, "So when do you turn the iPod into a phone or integrate it into one?"

I will never forget this, Steve took a drink from a bottle of water, looked at the ground and proceeded to give an answer that illustrated what a great tactician he was:

"So we would love to make this a phone, but there is a real problem with the wireless industry and that is that operators have too much control over the device.
If we try to turn it into a phone, they will want to control the experience and I think it will destroy what it does. make the iPod unique. If I thought there was an operator that would allow us to create a device that meets our standards, we would do it tomorrow, but I think it will be a long time before that happens. "

(If anyone at Apple (company) has the transcript, please post it as I think it's a historical answer in the Apple arc and I'm probably not doing it justice.)

And the beauty of his answer is that it had nothing to do with technology. It's clear to me that I was aggressively working on a mobile phone version at the time, but the reason I wasn't going to launch one (at the time) was because I didn't have enough bargaining power to deliver a device without having the experience. bastardized by carriers as they used to do at that time.

In fact, what happened is that Steve waited until the race got more heated and ended up making a deal with the # 5? # 6? player on the market - Cingular. Cingular was rapidly losing ground as a wireless service provider was also running and was willing to relinquish control of the phone to throw a Mary hello to win the subscriber addition game. And it worked.

Shortly after closing a deal with Apple to be the first carrier to offer the iPhone, it quickly became one of the leading carriers in terms of new wireless subscriber additions. So much so that AT&T Wireless bought Cingular just to be able to offer the iPhone (!!!). (** Update: There is some controversy over the timing of the deals, so the iPhone's role in the deal is unclear ... good material for a follow-up question. **)

And that's how Steve finally did what no other phone maker could do and broke the monopoly of wireless carriers. And in my opinion, it was a game that he was already playing in 2003 while others debated whether people would pay $ 0.99 for a song that they could get for free.

** Update: Please note how similar your answer to making iPod an iPhone is to your answers on whether Apple will offer a TV - it's about the structure of the industry, not whether something is technically feasible. More companies would do well to follow this line of thinking when deciding to revolutionize an industry.
Top Apple Executives Detail Everything That Sucks About The TV Industry

This story was my first meeting.

As a new Apple employee, after orientation, you get your first and only free lunch with your new manager. So there I am, wearing my shiny new employee badge, queuing to pay, having decided on pizza vs sushi or one of the other delicious options at Caffé Macs. Of course, like n00b, I try to look cool, or at least fit, like I had lunch here every day.

So I'm just looking around nonchalantly, when BOOM, which paces my field of vision (and paces is the word; SJ had a strange, slightly springy gait, even when he was on top of his

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This story was my first meeting.

As a new Apple employee, after orientation, you get your first and only free lunch with your new manager. So there I am, wearing my shiny new employee badge, queuing to pay, having decided on pizza vs sushi or one of the other delicious options at Caffé Macs. Of course, like n00b, I try to look cool, or at least fit, like I had lunch here every day.

So I'm just looking around indifferently, when BOOM, who comes into my field of vision (and walks is the word; SJ had a strange gait, a little springy, even when he was at the peak of health) but STEVE JOBS. MY GOD. KEEP IT UP. It's right there, not 20 feet away!

Wait a second. He is heading towards me. I look back at the cashier to assess the situation. a couple of people in front of me (lunch rush hour); By no means do I pay and climb before he closes that distance. I look back at Steve; IT IS STILL LEADING RIGHT FOR ME. He's looking directly at me!

So now is the time to make a decision. What is the protocol here? Will you want cuts? there are like 6 people behind me. That is the deal? Does SJ get automatic cuts? If so, is it front or back cuts? What if you ask me what to do? Heard he fired a guy for answering that wrong. I don't want to get fired on the first day! Wow, he's like three feet away now and practically looking down at me.

So naturally, I step out of line and head to the frozen treat freezer like I forgot to have an It's It. Which in this case I had forgotten. Anyway. As I lie there, I look back; Steve is now selecting an Odwalla bar or something from the case next to the cash register. Which was where he was headed and what he had been looking at the entire time.

And that was the first time I met Steve at Apple, on my first day. I never knew what the court protocol was.

I have to add mine:

In 1993 I was the NeXT distributor in Mexico. After many struggles I managed to sell a 1 million dollar deal to a bank in Mexico (licenses and consulting).

In terms of business, it was HUGE for me (my first contract of that size), it was a medium-sized deal in the Mexican market, but it was a very important deal for NeXT.

