What professions are overrated and why?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Titan Sosa



What professions are overrated and why?

As a civil engineer with a career of more than 3 decades starting in road design, utilities and site works, then progressing to project engineering / project management of "vertical" projects (buildings) as well as jobs civil / on-site / utilities, I'll say: based on my experience:

Architect

In a construction project, the architect is basically the lead designer, all other disciplines must follow suit to "complete" the architect's concept. This is always ready for "static", especially from the Structural discipline, which needs to support the architect's concept, make sure it withstands wind / seismic loads,

Keep reading

As a civil engineer with a career of more than 3 decades starting in road design, utilities and site works, then progressing to project engineering / project management of "vertical" projects (buildings) as well as jobs civil / on-site / utilities, I'll say: based on my experience:

Architect

In a construction project, the architect is basically the lead designer, all other disciplines must follow suit to "complete" the architect's concept. This is always ready for "static", especially from the structural discipline, which needs to support the architect's concept, make sure it withstands wind / seismic loads and does not interfere with "wide open spaces" inside.

In my experience, many architects learn in university more about the aesthetics and history of architecture, the various styles and schools, and many of their academic projects, etc., focus on the use of space and visual aesthetics (" form follows function ").

However, once they enter the real world, where the vast majority will end up working on smaller and "routine" projects (not designing "monumental" type buildings), especially when it comes to designing "worldly" type buildings / "utilitarian". as designed by our agency (mainly maintenance facilities for trains, buses, snow plows, and some airport facilities and train stations), much of that training goes against what the "customer" (ie me, as manager project, as a representative of my agency) wishes. We want a building that is functional, complies with building code, is designed on time and on budget, and has contract documents (blueprints, specifications) that are completed on time ("frozen" at the time of bidding / RFP, and not continuously worked or billed on customer time), easily understandable by the contractors and inspectors who will subsequently build it, without daily prompts for Supplemental "schematic drawings" to fill in missing details. We didn't care much about "visual aesthetics" nor did we want to spend many days on color selections to get the exact 54-possible shade of white, which had to be seen in both bright sunny and cloudy conditions (they surely racked up the site fees of visit for this). We also wanted proper code enforcement, not constant requests for "waivers" from "authorities that have jurisdictions." since the architect undoubtedly "knows more". cloudy day conditions (they sure racked up site visit fees for this). We also wanted proper code enforcement, not constant requests for "exemptions" from "authorities that have jurisdictions" as the architect certainly "knows best." cloudy day conditions (they sure racked up site visit fees for this). We also wanted proper code enforcement, not constant requests for "exemptions" from "authorities that have jurisdictions" as the architect certainly "knows best." not constant requests for "exemptions" from the "authorities having jurisdictions", as the architect undoubtedly "knows best". cloudy day conditions (they sure racked up site visit fees for this). We also wanted proper code enforcement, not constant requests for "exemptions" from "authorities that have jurisdictions" as the architect certainly "knows best." not constant requests for "exemptions" from the "authorities having jurisdictions", as the architect undoubtedly "knows best". cloudy day conditions (they sure racked up site visit fees for this). We also wanted proper code enforcement, not constant requests for "exemptions" from "authorities that have jurisdictions" as the architect certainly "knows best."

Now, I'm not here to "criticize" architects in general, in fact I felt bad for many of them who suffered severe abuse from the "field" guys (inspectors / contractors) for all the inconsistencies, then the battle constant I had with their chief consultants when I expected them to "fix" these issues without overbilling, as in my opinion we paid for a full design at the time of bidding. Of course it is always difficult, as a building is actually constructed from "shop drawings" and not design drawings, as in our field of public tender we could not select materials / manufacturers in advance, for so the "pieces" could be quite different. depending on the product selected by the contractors. I often had to explain that to my bosses and the guys in the field when I was static about how many architectural consulting bills under construction were piling up.

It seemed to me that most architects were paid less than us engineers, but an architecture degree requires 5 years while an engineering degree requires 4. Also, most architecture schools are private and have a higher tuition. high. Also, the licensing tests are longer and more rigorous for architects (for engineers it is more a matter of "math proficiency").

