What programming language should I learn after working with PL1 for 5 years? My job doesn't pay that well and I would like to have a good income. What language will support my existing professional experience that I already have and benefit me to earn more?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Tia Baker



What programming language should I learn after working with PL1 for 5 years? My job doesn't pay that well and I would like to have a good income. What language will support my existing professional experience that I already have and benefit me to earn more?

You have the fundamentals of programming,

To move fast, it would be better to start with database development (SQL) as it looks like PL1. You can then search for different jobs and then move on to the most wanted ones. But after learning SQL, I would advise you to study javascript until you are really good at it. You can finish these two in three months if you spend 30 minutes to 1 hour every day. Your experience will help you a lot because you know how a computer works from the hardware. You have a huge advantage over non-technical people.

You have what it takes to switch to a new role in 6 months

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You have the fundamentals of programming,

To move fast, it would be better to start with database development (SQL) as it looks like PL1. You can then search for different jobs and then move on to the most wanted ones. But after learning SQL, I would advise you to study javascript until you are really good at it. You can finish these two in three months if you spend 30 minutes to 1 hour every day. Your experience will help you a lot because you know how a computer works from the hardware. You have a huge advantage over non-technical people.

You have what it takes to switch to a new role in 6 months if you put in an hour a day or at least 5 hours a week.

If you need a personal guide, you can send me a personal message and I will be happy to help you with some resources and guidance.

happy coding ...

If you want to increase your income and make a career in the software industry, then it really depends on your end goal.

If you plan to do the work in your area, I would tell you to first look for the software jobs in your area that are most in demand.

Because technologies vary according to different areas. Some companies embrace the latest technologies, but others stick with the old ones.

Today JavaScript is the most demanded language for web applications. For the enterprise level, Java is the leader, and Golang, which is my favorite, is used for cloud and backend servers.

Search for your desired technology

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If you want to increase your income and make a career in the software industry, then it really depends on your end goal.

If you plan to do the work in your area, I would tell you to first look for the software jobs in your area that are most in demand.

Because technologies vary according to different areas. Some companies embrace the latest technologies, but others stick with the old ones.

Today JavaScript is the most demanded language for web applications. For the enterprise level, Java is the leader, and Golang, which is my favorite, is used for cloud and backend servers.

Search for the technology you want and see what languages ​​are required for the selected technology. Because languages ​​are just tools.

You have to know what technology you are interested in and find that path.

Do this:

  1. Get on a job search site, like Indeed
  2. Find a software engineering job in the area you want to live in and for the salary you want to earn
  3. Create a list of the programming languages ​​/ frameworks that demand
  4. Start studying the one that demands the most

But what you probably need more than any specific language is knowledge of different paradigms.

PL1 is procedural. Most of today's applications and systems are object-oriented or functional. You will need to know at least some of both or a lot of one to get a job in today's market.

So, find the most requested language in the area / pay you want and learn

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Do this:

  1. Get on a job search site, like Indeed
  2. Find a software engineering job in the area you want to live in and for the salary you want to earn
  3. Create a list of the programming languages ​​/ frameworks that demand
  4. Start studying the one that demands the most

But what you probably need more than any specific language is knowledge of different paradigms.

PL1 is procedural. Most of today's applications and systems are object-oriented or functional. You will need to know at least some of both or a lot of one to get a job in today's market.

So, find the most requested language in the area / pay you want and learn it, but also learn the underlying paradigms.

Good luck!

When working as a freelancer, there is no such thing as the best programming language to earn the most money. Some industries and types of programming can make more money than others, but it is not tied to a specific language. Something that a lot of people don't realize is that clients don't care what programming language you use as long as what you build meets their goals, is high-quality, and is bug-free. As long as you can consistently meet those three criteria and move towards bigger projects. You will earn more and more no matter what language you use.

The only time language matters is when

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When working as a freelancer, there is no such thing as the best programming language to earn the most money. Some industries and types of programming can make more money than others, but it is not tied to a specific language. Something that a lot of people don't realize is that clients don't care what programming language you use as long as what you build meets their goals, is high-quality, and is bug-free. As long as you can consistently meet those three criteria and move towards bigger projects. You will earn more and more no matter what language you use.