The bank owner demanded that Steve come to Mexico to sign the contract, which seemed like a deal breaker.

Oddly enough, Steve agreed.

HP was the bank's hardware supplier and has just signed an alliance with NeXT to have NeXTStep r

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I have to add mine:

In 1993 I was the NeXT distributor in Mexico. After many struggles I managed to sell a 1 million dollar deal to a bank in Mexico (licenses and consulting).

In terms of business, it was HUGE for me (my first contract of that size), it was a medium-sized deal in the Mexican market, but it was a very important deal for NeXT.

The bank owner demanded that Steve come to Mexico to sign the contract, which seemed like a deal breaker.

Oddly enough, Steve agreed.

HP was the bank's hardware vendor and just signed a partnership with NeXT to make NeXTStep run on their wonderful PA Risc workstations.

Having heard from Steve that he was coming to Mexico (Guadalajara City) to sign the contract, HP organized an event for financial services and got Steve to present a Keynote about the event.

Anyway, NeXT asked me to collaborate with the HP folks in Mexico to have one of those famous Steve presentations at the event and gave me the number of one of HP's vice presidents to make sure everything was okay.

I tried to get in touch with the vice president and he didn't return my calls, but I ended up working with his team on the details of the presentation and organizing the million details that Steve demanded in a hotel and especially in his meals.

I had been to a couple of meetings with Steve and had no hope that he would recognize me in a meeting, nor did the people at NeXT believe it.

So, very politely, they asked me to stand in the lobby of the hotel the moment Steve arrived to "introduce myself again," so we had a five-minute chat about the details of the deal.

What we never expected was that Steve would arrive in the lobby and without hesitation (and being closely followed by the VP of HP) would walk directly up to me and deliver a sentence that would change my life:

"I know that you have helped us here to get this contract and we are here to fulfill it, thank you very much for your help, we will never forget it"

I was 25 at the time and speechless (many people would still doubt that I can be silent for many seconds).

Steve was already my hero, but what really overwhelmed me was that he could recognize me and thank me (he was also known to be a jerk ...)

The HP VP arrived seconds after apologizing for not being able to return my calls and invite me to dinner.

The difference between the two boys was so clear to me, and I hadn't forgotten it since.

It was a very clear lesson and it had nothing to do with technology.

Okay ... I have an encounter story about Steve J. that is SERIOUSLY unique!

In 1982, I hosted a dinner with Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak at one of America's most expensive restaurants: a meticulously posh place in Boston called L'Espalier. The dinner was in conjunction with Applefest '82, sponsored by The Boston Computer Society. Our dinner guests included senior technology reporters from The Wall Street Journal, BusinessWeek, and The NY Times.

As we were finishing dessert, Steve suddenly, without warning, pushed back his chair and stood in the middle of the restaurant. It began to ta

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Okay ... I have an encounter story about Steve J. that is SERIOUSLY unique!

In 1982, I hosted a dinner with Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak at one of America's most expensive restaurants: a meticulously posh place in Boston called L'Espalier. The dinner was in conjunction with Applefest '82, sponsored by The Boston Computer Society. Our dinner guests included senior technology reporters from The Wall Street Journal, BusinessWeek, and The NY Times.

As we were finishing dessert, Steve suddenly, without warning, pushed back his chair and stood in the middle of the restaurant. He started talking loudly to all the customers.

I was mortified. Steve was 27 and looked like a frilly hippie. No one in the restaurant would have any idea who this tough young man was. And Steve just didn't get it - this is a Boston establishment and you DON'T DO things like this in Boston.

The silent conversations in the restaurant stopped abruptly.

Steve was telling everyone about "This Applefest computer program across the street at the Hynes Convention Center."

"And," he said, "... this whole event was organized by THIS GUY, Jonathan!"

My God, I thought, he's humiliating me in front of the Boston elite and the business tech press at the same time.

"And," Steve said next. "Jonathan is only EIGHTEEN YEARS OLD. Jonathan is single and WE NEED TO FIND HIM A GIRLFRIEND!"

The restaurant was silent. And then a moment later, a nicely dressed couple sitting at another table suddenly raises their hands.

"Oh, oh," said the husband. "Our daughter is available!"

The whole restaurant laughed.


Actually, there is even more to this crazy story! Jonathan Rotenberg | Facebook

"Steve Jobs was smarter than his parents."

Perhaps this was the best personal story about meeting Steve Jobs as a child. Let me share the full story.

Steve grew up in the neighborhood where most dads did really cool things like PV, batteries, and radars (this was where he developed an interest in electronics).

