What programming languages must I learn to become like Mark Zukerberg, Jack Dorsey, Bill Gates, and other great tech entrepreneurs?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Mason Barnes



What programming languages must I learn to become like Mark Zukerberg, Jack Dorsey, Bill Gates, and other great tech entrepreneurs?

The programming language will not decide what you will one day become (but surely one day you will become a good programmer if you practice constantly), but how much effort you put into learning any programming language and what kind of idea you have to do. Create value for the people around you.

People like Mark, Jack, Bill started with an idea, they surely know how to code, but the idea is the main thing. If you have a great idea that can create value for people, scheduling is just one of the tools to turn that idea into reality, also known as a PRODUCT.

Understanding of human behavior.

I started with Microsoft in 1986. At the time, Microsoft's president and chief operating officer (COO) was a very competent man named Jon Shirley, who had reached a high level at Tandy Corporation. His background there was in sales, marketing, and manufacturing, although, as an MIT graduate, he also had some technical knowledge. But the important point is that, once Microsoft became more than a handful of people, Bill cleverly hired Jon Shirley to help Microsoft mature from a very small company to a reasonably large one.

Even before that, it is well known that Bill brought a friend

Keep reading

I started with Microsoft in 1986. At the time, Microsoft's president and chief operating officer (COO) was a very competent man named Jon Shirley, who had reached a high level at Tandy Corporation. His background there was in sales, marketing, and manufacturing, although, as an MIT graduate, he also had some technical knowledge. But the important point is that, once Microsoft became more than a handful of people, Bill cleverly hired Jon Shirley to help Microsoft mature from a very small company to a reasonably large one.

Even before that, it is well known that Bill brought a friend, Steve Balmer, who had studied Business at Harvard. At the time I joined Microsoft, Balmer was vice president of systems, but he was well known for having worked on the organizational and sales aspects of Microsoft. Tech-savvy SDEs (software development engineers) tended to think of Balmer as a salesman, even though he ran one of the largest product divisions.

Throughout this time, Bill was the president, chief executive officer (CEO), and chief technology officer of Microsoft. His role shifted from writing the code himself to evaluating the technical and marketing issues for every product that walked out the door.

In this position, his deep familiarity with the technical aspect of development was of great help to him; he knew when someone hadn't thought of his proposals. He had a very good sense of what it took to build this or that feature. At the same time, he was generalist enough to think beyond the details of writing code to understand something of the market.

So Bill had some innate business skills, especially when it came to understanding why people would or would not buy software. However, he was smart enough not to attempt to master all the details of day-to-day organization and accounting on his own. He hired experts for that.

His primary role as CEO, as opposed to COO or CFO (CFO, who was Frank Gaudette), was to green-light products and direct the direction of the company. His in-depth knowledge of what it took to develop those products really served him well.

I own a blog called The Apple Bite in which we share a different and simple way to make your dreams come true. Like Apple does. My answer below is basically a "Getting the Crest of Jobs" post. from the blog. This would definitely help you develop your vision and build it. Visit The Apple Bite to learn more.

1. Be very direct.
For Steve Jobs, telling the truth is the first rule. He would always tell the truth, even if he hurt the people around him.

2. The "Cool or Shit" rule.
Anything in the world is cool or shit. It's up to you to deliver cool or shit.
3.

Keep reading

I own a blog called The Apple Bite in which we share a different and simple way to make your dreams come true. Like Apple does. My answer below is basically a "Getting the Crest of Jobs" post. from the blog. This would definitely help you develop your vision and build it. Visit The Apple Bite to learn more.

1. Be very direct.
For Steve Jobs, telling the truth is the first rule. He would always tell the truth, even if he hurt the people around him.

2. The "Cool or Shit" rule.
Anything in the world is cool or shit. It's up to you to deliver cool or shit.
3. Details matter. It is worth the wait to get it right.
Also focus on minute details. It's always worth spending a lot of time getting it right and doing it great.

4. Gain confidence.
Gaining confidence is one of the most important things. Steve Jobs always used to speak with such confidence that what he was speaking always seemed right, even if it was actually wrong. You can even wear a black turtleneck and Levi's 501 jeans every day as a uniform to feel part of the team and gain self-confidence.

5. One person may have the best idea in the world, but if you don't convince other people enough, then it doesn't matter.
Convincing was one of Jobs's powers. He was an expert at that. To achieve this, you will have to read to others like a book and plant an idea in their heads.

6. True artists deliver.
You have to deliver on time as promised to be legendary. Providing excellent and helpful service is essential.