The only time language matters is when you, the customer, have a website or app that they need you to work on. In my experience, these types of projects also tend to be the lowest paying anyway, as they generally don't need as much work once the app or website is created. Apps and websites that need a lot of maintenance work tend to have internal teams or stay with the original people who created them.

Even if a customer specifies that they want a specific language, if you have quality work, you can show it off and be good at sales, you can focus on selling them a solution to their problems rather than an app or website made with a specific language or technology. . .

I once sold a $ 20,000 custom website using the Laravel framework to a customer who was receiving $ 2000- $ 3000 WordPress websites from other freelancers, because the customer asked for a WordPress site. How did i do this? I had the knowledge to recognize what the client really needed and I sold him a site that was designed to meet his goals, increase productivity and therefore increase profits by focusing on the problems he had and the perfect solution. All the other developers were trying to teach the client how to use WordPress or figure out how to customize WordPress for their very specific workflow that was nothing like what WordPress was designed for.

So what can you do if you want to earn more as a developer? You can choose to work on iOS and Android mobile apps as they tend to pay more than websites or desktop apps. At the same time, although mobile apps will also have a higher learning curve, they will take longer to manufacture and will be more difficult to sell to customers.

In the end, it is better to do the following:

  1. Learn the programming language, frameworks, and technologies that you find interesting and easy to use.
  2. Make sure you like what you are doing so that you are passionate enough to keep learning and improving your skills.
  3. Constantly create good websites and applications for both clients and your own projects to build your portfolio.

I'll assume "beginner", since you haven't written anything yet. There are two approaches, choose an advanced language like Java, C, Python, etc. and try to learn it by learning simple concepts and building on those who learn more advanced concepts, OR the other approach is to start with a "learning language", something like Scratch.

I suggest the latter. Play with him for a week. Create simple things and then add more complex tasks to your schedule. Learn what things do in the language. Learn how to assemble pieces of code to work together to accomplish the task that you have decided your program works for.

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I'll assume "beginner", since you haven't written anything yet. There are two approaches, choose an advanced language like Java, C, Python, etc. and try to learn it by learning simple concepts and building on those who learn more advanced concepts, OR the other approach is to start with a "learning language", something like Scratch.

I suggest the latter. Play with him for a week. Create simple things and then add more complex tasks to your schedule. Learn what things do in the language. Learn how to assemble pieces of code to work together to accomplish the task you have decided your program was going to do. Also, in that week learn to “debug” your program when it doesn't behave the way you want it to. This will be an essential and invaluable skill for every program you write because at first or even worse long after, it could fail.

Once you feel competent enough to move from the visual approach and want to write in a language that is used for professional applications and that software design or even coding is something that interests you, go to the first option to learn how. I described it in the first paragraph. Use an industry-grade language and start with small coding solutions, building from there by adding new and more powerful concepts.

In the beginning, you will naturally write procedurally oriented code. You will tend to think primarily in terms of what you want to do. You can write procedural code in any language, in fact, this is how the first programs were written, as procedural code. The code was written and executed so that the tasks in question were the focal point.

With more advanced languages ​​(even in Scratch), you can think of your programs in a different way, in a way that does not follow the process, but in a way that "models" the elements within the set of problems that you are trying to solve. . write a code solution for. This is called "object" programming.

Think of it this way, in procedural programming, it is the procedure or ACTION, the main essential objective of the design. Take the actions. What action happens next? Etc. Meanwhile, in object programming, it is the objects that are relevant to your problem. What objects are involved in the problem you want to solve? What can each object do? How do objects interact with each other? etc.

If you take a step back, you will notice that just like this sentence and the other sentences I have written, there is a noun (object) and a verb (action) in each. Therefore, object programming is like thinking of nouns and verbs when constructing a sentence. Object programming, then, is just like talking! And we all know how to do it, right?

Object programming is a bit more difficult to grasp in concept, but it really shouldn't be that way because we all deal with objects and actions every day. When we choose a new technological device that we have never used before, what do we do? We see a button or lever (noun / object), and we wonder, what can it do (verb / action)?

