What programming language do I have to know if I want to start programming in the domain of nanotechnology?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Samantha Powers



What programming language do I have to know if I want to start programming in the domain of nanotechnology?

That is a pretty broad question.

Most of the work in nanotechnology has to do with the manufacture of materials, devices, etc. at the nanoscale, such as biosensors. If you want to work in materials technology, you are probably talking about various modeling and simulation software packages (for example, for 3D atomic modeling). And then there is the scheduling of manufacturing equipment.

Or ... if you want to analyze data coming from sensors at the nanoscale, the assembly code can be useful to handle specialized interfaces for the sensors, and after that, you're talking about data collection and analysis, which involves all kinds of l

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That is a pretty broad question.

Most of the work in nanotechnology has to do with the manufacture of materials, devices, etc. at the nanoscale, such as biosensors. If you want to work in materials technology, you are probably talking about various modeling and simulation software packages (for example, for 3D atomic modeling). And then there is the scheduling of manufacturing equipment.

Or ... if you want to analyze data coming from sensors at the nanoscale, the assembly code can be useful to handle specialized interfaces for the sensors, and after that, you are talking about data collection and analysis, which involves all kinds of languages, somewhat dependent on the types of data being analyzed.

Now if you want to work with very small devices that can actually do some computing, look at who's doing what with "smart dust", but we're not talking nanoscale anymore, we're talking microscale.

Mounting? Nanorobots are too small to run anything you consider a language. At some point it is more like programming with electronic circuits than with a language. In any case, it would be nice to learn some electronics. Although plain C can be seen as assembly if you know the underlying transformations performed by compilers.

The correct answer is Microsoft Excel.

In the past, my PhD advisor taught an introductory computer science class based on football (American) analysis. Much interest from the students, many people showed up who otherwise would not have taken a programming course.

He chose python as his language. It was a disaster.

People who recommend Python or C # or Haskell (!) Haven't had to sit down and teach an introduction to programming class before. I've done this. Repeatedly. There are also many people who are much smarter than me. For kids, best practices are now something like Scratch: Imagine, Program

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The correct answer is Microsoft Excel.

In the past, my PhD advisor taught an introductory computer science class based on football (American) analysis. Much interest from the students, many people showed up who otherwise would not have taken a programming course.

He chose python as his language. It was a disaster.

People who recommend Python or C # or Haskell (!) Haven't had to sit down and teach an introduction to programming class before. I've done this. Repeatedly. There are also many people who are much smarter than me. For kids, best practices are now something like Scratch: Imagine, Program, Share.

Why does this work so well? You make a change, press "go" (or equivalent) and see the results immediately on your screen. That's a nice, tight shift, effect, and feedback loop that encourages more experimentation. There are no syntax errors. There are no problems with installing interpreters or compilers. You don't have to waste time learning a text editor. It's just drag, drop, go, repeat.

Telling adults to start Scratch is problematic; Okay, let's use the correct term: it seems condescending. However, learning how to write macros in Excel gives you all the advantages of Scratch (except drag and drop, and there's even a bit of that if you squint) with a much more powerful language. There is a lot of documentation available that is designed to be really useful for beginners.

Will computer science people go crazy and claim that this is not real programming? Sure. But that's how I learned (going back to VisiCalc and Lotus 1–2–3). Overcoming the limitations of spreadsheets was a great motivator to keep learning more traditional languages, and when I did, I had a little more confidence in myself. (Hey, I might not know C, but I know how to write auto-modifying macros in Excel - I know I'm not an idiot.)

So start with Excel. You will have less frustration, what you learn will likely apply to the things that matter to you, and will be a great foundation for the future.

I'll assume "beginner", since you haven't written anything yet. There are two approaches, choose an advanced language like Java, C, Python, etc. and try to learn it by learning simple concepts and building on those who learn more advanced concepts, OR the other approach is to start with a "learning language", something like Scratch.

I suggest the latter. Play with him for a week. Create simple things and then add more complex tasks to your schedule. Learn what things do in the language. Learn how to assemble pieces of code to work together to accomplish the task that you have decided your program works for.