7. Be focused. Stay hungry.
Focus is the main thing to become a legend. It can only be achieved through SACRIFICE.

What does Facebook use

So Facebook is mostly written in PHP. Much of it is written using XHP, and the runtime is HipHop for PHP. Like most websites, there is a lot of JavaScript.

The backend services are written in C, C ++, and Java. Many of the C ++ services are based on Boost. Many of the internal tools are written in Python. One of the services behind Chat, the channel servers, is written in Erlang. The backend services and the web interface communicate using Apache Thrift. The iPhone application and the iOS SDK are written in Objective C.

OCalm, Haskel and Ruby are also used, but as far as I know only internally

Keep reading

What does Facebook use

So Facebook is mostly written in PHP. Much of it is written using XHP, and the runtime is HipHop for PHP. Like most websites, there is a lot of JavaScript.

The backend services are written in C, C ++, and Java. Many of the C ++ services are based on Boost. Many of the internal tools are written in Python. One of the services behind Chat, the channel servers, is written in Erlang. The backend services and the web interface communicate using Apache Thrift. The iPhone application and the iOS SDK are written in Objective C.

OCalm, Haskel and Ruby are also used, but as far as I know only internally.

What Mark Knows

According to his TopCoder profile (mzuckerberg | TopCoder profile), he is a third-level C ++ programmer.

There is also an interesting source (FOUND: Mark Zuckerberg's Hacker-For-Hire Profile From 2002) where he claims to know: Visual Basic, VBscript, C, C ++, Java, Javascript and ASP.

Since Facebook is mainly written in PHP, we can also assume that you definitely learned it by developing it.

Yes or no?

So the final answer is no. You didn't know most of the languages ​​used in FB and you probably don't know them yet. As I mentioned before, you may not even know PHP that well.

Hope my answer covers everything you need :)

Thanks for the A2A.

Both Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg are successful entrepreneurs, so you will surely need to learn a lot more than coding. However, they build your business over a long period, so you don't have to learn it all at once.

A very quick answer to your question is: you will have to learn:

  1. Code to get started so you can understand what software development is all about.
  2. Understand what technology can do. What problems can it solve.
  3. Cultivate a vision from which you can build your business.
  4. Business skills so you can make your vision profitable.
  5. Leadership skills
Keep reading

Thanks for the A2A.

Both Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg are successful entrepreneurs, so you will surely need to learn a lot more than coding. However, they build your business over a long period, so you don't have to learn it all at once.

A very quick answer to your question is: you will have to learn:

  1. Code to get started so you can understand what software development is all about.
  2. Understand what technology can do. What problems can it solve.
  3. Cultivate a vision from which you can build your business.
  4. Business skills so you can make your vision profitable.
  5. Leadership skills so you can execute your vision with a team.

I urge you to read more about Gates and Zuckerberg. I'm sure you will find books that talk about their early years, what they learned, what they did, what contributed to their success, etc. That way you can have a clearer idea of ​​the path their careers took and what they had to learn along the way. Much of the information you seek may not be explicitly specified, but it will be implicit in the challenges they faced and how they overcame them.

It was, although I don't know if it still is. I was his boss at Odeo and he effortlessly moved from C to Rails and then Javascript. The quality of your code was excellent. And overall, he was very good at figuring out what was wrong with someone else's code.

On that team, he was generally the most pragmatic, and as a result, he dispatched many functions. He was less likely to advocate for best practices, but he had no problem following them.

We had a legacy code written by one of the founders that was a total hairball. Jack was the only one on that team who was willing to fix it when it broke.

We were one of

Keep reading

It was, although I don't know if it still is. I was his boss at Odeo and he effortlessly moved from C to Rails and then Javascript. The quality of your code was excellent. And overall, he was very good at figuring out what was wrong with someone else's code.

On that team, he was generally the most pragmatic, and as a result, he dispatched many functions. He was less likely to advocate for best practices, but he had no problem following them.

We had a legacy code written by one of the founders that was a total hairball. Jack was the only one on that team who was willing to fix it when it broke.

We were one of the first users of Rails and AJAX (that is, the early days of Javascript interfaces in web applications). And he figured out all of those things easily and posted a lot of the code in front of Odeo.

Then when we wanted to test his idea of ​​what became of Twitter, he wrote most of the code for the first version and also did most of the product design.

I think it's pretty safe to assume that the last time Jack Dorsey did some serious coding, he was working on the Twitter Ruby on Rails application which became known as "The Monorail", a gigantic, monolithic rails application that used to run the entire infrastructure of Twitter It was only dismantled last year.

Jack was an active contributor until 2008. He has almost 2000 commits in the appropriately named twitter repository, which was originally an svn repository but later converted to git. Fortunately, all of svn's commit history survived.