So in short, procedural programming is defining all the actions that need to occur, and you start writing sequential code that progresses through performing the actions. Object programming provides models (code) for each object that you are trying to model and provides the actions (what each object can do). As an example, you might have code that models a player in a game, with the player being the object / noun. Then define what the player is capable of doing or the forms of behavior (actions). It's actually quite a fun way to think about programming.

I could go deeper here, but I think I picked a good stopping point that keeps it simple, but provides an overview of the "beginning", which was your initial question.

He did not explain why he asks.

(1) You might be asking why you want to choose a language in which you can hire programmers cheaply. The survey referenced by the answer User-11877441336725398727 suggests that you should choose to compile your application in PERL or Visual Basic. Choosing a development pile and then hiring developers is like buying a bunch of paint and brushes and then hiring an artist, or buying a bunch of grapes and hiring a vintner. Like the artist, any developer you hire is likely to say that the language chosen by a non-developer is a poor choice for a

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He did not explain why he asks.

(1) You might be asking why you want to choose a language in which you can hire programmers cheaply. The survey referenced by the answer User-11877441336725398727 suggests that you should choose to compile your application in PERL or Visual Basic. Choosing a development pile and then hiring developers is like buying a bunch of paint and brushes and then hiring an artist, or buying a bunch of grapes and hiring a vintner. Like the artist, any developer you hire is likely to say that the language chosen by a non-developer is a poor choice for the particular application you want to build. Few people would choose to create a mobile application, for example, in PERL or Visual Basic.

(2) You might be asking why you want to be a developer and want to learn the most valuable language. This is like the prospective artist who wants to know the most valuable type of brush or the winemaker who wants to know the most valuable wine to make. My advice is to learn to be a great developer, artist or winegrower and then use the right language, tool or grape for each project.

But you have to start with something, right? You cannot learn a language in the abstract. You can only learn by using it. Start by creating a small instance of the types of applications that you are most interested in working with. For a web application, Javascript is essential for the frontend and Javascript, Python, Ruby, and Java are good options for the backend. For native mobile apps, C-style languages ​​are essential (so start with Java, Objective C, C #).

(3) You might be asking why you are interested in useless statistics. The highest paid programmers are the ones who write great code in whatever language they are writing for companies that have a lot of money to pay programmers, and these surveys never cover that.

The correct answer is Microsoft Excel.

In the past, my PhD advisor taught an introductory computer science class based on football (American) analysis. Much interest from the students, many people showed up who otherwise would not have taken a programming course.

He chose python as his language. It was a disaster.

People who recommend Python or C # or Haskell (!) Haven't had to sit down and teach an introduction to programming class before. I've done this. Repeatedly. There are also many people who are much smarter than me. For kids, best practices are now something like Scratch: Imagine, Program

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The correct answer is Microsoft Excel.

In the past, my PhD advisor taught an introductory computer science class based on football (American) analysis. Much interest from the students, many people showed up who otherwise would not have taken a programming course.

He chose python as his language. It was a disaster.

People who recommend Python or C # or Haskell (!) Haven't had to sit down and teach an introduction to programming class before. I've done this. Repeatedly. There are also many people who are much smarter than me. For kids, best practices are now something like Scratch: Imagine, Program, Share.

Why does this work so well? You make a change, press "go" (or equivalent) and see the results immediately on your screen. That's a nice, tight shift, effect, and feedback loop that encourages more experimentation. There are no syntax errors. There are no problems with installing interpreters or compilers. You don't have to waste time learning a text editor. It's just drag, drop, go, repeat.

Telling adults to start Scratch is problematic; Okay, let's use the correct term: it seems condescending. However, learning how to write macros in Excel gives you all the advantages of Scratch (except drag and drop, and there's even a bit of that if you squint) with a much more powerful language. There is a lot of documentation available that is designed to be really useful for beginners.

Will computer science people go crazy and claim that this is not real programming? Sure. But that's how I learned (going back to VisiCalc and Lotus 1–2–3). Overcoming the limitations of spreadsheets was a great motivator to keep learning more traditional languages, and when I did, I had a little more confidence in myself. (Hey, I might not know C, but I know how to write auto-modifying macros in Excel - I know I'm not an idiot.)