One of his early models, Larry Lange, lived seven doors away. Why was it a job model? Well, "he was my model of what an HP engineer was supposed to be: a great amateur radio operator, an electronics expert," Jobs said. And he would bring me things to play with.

TO

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"Steve Jobs was smarter than his parents."

Perhaps this was the best personal story about meeting Steve Jobs as a child. Let me share the full story.

Steve grew up in the neighborhood where most dads did really cool things like PV, batteries, and radars (this was where he developed an interest in electronics).

One of his early models, Larry Lange, lived seven doors away. Why was it a job model? Well, "he was my model of what an HP engineer was supposed to be: a great amateur radio operator, an electronics expert," Jobs said. And he would bring me things to play with.

As we walked to Lange's old house, he grabbed a carbon mic, drum kit, and speaker and put it in the driveway. He had me speak into the carbon mic and it was amplified over the speaker.

His father had taught Jobs that microphones always required an electronic amplifier. "So I ran home and told my dad he was wrong." "No, he needs an amplifier," his father assured him.

When Steve protested otherwise, his father said he was crazy. It can't work. “I kept saying no to my dad, telling him I had to see it, and finally he walked with me and saw it. And he said: Well, I'll be a bat out of hell. "

And that's when Steve realized that his father didn't do everything. And then he began to realize a more puzzling discovery: He was smarter than his parents.

He had always admired his father's competence and intelligence. His father was not an educated man, but he had always thought that his father was very intelligent. He didn't read much, but he could do a lot.

It was a very important moment that stuck in his mind. "When I realized that I was smarter than my parents, I felt tremendous shame for having thought that," Steve said.

This discovery, coupled with the fact that he was adopted, made him feel secluded, separated, and separated from both his family and the world.

Not only did he discover that he was brighter than his parents, but he discovered that they knew this and were willing to adapt their lives to suit a son who was highly intelligent and also willful.

So he grew up not only feeling abandoned once, but also feeling that he was special. In his own mind, that was most important in the formation of his Personality.

They were willing to give in to my needs. And they made me feel special.

Image courtesy: Google Images

"When you get something special in your life, you do whatever it takes to not let that person go."

I hope you liked this personal meeting of Steve Jobs as a child. If not, "I really loved it." And I'm curious if he had any similar personal encounters in his life in the comments below.

Much love for you, support on your journey and respect for your time.

Nitesh Sharma (focused readers

I met Steve Jobs in Rome in the summer of 1985. That was right in the middle of his legendary power struggle with John Skulley that nearly destroyed Apple Corp.

When Steve's stop in Rome was announced on the way to the USSR, news of the upheaval in Cupertino had already reached us at Apple dealerships in Italy. By then there were about twenty of us. We were eager to find out what was really going on at the company's headquarters in the United States. We were particularly concerned about our investments in promoting Macintosh computers and related inventory, which had a marked tendency to become

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I met Steve Jobs in Rome in the summer of 1985. That was right in the middle of his legendary power struggle with John Skulley that nearly destroyed Apple Corp.

When Steve's stop in Rome was announced on the way to the USSR, news of the upheaval in Cupertino had already reached us at Apple dealerships in Italy. By then there were about twenty of us. We were eager to find out what was really going on at the company's headquarters in the United States. We were especially concerned about our investments in promoting Macintosh computers and related inventory, which had a pronounced tendency to become obsolete within weeks. The most concerned of all seemed to be the general Roman dealer, who had just bought for his company the elegant modern four-story palazzina in the posh EUR neighborhood in whose garden we all gathered to greet the young genius.

The day Jobs arrived, we were waiting for him in our best formal clothes, as we thought appropriate to welcome someone who was worth $ 500 million when he was still in his twenties (now that number in this business is practically peanuts, but in 1985 it amounted to something yet).

Finally a dark blue limo arrived and this young man came out dressed in a wrinkled white T-shirt, faded blue jeans, and worn basketball shoes. He walked directly to the dais mounted near the building, where he was joined by the concerned-looking Apple dignitaries. He tapped the microphone and then measured the assembled crowd with a crooked smile. He said a few cursory words about his impending trip to the USSR. Then, after a pause, he made a serious face and addressed the Italian executives.

standing next to him: "Now I have something to ask you," he said solemnly. A dramatic silence followed, everyone waiting for at least a clue as to what was happening in Cupertino. But instead he pointed his thumb at the palazzina and, again with his crooked smile, asked, "How much did you pay for this beauty?" A nervous laugh came from all the attendees, and that was the end of the meeting. He stepped off the stage, chatted with the Apple folks for a few minutes, shook everyone's hands, returned to the limo, and joined his fiancee for a bike ride through Tuscany. I learned this from the biography of Walter Isaacson, as well as from the fact that in the USSR he amused himself by systematically ignoring the advice of people at the embassy about not publicly praising all the time as he did with Leon Trotsky. whom he professed to admire as a fellow revolutionary. Chapeau!