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I'll assume "beginner", since you haven't written anything yet. There are two approaches, choose an advanced language like Java, C, Python, etc. and try to learn it by learning simple concepts and building on those who learn more advanced concepts, OR the other approach is to start with a "learning language", something like Scratch.

I suggest the latter. Play with him for a week. Create simple things and then add more complex tasks to your schedule. Learn what things do in the language. Learn how to assemble pieces of code to work together to accomplish the task you have decided your program was going to do. Also, in that week learn to “debug” your program when it doesn't behave the way you want it to. This will be an essential and invaluable skill for every program you write because at first or even worse long after, it could fail.

Once you feel competent enough to move from the visual approach and want to write in a language that is used for professional applications and that software design or even coding is something that interests you, go to the first option to learn how. I described it in the first paragraph. Use an industry-grade language and start with small coding solutions, building from there by adding new and more powerful concepts.

In the beginning, you will naturally write procedurally oriented code. You will tend to think primarily in terms of what you want to do. You can write procedural code in any language, in fact, this is how the first programs were written, as procedural code. The code was written and executed so that the tasks in question were the focal point.

With more advanced languages ​​(even in Scratch), you can think of your programs in a different way, in a way that does not follow the process, but in a way that "models" the elements within the set of problems that you are trying to solve. . write a code solution for. This is called "object" programming.

Think of it this way, in procedural programming, it is the procedure or ACTION, the main essential objective of the design. Take the actions. What action happens next? Etc. Meanwhile, in object programming, it is the objects that are relevant to your problem. What objects are involved in the problem you want to solve? What can each object do? How do objects interact with each other? etc.

If you take a step back, you will notice that just like this sentence and the other sentences I have written, there is a noun (object) and a verb (action) in each. Therefore, object programming is like thinking of nouns and verbs when constructing a sentence. Object programming, then, is just like talking! And we all know how to do it, right?

Object programming is a bit more difficult to grasp in concept, but it really shouldn't be that way because we all deal with objects and actions every day. When we choose a new technological device that we have never used before, what do we do? We see a button or lever (noun / object), and we wonder, what can it do (verb / action)?

So in short, procedural programming is defining all the actions that need to occur, and you start writing sequential code that progresses through performing the actions. Object programming provides models (code) for each object that you are trying to model and provides the actions (what each object can do). As an example, you might have code that models a player in a game, with the player being the object / noun. Then define what the player is capable of doing or the forms of behavior (actions). It's actually quite a fun way to think about programming.

I could go deeper here, but I think I picked a good stopping point that keeps it simple, but provides an overview of the "beginning", which was your initial question.

I would like to answer this particular question, especially due to my similar experiences. Before my colg, I was completely unaware of any word called C ++, java, or even programming. Now I am a machine learning developer and coding is now my hobby and my stress reliever too. I'll tell you where I started from.

1.If you are completely unfamiliar with programming, you must first learn how to program in C. It will give you an idea of ​​what programming is. Learn about compilers and interpreters, and get in line with terms like source code, interpreted code, and more. text editor and start with normal codes using or

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I would like to answer this particular question, especially due to my similar experiences. Before my colg, I was completely unaware of any word called C ++, java, or even programming. Now I am a machine learning developer and coding is now my hobby and my stress reliever too. I'll tell you where I started from.

1.If you are completely unfamiliar with programming, you must first learn how to program in C. It will give you an idea of ​​what programming is. Learn about compilers and interpreters, and get in line with terms like source code, interpreted code, and more. text editor and start with normal codes using operators, learn functions and their return types, learn about data types and data structures like what an array is, slowly increase your level to perform simple transformations on the array, like inverting it, etc. try to make simple applications.

2.If you want to be good at programming, you need to study data structures, their operations, which one to use, where, and of course algorithms. Think in terms of how fast and using less memory your few lines can solve the problem, so learn and incorporate the complexity of time and the complexity of space. At first it will get out of your head, but over time it will settle in your mind.