So start with Excel. You will have less frustration, what you learn will likely apply to the things that matter to you, and will be a great foundation for the future.

That depends entirely on the job. Depending on the career you want to pursue and the part of the world you want to communicate with, several different languages ​​can be very helpful. If you are in the United States, the first language to consider is Spanish. This not only allows you to communicate with the millions of Spanish speakers living in the US, but you will also be able to do business with most of Latin America and also with Spain.

If you are interested in doing business with Europeans, French or German may be more helpful. Even the Dutchman has appeared in some job offers.

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That depends entirely on the job. Depending on the career you want to pursue and the part of the world you want to communicate with, several different languages ​​can be very helpful. If you are in the United States, the first language to consider is Spanish. This not only allows you to communicate with the millions of Spanish speakers living in the US, but you will also be able to do business with most of Latin America and also with Spain.

If you are interested in doing business with Europeans, French or German may be more helpful. Even Dutch has appeared on some job postings that I have seen. Spanish is also important in Europe, but not to the same extent as French and German.

If you are interested in emerging markets in Africa, you should consider Arabic or French, or even Swahili, depending on the parts of Africa that interest you. Much of Arabic-speaking Africa also speaks French, so French is probably much more useful in general.

If you are looking at Asia, Mandarin, Japanese, and Korean are good languages ​​to learn. However, they are less present on a global scale, so keep that in mind.

Another interesting option is Portuguese, with many speakers in South America, some in Europe, and many even in Africa.

You really should pick whichever of these languages ​​you find the most interesting. Whose culture do you find the most interesting? Look at all the cultures present within that language community, not just the main one, and see if any of them pique your interest.

In this article we are going to discuss the top 5 programming languages ​​to learn in 2019 to get a job at Google, Facebook, Microsoft, etc. So a question arises: does it matter what language I should learn?

Yes, it does matter, but indirectly. When you apply for software engineer jobs in big companies like Google, Facebook, Microsoft, etc. regardless of the technology you use. They will only check three conditions:

Coding skills

problem solving skills

Data structures and knowledge of algorithms.

So we are going to list the top 5 programming languages ​​to learn in 2019. I had created this list in the base

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In this article we are going to discuss the top 5 programming languages ​​to learn in 2019 to get a job at Google, Facebook, Microsoft, etc. So a question arises: does it matter what language I should learn?

Yes, it does matter, but indirectly. When you apply for software engineer jobs in big companies like Google, Facebook, Microsoft, etc. regardless of the technology you use. They will only check three conditions:

Coding skills

problem solving skills

Data structures and knowledge of algorithms.

So Let List Down the Top 5 Programming Languages ​​to Learn in 2019. I had created this list based on three factors:

Work market

ease of learning

popularity.

So here is the list. In number 5 we have

5. Go Lang

This language was released in 2012 by Google engineers. Now it is rapidly gaining popularity. It is included in the list of the 5 most paid programming languages. If your app struggles with performance and readability, Go is a way to go (no pun intended). For beginners, this can be a bit difficult to learn because Go relies heavily on tips that may not be easy to understand as a new programmer.

it's a good time to learn to go,

4. Fast

swift has now become the main language for creating ios.it applications - & nbspapps Resources and information. - Resources and information from & nbspapps. It is also one of the highest paid programming languages ​​that many companies demand fast developers today. Swift is simple and easy to learn, but it is not cross platform, which means that you cannot build ios applications if you don't have a Mac device.

3. Java

Java is one of the most widely used programming languages. Today it is the main language to make http: // Languages ​​Android. It is a complex language and not easy to learn. Many companies are using Java to develop their programs.

Fun fact: the creator of Java works at Amazon as an engineer.

But a new Kotlin language developed by jet brains is gaining more popularity, which is why many platforms are moving from Java to Kotlin.

Companies that use Java: Slack, Uber, Lyft, Airbnb, etc.

2. Python

It is one of the most popular programming languages. Most companies use Python to develop their software. NASA also uses Python to develop its software. Python can be used in web development, different frameworks like Django and flask are also used to create websites. And if you're interested in data science, machine learning, artificial languages, and deep learning, go blindly for Python. Python is the easiest language to learn, its syntax is very simple.