It also seems that, as I said earlier, the architect curriculum has more to do with "artistic" things than the practicalities of producing a coherent set of plans and specifications that a contractor can build without much supplemental information. I have been out of the profession for over 5 years, and the use of 3D "BIM" models for building design (as opposed to traditional 2-d plans, sections, elevations, and details) was just getting into a "routine " smaller. projects like I oversaw (several of which exceeded several hundred million, therefore relatively "small") that promised BIG improvement in coordination. It was going to require smaller contractors to familiarize themselves with BIM and

Again, I'm not trying to 'beat up' architects, it just seems that many enter the profession after school with a skewed understanding of what their desired role is (conversely, I, as a "utilitarian" type building manager ", not understanding the importance of the" artistic "side of architecture when it comes to" monumental "type projects). I would say that their job is much more stressful as they face constant turmoil from us engineers who want things well defined, well understood, finished on time, easy to build, with minimal payroll inflation. And again, their education requirements are higher than those of engineers, but their pay scales are the same or slightly lower.

Car dealership technician.

The way car dealers have organized the payment structure is based on the way manufacturers pay for warranty repairs. If you are covered by the warranty and Ford pays the dealer 0.3 hours of labor, then the dealer, in turn, pays the technician 0.3 hours of labor at whatever his hourly rate. Somewhere in the massive range of around $ 10 / hour to the upper limit of around $ 60 / hour. Most are in the $ 20-30 / hr range. The problem is, we often do repairs that take more time than Ford, and subsequently the dealer, pays for. Withdrawals typically pay 30% to 40% less than the time required.

Keep reading

Car dealership technician.

The way car dealers have organized the payment structure is based on the way manufacturers pay for warranty repairs. If you are covered by the warranty and Ford pays the dealer 0.3 hours of labor, then the dealer, in turn, pays the technician 0.3 hours of labor at whatever his hourly rate. Somewhere in the massive range of around $ 10 / hour to the upper limit of around $ 60 / hour. Most are in the $ 20-30 / hr range. The problem is, we often do repairs that take more time than Ford, and subsequently the dealer, pays for. Recalls typically pay 30% to 40% less than the time it takes to complete the repair.

Example: Retire 192220B (3.9 hours)

SLTS -
23943AT (0.5)
24943A6T (1.9)
24943A7T (0.3)
27406BT (0.3)
27406B5T (1.1)
27406B6T (0.3)

Total: 4.4

If we do this work as a guarantee, they pay 4.4 hours, as the customer pays it would be 6.6 hours, but as a reminder we get 3.9 hours.

So as a reminder, they pay us almost half of what you should pay.

Now consider a recent article in the Detroit Free Press about Ford and its warranty cost.

Here's what one of Ford's engineers had to say about it:

“We are ALWAYS looking to skin the people who are doing the repair as a way to save money due to a faulty component. ... we are facing a systemic problem that is only going to get worse. "

Renneker responded later the same day: "I have to present to Bennie Fowler early next month the steps we can take to reduce the $ 700 million warranty bill we received for DPS6."

Two years earlier, Fowler had complained about repair costs in an email to the powertrain purchasing and customer service managers. “Team, we will need your help to improve our performance in the fourth quarter… everyone is getting rich on dps6. This has cost us $ 3 a share in the share price. "

Imagine having a job where your salary depends on a company where previous mindsets rule the roost.

In the middle of all this are customers who want their vehicle repaired and technicians who are forced to put warranty repair work in the background so they can write a paycheck on customer-paid vehicles.

This job used to be a great job, but politics has destroyed it. Ford is bleeding technicians who leave and go to other fields where they are paid adequately and reliably.

Now add the factor of tools needed to do this job. Most technicians have to buy their own tools that cost thousands of dollars with no reimbursement. A few years ago, we could at least get a tax break, but Trump's recent tax reform removed that ability. We are now 100% responsible for our own tools. Personally, I have around $ 80,000 worth of tools. There are not many jobs that work for a company where an employee is responsible for such a large expense to do a job "for the company".

For these reasons, I think being a Ford dealer technician is highly overrated and I am sure many other manufacturer technicians feel the same way. I could say much more but I could write a book on this topic.

One last

Fact: Ford eliminated work operations on basically all directed repairs by an average of 50% in 2017.
Fact: Ford corporate employees enjoyed an average $ 9,000 bonus the same year.

Apparently, Ford does not consider "skinning" us to pay for the theft of defective parts (a 58% reduction in time in some cases).

Apparently our perspective, which is that they took 45-58% of our payment from us for some things, and then received an average $ 9K bonus for their efforts at the same time, is not theft to them, although it sure feels like if they had stolen from my pocket to line theirs!