I'd say Derek Sivers, who was invited to the first iTunes meetings. I can't even rewrite it, because Derek wrote it beautifully, funnily, and excitingly (Derek, I hope you don't mind if I copy and paste it here!):

In May 2003, Apple invited me to their headquarters to discuss the possibility of introducing the CD Baby catalog to the iTunes Music Store.
iTunes had just launched two weeks earlier, with only some music from the major labels. Many of us in the music business weren't sure this idea would work. Especially those who had seen companies like eMusic make exactly this same model for years without great success.
I fl

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I'd say Derek Sivers, who was invited to the first iTunes meetings. I can't even rewrite it, because Derek wrote it beautifully, funnily, and excitingly (Derek, I hope you don't mind if I copy and paste it here!):

In May 2003, Apple invited me to their headquarters to discuss the possibility of introducing the CD Baby catalog to the iTunes Music Store.
iTunes had just launched two weeks earlier, with only some music from the major labels. Many of us in the music business weren't sure this idea would work. Especially those who had seen companies like eMusic make exactly this same model for years without great success.
I flew to Cupertino thinking that I would meet with one of their marketing or technology people. When I arrived, I learned that about a hundred people from small record labels and distributors had also been invited.
We all walk into a small presentation room, not sure what to expect.
Then Steve Jobs comes out. Wow! Wow.
I was in totally persuasive presentation mode. Trying to convince all of us to give Apple our entire music catalog. Talking about the success of iTunes so far and all the reasons we should be working with them.
He really emphasized saying, “We want the iTunes Music Store to have every piece of music ever recorded. Even if it's discontinued or it doesn't sell much, we want it all. "
This was huge for me, because until 2003, independent musicians were always denied access to mainstream media. For Apple to sell all music, not just music. artists who had ceded their rights to a corporation, it was amazing!
They then showed the Apple software that we would all have to use to send them each album. It required us to put the audio CD into a Mac CD-Rom drive, write down all the album information, song titles, and bio, then click encode to rip and load when done.
I raised my hand and asked him if it was necessary for us to use his software. They said yes.
I asked again, saying that we had over 100,000 albums, already copied as lossless WAV files, with all the information carefully entered by the artist himself, ready to send to their servers with his exact specifications. They said sorry, you need to use this software, there is no other way.
Yuck. That means we have to take each of those CDs off the shelf again, paste it into a Mac, then cut and paste the title of each song into that Mac software. But so be it. If that's what Apple needs, that's fine.
They said they would be ready for us to start uploading videos in the next few weeks.
I flew home that night, posted the meeting notes on my website, emailed all of my clients to announce the news, and went to sleep.
When I woke up, I received angry emails and voicemails from my contact at Apple.
"What the hell are you doing? That meeting was confidential! Remove those notes from your site immediately! Our legal department is furious!"
Confidentiality was not mentioned at the meeting and no agreement was signed. But I removed my notes from my site right away, to be nice. (You can still see a copy that someone posted here.)
Everything was fine, or so I thought.
Apple emailed us the iTunes Music Store contract. We signed it immediately and returned it the same day.
I started building the system to send everyone's music to iTunes.
I decided that we would have to charge $ 40 for this service, to cover our bandwidth and payroll costs of taking each CD out of the warehouse, entering all the information, digitizing it, loading it, and putting it back in the warehouse.
5,000 musicians signed up in advance, each paying $ 40. That $ 200,000 helped pay for the additional equipment and people needed to make this happen.
Within two weeks, we were contacted by Rhapsody, Yahoo Music, Napster, eMusic, and more, each saying they wanted our full catalog.
Yes! Impressive!
You may not be able to appreciate this now, but the summer of 2003 was the biggest turning point independent music has ever had. Until then, hardly any large company would sell independent music. (That's why I had to start CD Baby, because no one would sell my music.)
If iTunes said they wanted it all, and then their competitors needed to keep up, we were in! Since the summer of 2003, all musicians around the world can sell all their music at almost all online outlets. Do you realize how amazing that is?
But there was a problem.
iTunes was not responding to us.
Yahoo, Rhapsody, Napster, and the rest were up and running. But iTunes was not returning our signed contract.
Was it because I posted my meeting notes?
Had Steve Jobs pissed off?
No one at Apple would say anything. Months had passed.
My musicians were impatient and angry.
I apologized optimistically, but I was also starting to worry.
Then, in October, Steve Jobs delivered a special simultaneous keynote address around the world on iTunes.
People had criticized iTunes for having less music than the competition. They had 300,000 songs, while Rhapsody and Napster had more than 2 million songs. (More than 500,000 of them were from CD Baby).
Four minutes later, he said something that made my pounding heart sink into my burning stomach:
“This number could easily have been much higher, if we wanted to let every song in. But we realize that record companies provide great service. They edit! Did you know that if you and I record a song, for $ 40 we can pay for some of the services to get it on your site, through some intermediaries? Can we be on Rhapsody and all these other guys for $ 40? Well, we don't want to leave those things on our site! So we had to edit it. And these are 400,000 quality songs. "
(Watch the video, here.)
Wow! Wow. Steve Jobs just harshly criticized me!
I'm the only one charging $ 40. That was me he was referring to.
Shit. it's okay. That's that. Steve changed his mind. There are no independents on iTunes. You heard the man.
I hated the position I put this in.
Since I started my company in 1998, I have been offering excellent service. He could make promises and keep them, because he was in full control.
Now, for the first time, I had made a promise for something that was out of my control.
So it was time to do the right thing, no matter how much it hurt.
I decided to refund the $ 40 to everyone, with my sincerest apologies. With 5,000 musicians signed up, that meant he was reimbursing $ 200,000.
Since we couldn't promise anything, I couldn't collect money in good conscience.