Looking at your commit history, almost every file that you changed w

Keep reading

I think it's pretty safe to assume that the last time Jack Dorsey did some serious coding, he was working on the Twitter Ruby on Rails application which became known as "The Monorail", a gigantic, monolithic rails application that used to run the entire infrastructure of Twitter It was only dismantled last year.

Jack was an active contributor until 2008. He has almost 2000 commits in the appropriately named twitter repository, which was originally an svn repository but later converted to git. Fortunately, all of svn's commit history survived.

Looking at your commit history, almost all the files you changed were ruby, html, js, or css, not counting images and configuration files. However, I see some swf (flash) files there.

I'm sure Jack has programmed in many other languages, but his strength is web development, particularly in Rails.

According to the book I'm Feeling Lucky: The Confessions of Google Employee Number 59, Page and Brin actually had little to do with creating the code that powered Google back then.

Google's chief engineering officer, Craig Silverstein, says: "I didn't trust Larry and Sergey as programmers. I had to deal with their legacy code from the Stanford days and had a lot of problems. They are research coders - more interested in writing. code that works than code that can be maintained ".

None of Larry's original codes are in the current code base. But obviously there would be no Google without its original, poorly optimized

Keep reading

According to the book I'm Feeling Lucky: The Confessions of Google Employee Number 59, Page and Brin actually had little to do with creating the code that powered Google back then.

Google's chief engineering officer, Craig Silverstein, says: "I didn't trust Larry and Sergey as programmers. I had to deal with their legacy code from the Stanford days and had a lot of problems. They are research coders - more interested in writing. code that works than code that can be maintained ".

None of Larry's original codes are in the current code base. But obviously there would be no Google without its original code, poorly optimized and "lousy": P

Turns out, Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergy Brin are actually pretty lousy coders.

Both Gates and Zuckerberg were early coders. Bill Gates was proficient in BASIC and assembly (the most popular languages ​​in those days). Zuckerberg was proficient in php, c ++ (I don't mention HTML and CSS as programming languages), etc. But when Zuck was in college, he used to hack into university systems to steal information (mostly photos), this reveals that he had a good command of a language like Python or Bash. To find out more about the life of Zuckerberg's coding, you should watch the movie "The Social Network." To develop a website like facebook, the first thing that matters is an idea, if you have

Keep reading

Both Gates and Zuckerberg were early coders. Bill Gates was proficient in BASIC and assembly (the most popular languages ​​in those days). Zuckerberg was proficient in php, c ++ (I don't mention HTML and CSS as programming languages), etc. But when Zuck was in college, he used to hack into university systems to steal information (mostly photos), this reveals that he had a good command of a language like Python or Bash. To find out more about the life of Zuckerberg's coding, you should watch the movie "The Social Network." To develop a website like Facebook, the first thing that matters is an idea, if you have an idea, you will also need one of the following to implement the idea:

  1. PHP and PHPMyAdmin
  2. Ruby on Rails
  3. Django (python)

While HTML, CSS, and JavaScript are basic markup languages, they are a must.

It is very simple: nobody becomes a GOOD PROGRAMMER without WRITING PROGRAMS that interest him.

Writing code for money works.

Writing code for a class grade COULD work.

Writing code for the love of programming and the desire to benefit from the RESULT will almost always work if one just FINISHES, not necessarily perfecting, but finishes something useful.

I program (production programs) in dozens of languages ​​but have never reached the level where I can say "I program in X" without having something WRITTEN in X.

There are specific things you can learn to write BEST programs in any language:

Keep reading

It is very simple: nobody becomes a GOOD PROGRAMMER without WRITING PROGRAMS that interest him.

Writing code for money works.

Writing code for a class grade COULD work.

Writing code for the love of programming and the desire to benefit from the RESULT will almost always work if one just FINISHES, not necessarily perfecting, but finishes something useful.

I program (production programs) in dozens of languages ​​but have never reached the level where I can say "I program in X" without having something WRITTEN in X.

There are specific things you can learn to write BEST programs in any language; check out Software Tools in Pascal by Kernighan and Plauger (when you understand why you are reading an old book in an outdated language, you will be a better programmer).

Based on what appears to be his TopCoder profile (mzuckerberg profile | TopCoder), he is a third-level C ++ programmer.

I also found an interesting source FOUND: Mark Zuckerberg's Hacker-For-Hire Profile From 2002 where apparently his areas of expertise were listed in his RentACoder profile as "Visual Basic, VBscript, C, C ++, Java, Javascript and ASP".

Presumably you also know PHP / Hack from working on Facebook.

However, I didn't find any mention of him knowing Python.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.