3.Learn Java to get started with any OOP, see how procedural and object-oriented programming differs. Learn how to perform data structure operations without pointers. You will be introduced to a lot of cool stuff like multithreading and exception handling. Again practice the same questions in Java. I would suggest sticking to an OOP at first and being a master at it, then going to any new language like Python or Scala.

4. When you have mastered a language, start learning about java frameworks, collections, and gradually learn about web services.

5. Speaking of resources, there are many available online. My personal favorites are:

http://www.tutorialspoint.com/

Tutorials - Javatpoint

java brains - YouTube

C Tutorial - Learn C - Cprogramming.com

https://way2java.com/ (my favorite)

I prefer to read books, so here are a few

  1. Come on here by yashwant kanetkar
  2. Test your C skills by yashwant kanetkar
  3. Reema thareja data structures and algorithms.
  4. Herbert Schildt's Java
  5. C by herbert schildt.

Lastly, I would say that I have read many books throughout my life, but I have realized that no knowledge is good for programming unless you code it. Unless you like to debug your code by trying what went wrong, you can't be good at it. So use this site, sign up and do a 30 day trial and do the same problem in C and Java.

HackerRank

I'll end with one of my motivational phrases "hard work beats talent when talent doesn't work hard" so there is no replacement for trying and trying again. Write me for any questions.

Happy coding!

Enough to send the products that interest them.

Usually that requires at least a general-purpose imperative language (C ++, Java, Python, etc.) for product code, an imperative scripting language to automate things (Perl, Python, Bourne shell, PowerShell, etc.) and a declarative compilation. system (make, cmake, buck, etc.).

It can mean additional tools specific to the task at hand: JavaScript for front-end web, SQL for relational databases, yacc or bison for parser generation, assembler to exploit non-standard processor features.

Experience product shipping (this may take more than 15 years

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Enough to send the products that interest them.

Usually that requires at least a general-purpose imperative language (C ++, Java, Python, etc.) for product code, an imperative scripting language to automate things (Perl, Python, Bourne shell, PowerShell, etc.) and a declarative compilation. system (make, cmake, buck, etc.).

It can mean additional tools specific to the task at hand: JavaScript for front-end web, SQL for relational databases, yacc or bison for parser generation, assembler to exploit non-standard processor features.

Product shipping experience (this can take over 15 years to handle well) and domain knowledge (distributed systems, storage, applications, embedded, robotics) are important, but specific languages ​​can be acquired as required.

Microsoft hired me to make distributed systems in C # that I had never seen before, Amazon Java that I had once played for a consulting client who hired me to fix problems created by their "Java programmers".

I chose Tcl because it was easier to embed at the time, and Python because that's what the company used. Although I am a systems software guy, I have even written product code in PHP.

Good engineers can be immediately useful in new languages, although it obviously takes more time to write clean idiomatic code.

It is surprising that today there are so many courses available online to learn just about any subject you want. That said, there are plenty of options, and sifting through all of them to find the best ones can be overwhelming.

If you are an absolute beginner and want to learn Python, there are 3 or 4 courses that I highly recommend.

First, start with the Python hint from Codecademy. It is not very long and it is not very challenging either, but it is aimed at absolute beginners. This will help you become familiar with the syntax and structure of the language.

I would also recommend "Python for Everybo

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It is surprising that today there are so many courses available online to learn just about any subject you want. That said, there are plenty of options, and sifting through all of them to find the best ones can be overwhelming.

If you are an absolute beginner and want to learn Python, there are 3 or 4 courses that I highly recommend.

First, start with the Python hint from Codecademy. It is not very long and it is not very challenging either, but it is aimed at absolute beginners. This will help you become familiar with the syntax and structure of the language.

I would also recommend the “Python for Everyone” specialization on Coursera; This course is geared towards absolute beginners as well, and Dr. Chuck's easy and enjoyable teaching style is really enjoyable. Try to keep your programming as intimidating as possible.

Then look at MITx: 6.00.1x Introduction to Computer Science and Python Programming, in EdX. This course now uses Python 3, but since it's still introductory, it's not a big deal; Most of the code used in the course is at the intersection of Python 2 and 3. For this course, you will have to install Python on your computer and thus it will help you move from simply coding in your browser, as in Codecademy, to actually do programming on your computer with an IDE, text editor, or Python's interactive environment, which is how most professional programmers do.