Fun fact: the creator of Python now works at Dropbox as an engineer.

Companies that use Python: Google, Dropbox, Coursera, Airbnb, etc.

1. Javascript

javascript is a great language to learn. It only runs in the Chrome, Firefox, Safari or Explorer web browser. It is developing as fast as the javascript I had seen a few years ago and has completely changed compared to Home - Home - Now. It is used to develop desktop applications and web applications. There are different frameworks like react, native, angular used in javascript.

Companies that use javascript: Reddit, ebay, instagram, Airbnb, etc.

A tip from me:

If you are new to the world of programming, I would recommend that you choose javascript or python, but it really depends on your preferences, as if you are interested in UI design, then javascript is the best option. data science, then opt for Python.

If you liked this post, I would be very grateful if you would help spread it by emailing a friend or sharing it on Twitter or Facebook and don't forget to leave a comment because your comments are greatly appreciated and help us improve. Thanks!

"CGI" is a popular acronym for two extremely different things: computer-generated imagery and the common gateway interface. Given the wording, I assume you mean the latter.

The answer is that any language that has access to process environment variables and can read from an input stream and write to an output stream can process CGI requests, from C ++ to AWK to Unix shells. Historically, PERL is a very common language for CGI, on the 'LAMP stack', although more recently (though not yet recently: 2005-ish) Python has replaced it in that acronym.

The CGI interface offers

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"CGI" is a popular acronym for two extremely different things: computer-generated imagery and the common gateway interface. Given the wording, I assume you mean the latter.

The answer is that any language that has access to process environment variables and can read from an input stream and write to an output stream can process CGI requests, from C ++ to AWK to Unix shells. Historically, PERL is a very common language for CGI, on the 'LAMP stack', although more recently (though not yet recently: 2005-ish) Python has replaced it in that acronym.

The CGI interface delivers the headers of a request in environment variables, and the POST body is read from the standard input stream. The result is then sent to the standard output stream. So any language that has a command line interface (like Python) or generates executables that run on a command line (like C) can be used to develop them.

(Direct CGIs are becoming rare as they are not very efficient in the long run. Each web request will result in a new shell process on the server. There are several mechanisms called 'fast CGIs' that maintain a single process and do multiple posts to it. But they have to be integrated with the web server. If you are going to put modules on the web server anyway, and especially if you choose a medium-weight language, like Python, instead of writing in PERL or BASH, then you could also adopt one of the lightweight frameworks written for it, like Bottle or Tornado, which will do more of that integration work for you).

Your question is so wrong in many ways.

First, you are focusing on money, programming does not make you money. PRODUCTS make you money. If you want to make money programming, there is only one way: learn how to create great products. If you have no idea how to create great products, learning to code is useless.

Okay, let's say you know how to create great products, and you know what you want to create. Learning for yourself is doable. There are many tutorials online. But again, you are focusing on the EASIER language to learn, not the RIGHT one.

Programming languages ​​are tools and, as such,

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Your question is so wrong in many ways.

First, you are focusing on money, programming does not make you money. PRODUCTS make you money. If you want to make money programming, there is only one way: learn how to create great products. If you have no idea how to create great products, learning to code is useless.

Okay, let's say you know how to create great products, and you know what you want to create. Learning for yourself is doable. There are many tutorials online. But again, you are focusing on the EASIER language to learn, not the RIGHT one.

Programming languages ​​are tools, and as such some are better for certain things and not so good for others. If you focus on the "easiest" without thinking about the best tool to build the product you want to build, it's like learning how to use a screwdriver to drive nails into the wall.

Also, there is no such thing as an "easier" language. Some people find some languages ​​easier than others. There is no standard.

Sorry boy, you need to better set your expectations ...

My first question to you, what do you mean by a better job?

According to my observation, every job is better, it is up to you which field you love. What your heart says is the best work.

For the programming language, it depends on the job.

For instance.

  1. Artificial intelligence: Python, R
  2. Web development: HTML, CSS, JS.
  3. Game development: Unity, C #
  4. IOS development: Swift
  5. Integrated system: C, C ++, Python.

Instead of focusing on multiple languages. Start learning and doing projects that interest you.

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