Doing the toughest jobs in places like the military to show that you can do it too. Most of the time you can, but many don't want to. In the army I did 88L or a ship mechanic. I was excited. It was a less hard job than the one I had before, especially in terms of discipline. They didn't force us to do hundreds of physical therapy tests, we got money for meals instead of the dining room, and we had decent hours. Most of the guys only cared about fixing and maintaining the equipment. It was quite fascinating for them. They didn't care much about me.

I walked around the boat and cleaned the bilge, greased monkey. I had

Keep reading

Doing the toughest jobs in places like the military to show that you can do it too. Most of the time you can, but many don't want to. In the army I did 88L or a ship mechanic. I was excited. It was a less hard job than the one I had before, especially in terms of discipline. They didn't force us to do hundreds of physical therapy tests, we got money for meals instead of the dining room, and we had decent hours. Most of the guys only cared about fixing and maintaining the equipment. It was quite fascinating for them. They didn't care much about me.

I walked around the boat and cleaned the bilge, greased monkey. I had a strange sergeant who made me buy boots and uniforms. He was a great sergeant, stuck on repetition. I keep changing them for training. This is my work partner, not pretty. I keep having to crawl into the cesspool again because I wasn't smart enough for the actual job, so I had to do what no one else wanted to do, covered in sweat and oil every day. I slept a couple of times and earned bad karma. It's like, now you have a bad name, mwahaha, enjoy the vapors of doom. I had some weird issues with it too. Green machine malfunction: error, operator error.

When we set sail, I threw up non-stop, but I learned that you can sleep on a cot in the engine room and still get to sleep before the next shift like you're on a feather bed in the sky. Is noisy. Smells bad. Tremble. But it will bother you to get up.

We went to this museum / show where we parked our boat. I got tons of comments about how good it was to be the only woman on the ship and I stood up for my sisters.

Be my guest…

Some women would love to have that job, I'm sure. There were not many of us in those fields. I'm just saying, don't do something just because you want to show that you can do it. Do something that you can do and that you can stick with long enough to gain experience and skills.

However, 14T was a fun MOS. He was driving a truck with empty missiles. They were much stricter in that field, we did a lot of PT, but I will never forget how beautiful the sunsets from the field, the yucca plants and the sand are. It was like another planet. In winter, the stars were so clear. Texas has the best skies.

Doctors of Medicine.

Obviously, it is a very important role, but it is a role with quite distorted perceptions.

  • The salaries are high since it is a very protected profession. You need to take years of expensive education and then take a few basic years to be a full-fledged doctor. Despite all the years of training, you will end up specializing in some niche area and forgetting about everything else or doing general medicine, you will become a gatekeeper and simply recommend anything strange to specialists. The number of medical students entering the university is deliberately limited. This means that even though yes
Keep reading

Doctors of Medicine.

Obviously, it is a very important role, but it is a role with quite distorted perceptions.

  • The salaries are high since it is a very protected profession. You need to take years of expensive education and then take a few basic years to be a full-fledged doctor. Despite all the years of training, you will end up specializing in some niche area and forgetting about everything else or doing general medicine, you will become a gatekeeper and simply recommend anything strange to specialists. The number of medical students entering the university is deliberately limited. This means that despite years of constant high volumes of applications to medical courses, there is always a shortage of physicians. Ultimately, all of this adds costs to the consumer; the patient.
  • Most medical professionals chose this career for prestige, salary, and security. Not for dealing with patients. To be honest, if we did, why did we charge so much?
  • The selection is based on academics, but a good doctor really needs to be practical and pragmatic. Smart clogs are incorporated into programs and then struggle to handle patients. This may be one of the reasons for the previous point about motivation.
  • The dirty secret is that this job is not as academically demanding as it sounds. Medicine is really applied biology with some chemistry (that is, memory-based with a heavy practical element). Biochemistry, engineering, and physics degrees sound more difficult and involve more math.
  • However, the role and training require many hours and a lot of stress. A lot of stress.
  • Most roles involve spending long hours with the sick and the elderly (despite what the television tells us).

Be a politician and part of the government.

If you are bored with life, didn't have a great job, or just want easy money. And you don't want to become a criminal or a mafia, become a politician.

It's easy, if you have charisma, communicative personality, etc.

And if you have already liked and supported a lot of people, they choose you for the position.

Now you can spend tons of money and earn a lot of money, spend that money on your luxury mansions, items, etc.

Translation: Democratic cadres are such professional and professional corrupters

Corruption and government are inseparable.

Keep reading

Be a politician and part of the government.

If you are bored with life, didn't have a great job, or just want easy money. And you don't want to become a criminal or a mafia, become a politician.

It's easy, if you have charisma, communicative personality, etc.