The MIT course also begins with the basics (ie "hello world!"), But the difficulty increases rapidly. The course is challenging but also very rewarding if you can stick with it and solve all the problems and exercises.

Finally, check out the Fundamentals of Computer Science Major on Coursera. This course allows you to create games with Python, so it covers topics complementary to the other courses mentioned above.

Good luck!

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You must first find out why a new programming language is necessary when hundreds and thousands already exist.

Second, you have to decide how to handle program errors, such as accessing an out-of-range array element - will this reliably trigger a detectable / manageable error? Will the error be ignored as if nothing bad happened? Will this reliably end the program in place? or it is left as undefined behavior (TM). The choice you make should be applied consistently for all types of failure scenarios.

Third, you need to figure out how to handle error situations, whether they are exception or

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You must first find out why a new programming language is necessary when hundreds and thousands already exist.

Second, you have to decide how to handle program errors, such as accessing an out-of-range array element - will this reliably trigger a detectable / manageable error? Will the error be ignored as if nothing bad happened? Will this reliably end the program in place? or it is left as undefined behavior (TM). The choice you make should be applied consistently for all types of failure scenarios.

Third, you need to figure out how to handle error situations, either as an exception or by using error codes that each caller must tediously check.

If you opt for an exception, I strongly suggest that you use RAII, that is, objects that become inaccessible due to the thrown exception should have their destructors called for immediate cleanup. Another alternative is to leave them to the garbage collector to clean up later, but this will only solve memory usage issues (up to a point) and not other resources like open file handles, open database connections, blocked mutexes, etc. trick called "finally", I can't really recommend that.

Now that we've decided on the crucial aspects of runtime behavior, we can get closer to the actual language. The first important decision here is whether the language will have value semantics or reference semantics. In a language with value semantics (like Lisp and other functional languages) objects are basically immutable, so you can change whatever you have to build new objects. In a language with reference semantics like Java or Python you can easily change a small part of an object and the change will be visible through all references that refer to that object; to make a new object, a special copy operation would be needed. Semantic languages ​​of value are conceptually simpler and therefore theoretically easier to get right,

If you choose value semantics, you must decide whether you want real physical value semantics or copy-on-write emulation of value semantics, possibly keeping sub-objects unchanged in shared use. This is a technical detail, but it will affect overall memory usage and language performance.

The next step would be to decide which programming paradigms your language will support: procedural, object-oriented, functional, compile-time polymorphism, and so on. language, but a semantic language of value would not benefit as much from object-oriented programming. Of course, you can make some kind of hybrid language by mixing different paradigms.

Finally, we come to the syntax part of the language. The syntax of the language should reflect the previous choices and, of course, try to make the life of the programmer easier. There is a difference based on the duration of the expected programs or subroutines. The syntax that is best for 10-line programs would become FTW for 1000-line programs, and possibly vice versa. One thing to keep in mind is that if your language becomes popular people will start to make 1,000 and maybe 1,000,000 line programs in it, so you should better design for scale.

There are many technical details like the scope / lifespan of the variables, if it is a compiled or interpreted language, if it has strong typeface, attached typeface or not, if global variables are allowed, etc. These too need to be decided, but they are not as essential to the design of the core language.

Therefore, there are many options that you must make. I guess the only point where you have no choice is how to implement your new language - it should be implemented in C ++. And it should be open source to get traction.

You wait until it really exists as a thing. It may already exist in some top-secret research laboratory, but being top-secret, neither you nor I will know.

Or you do the groundwork in science and engineering and actually create programmable nanobots. Someone has to do it first. If you do, make it easy to program.

One of the viable options would be to study computational nanoelectronics and start building your own program to simulate semiconductors, nanomaterials, and quantum mechanics.

You may need to use scientific packages and the most appropriate language to learn for your case is obviously Python at the moment. Since you have a bit of C experience this should be easy. You can start with a basic machine learning tutorial on Kaggle.

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