  • I removed all mention of iTunes from my site.
  • I eliminated the $ 40 cost to make it free.
  • I changed the language to say that we cannot promise anything.
  • I emailed everyone to let them know what had happened.

I decided to make it a free service from then on.
The next day, we got our signed contract from Apple, along with the charging instructions.
Amazing.
We asked, "Why now?" But got no response.
What. Damn Apple.
We start coding and uploading right away.
I silently added iTunes to the list of companies on our site.

But never again did I promise a client that I could do something beyond my total control.


copied from here: http://sivers.org/itunes

I've been good friends with Steve Wozniak for a long time, so once in 2007 I asked him if I could go with him to an Apple Keynote. I'm not even sure if Woz had really planned to go, but he said yes. We sat in one of the front rows, I remember Al Gore and Robin Williams were right behind us, which I thought was very good.

At the end of the lead note, after John Mayer's performance, the crowd rose and mingled. I told Woz that he should go up and say hi to Jobs. Woz said, “Oh, he seems very busy, all those people are crowding around him. He doesn't have time to talk to me… ”. I said "Aw

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I've been good friends with Steve Wozniak for a long time, so once in 2007 I asked him if I could go with him to an Apple Keynote. I'm not even sure if Woz had really planned to go, but he said yes. We sat in one of the front rows, I remember Al Gore and Robin Williams were right behind us, which I thought was very good.

At the end of the lead note, after John Mayer's performance, the crowd rose and mingled. I told Woz that he should go up and say hi to Jobs. Woz said, “Oh, he seems very busy, all those people are crowding around him. He doesn't have time to talk to me… ”. I said, "Aww come on, just for a second ..." and he said it was fine. We walked up to Jobs, who was actually surrounded by people and "manipulators," and Jobs simply stopped what he was doing, ignoring who he was talking to, and turned to look at Woz immediately. I witnessed the most genuine smiles on their faces when they shook hands. At that time, I took this photo:

Woz and Jobs (Photography)

It was strange, I could see the immediate connection between those two. It wasn't like I was watching two Silicon Valley titans being friendly. It was as if I was seeing two children happy to see each other. As far as I know, it's the last photo of those two looking at each other smiling (but I don't know everything). It was published in two books.

One of our co-workers used to work at Apple's flagship store in Palo Alto. During product launches, I would see Steve Jobs hiding in the bushes. At first, the team was concerned that Steve was spying on them, but in reality, he was observing customer reactions to the products.

You can read the full experience here, pretty cool stuff: Hiding in the Bush with Steve Jobs

http://allenpaltrow.tumblr.com/post/9375814057/my-experience-with-jobs-and-apple

This is one I read recently, a good one with good photos.

Other Guides:


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