And if you have already liked and supported a lot of people, they choose you for the position.

Now you can spend tons of money and earn a lot of money, spend that money on your luxury mansions, items, etc.

Translation: Democratic cadres are such professional and professional corrupters

Corruption and government are inseparable.

There is no reason for me to trust a government

I don't trust the government and I never will.

If you want, you can be a corrupt government and your supporters will blindly ignore you.

Like Cuomo many times:

Remember, if you become a politician. You can afford a lot of corrupt things.

Like :

Imagine how much money you can take from taxpayers and then distribute it between your wife's Gucci bags and Jimmy Choo shoes, your daughter's Barbie collections, your son's new drone and the latest hot wheels, your trip to Bali and Dubai, etc. how much money you can take from taxpayers. You'll be rich instantly without having to worry about losing money (although you have to worry about your voters, don't worry, just create false data about the people who vote the most for you).

Again, if you want to be rich without skills and you are too charismatic.

Become a politician, it's an easy job a baby can get.

The most overrated profession is that of a manager.

You have to deal with subordinates, earn their respect, and, to some extent, fear as well. You can't be too friendly with them, but you can't be too distant either.

And the biggest problem: a manager is totally dependent on the performance of his subordinates. If they rebel or sabotage their tasks, the manager's head will roll.

In addition, each subordinate thinks that he could fill the position of manager and do better. Of course, there are many intrigues and intrigues.

Also each manager is subordinate or serves someone. I've seen the middle managers harassed

Keep reading

The most overrated profession is that of a manager.

You have to deal with subordinates, earn their respect, and, to some extent, fear as well. You can't be too friendly with them, but you can't be too distant either.

And the biggest problem: a manager is totally dependent on the performance of his subordinates. If they rebel or sabotage their tasks, the manager's head will roll.

In addition, each subordinate thinks that he could fill the position of manager and do better. Of course, there are many intrigues and intrigues.

Also each manager is subordinate or serves someone. I have seen middle managers bullied and mistreated by their superiors like some victims of bullying at school. And they have nowhere to turn, not to their subordinates, not to the unions.

It is also a very lonely position. And there is no love lost between peer managers. They are competitors, who will stab each other in the back the first time.

Even great bosses can be mistreated or simply fired in a short time by larger bosses or shareholders.

When it comes to compensation, sometimes the difference between a simple worker and an average manager is not great enough to justify all the stress.

Also in tough times, when layoffs are decided, only the crucial expert level people, who bring in real money, can feel safe. The managers do not bring money, so they will be the first to pack their belongings in cardboard boxes.

It is also more difficult for a manager to find a new job. A manager close to retirement age will have great difficulty finding something.

Airline pilot.

They are basically the sky bus drivers. A tight flight schedule rules their lives.

Contrary to what many people might think, flying for them has nothing to do with "enjoying the endless skies", it means going from A to B, not only on time, but also with the lowest possible fuel consumption. .

The more fuel they save, the more profit their airlines will make.

Photo: Kölnische Rundschau

His work isn't really glamorous (maybe it was sixty years ago) and it's not that well paid either. Many pilots in the United States struggle financially.

Airline pilots don't go to bed as often anymore. First,

Keep reading

Airline pilot.

They are basically the sky bus drivers. A tight flight schedule rules their lives.

Contrary to what many people might think, flying for them has nothing to do with "enjoying the endless skies", it means going from A to B, not only on time, but also with the lowest possible fuel consumption. .

The more fuel they save, the more profit their airlines will make.

Photo: Kölnische Rundschau

His work isn't really glamorous (maybe it was sixty years ago) and it's not that well paid either. Many pilots in the United States struggle financially.

Airline pilots don't go to bed as often anymore. First of all, due to their extremely tight schedules, they will arrive at their destination stressed and exhausted.

Instead of having a Daiquiri with a sexy bikini-clad girl at a beach bar in Rio de Janeiro, they will prefer to sleep in their moderately priced hotel room (a room for two). If they score, it's probably just someone on their team.

Unfortunately, however, flight attendants aren't that keen on having fun either. His job has also become extremely difficult and stressful.

Commercial airplane pilot

You probably know someone from your childhood who wanted to become a "pilot."

First of all, you don't need a professional degree to become a pilot other than an X-hour flight license (google it), certification from a flight school.

Today, almost everything in the cockpit is automated or put on autopilot once the plane is in the air. Like the path that is predicted, they just have to avoid sleeping inside the cabin and keep their ears open.

