What's it like to quit a high paying job and do something you love?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Jionni Fry



What's it like to quit a high paying job and do something you love?

Mixed. I worked as an equity analyst in the investment banking industry from 2005 to 2009, then resigned to start teaching. I love teaching math to school kids so it seemed like an easy decision. Creating a full-time job out of something you love is a double-edged sword.

  1. "I love doing this, so price doesn't matter that much" is a bad business mantra.
  2. Banking is considered a high-risk, high-return job, but it's actually good business to get paid well. I went from that to looking at a door hoping a potential student would come in. My pay cut was something like 90% + for the first 2–
Keep reading

Mixed. I worked as an equity analyst in the investment banking industry from 2005 to 2009, then resigned to start teaching. I love teaching math to school kids so it seemed like an easy decision. Creating a full-time job out of something you love is a double-edged sword.

  1. "I love doing this, so price doesn't matter that much" is a bad business mantra.
  2. Banking is considered a high-risk, high-return job, but it's actually good business to get paid well. I went from that to staring at a door hoping a potential student would enter. My pay cut was something like 90% + for the first 2-3 years.

More than this, there is a very counterintuitive factor. Jumping to do your 'thing' eliminates the possibility of 'jumping later to do your thing' forever. We all often live with hopes and dreams. For many, the thought of going on strike one day is enough to spend 80 hours a week in a bloody mine. Eliminate that possibility and life can suddenly seem bleak.

If it turned out that I was not enthusiastic about teaching or was not good at it, I would have had nowhere to go. On the other hand, I could have easily survived two more cycles on the bench in the hope that one day I would sit on a rooftop and teach math to enthusiastic students for the fun of it.

The positives are substantial too

  1. Very often, I can't wait to go to work. (This is also due to the fact that I have a very active toddler at home, but that's a discussion for another day.) I love this comic so I'm plugging it in here.

2. I think what I am doing is significant. Not for a damn second did I have that feeling on the bench.

3. I can choose my hours. In the first 3 years, this meant working all kinds of odd hours. Now, it means that I have more freedom with my schedule.

4. I have a lot of freedom to choose my job. I can take a 3-day detour to read some interesting ideas instead of working on an inspiration break and churning out nonsense.

If you want to quit your job and do something you love, here is some good advice. Be

Temperamentally solid, impervious to comparisons, passionate about your new gig.

Daren left Google to work at my startup for less than half the pay.

And when I offered to increase it, he said no.

After Google acquired the company he worked for, he became restless. He loved working in a small team. Being part of a company with tens of thousands of employees, even as a senior engineer:

Not that much.

When I raised our Series A, I told our investors that I want to make up for the lower salary that everyone at Qwil accepted by joining by giving them a bonus and raise.

They didn't like the idea.

But he was leaving them no choice.

"Look, if it helps Qwil," Daren said, "I'll stay

Keep reading

Daren left Google to work at my startup for less than half the pay.

And when I offered to increase it, he said no.

After Google acquired the company he worked for, he became restless. He loved working in a small team. Being part of a company with tens of thousands of employees, even as a senior engineer:

Not that much.

When I raised our Series A, I told our investors that I want to make up for the lower salary that everyone at Qwil accepted by joining by giving them a bonus and raise.

They didn't like the idea.

But he was leaving them no choice.

"Look, if it helps Qwil," Daren said, "I'll keep my current salary."

If saying no to the extra money meant that Qwil, as a startup, had a better chance of succeeding, it was for it.

I did not accept your offer.

But if I told you that I was not deeply moved by the gesture ...

I would be lying.

When he first got on board, he said, "Just so you know, I'll probably end up joining a game studio within a year."

"Sure you do," I replied. "I am grateful to have you with us."

That was 3 years ago.

And between you and me, I don't think he's going anywhere, but don't tell him I said so.

Having a powerful mission has that effect on people.

Daren comes to work every day and sees how his code helps freelancers around the world access their earnings before unpredictable pay cycles.

So they can sleep soundly at night and pay their bills on time.

The amount of money you receive each month is one thing.

The amount of satisfaction you get each month is another.

And sharing those values ​​with the people you recruit is the best feeling in the world.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.