Yes, they do get credit for taking off and landing, however it's still not very exciting when you've done it multiple times.

Keep reading

Commercial airplane pilot

You probably know someone from your childhood who wanted to become a "pilot."

First of all, you don't need a professional degree to become a pilot other than an X-hour flight license (google it), certification from a flight school.

Today, almost everything in the cockpit is automated or put on autopilot once the plane is in the air. Like the path that is predicted, they just have to avoid sleeping inside the cabin and keep their ears open.

Yes, they take the credit for taking off and landing, however it still isn't very exciting when you've done it multiple times.

Most pilots stay away from home due to hectic flight hours. During their working hours they can stay in 3 * 4 * and 5 * hotels. But you are still alone and not at home.

Personally, I think people become pilots because of leaving ... Staying at work for huge pay ... and resigning out of frustration or boredom.

Commercial Aircraft Pilots = #ExpensiveUberDriver

However, being a fighter plane pilot is a different game!

Some I can think of ...

Lawyer

Many people seem to think that:

  1. Lawyers are super smart and
  2. Earning a JD degree is a ticket to a lot of money.

Here I will address both notions:

  1. Unlike the hard sciences, there is nothing in the law school curriculum that is intellectually challenging. Although it requires a lot of reading and memorization (and therefore a lot of hard work), it does not require taking classes in, say, theoretical physics, calculus, algorithms, mathematical / logical induction, the scientific method, etc. , requires that one sometimes selectively abandon science and logic in the interest
Keep reading

Some I can think of ...

Lawyer

Many people seem to think that:

  1. Lawyers are super smart and
  2. Earning a JD degree is a ticket to a lot of money.

Here I will address both notions:

  1. Unlike the hard sciences, there is nothing in the law school curriculum that is intellectually challenging. Although it requires a lot of reading and memorization (and therefore a lot of hard work), it does not require taking classes in, say, theoretical physics, calculus, algorithms, mathematical / logical induction, the scientific method, etc. , requires that one sometimes selectively abandon science and logic for the sake of winning arguments and influencing juries through rhetoric.
  2. The lawyers who become very wealthy and successful are a minority, and these are usually the ones who graduate from the most prestigious schools and / or have strong natural rhetorical / argumentative skills (or have connections). For every super wealthy attorney you see in Congress, being interviewed on CNN, or handling high-profile cases, there are dozens (at least) who are handling real estate closings, chasing ambulances, or stuck at a desk reviewing contracts.

If you really want to be a lawyer (and not just the idea of ​​being a lawyer or the prestige you think it will bring you), find a specific subfield to focus on and maybe get a (non-legal) degree related to that domain first. Next, try getting into a reputable law school and, if possible, revolve your elective curriculum around that domain. For example: If you want to major in patent law, first get a bachelor's degree (or preferably a postgraduate degree) in, say, engineering.

"Scheduler" (note the quotes)

I say this as someone who is a programmer / software engineer. Learning to program and create web applications through a coding boot camp or online tutorial is not the same as striving to become a true computer scientist / software engineer and building high performance, scalable, secure, robust and forgiving to failures. , distributed, enterprise-grade solutions in the context of a real-world organization.

Before jumping on the coding train, ask yourself if you are really up to the task of (1) learning the fundamentals of computer science such as algorithms and data structures (and their mathematical prerequisites), (2) spending hours revising / rewriting / refactoring other people's code every day, and (3) being responsible for maintaining systems that are handling endless transactions 24 hours a day. (The latter is increasingly becoming a reality for developers as companies cut costs and development teams are expected to absorb "development operations" tasks.)

"Data scientist"

Much of what I said about "programmers" also applies here. Know some basic Python coding, import pandas / tensorflow / etc. libraries, and following the DataCamp tutorials might be a good place to start, but it won't be enough for you to be successful in the field. As with software engineering, if you want to be a real data scientist, be prepared for years of rigorous education and training in the fundamentals (i.e., the structure of database systems, algorithms, statistics theory / probability and ideally multivariate calculus if you intend to focus on the AI ​​/ ML side of data science).

Question: What is the most overrated profession?

Answer: Actors and actresses.

An actor is a person whose profession is to act on stage, in movies, or on television.

Depending on the type of movies they will make, they portray an image to the audience for which they gain popularity.

Simply put, an actor works to portray a character in a movie, play, television show, stage production, or any other variety of performance.

Depending on the type of role or popularity they have, they can raise between millions of dollars and a few hundred dollars as well.

Not forgetting the billions wasted in the film were

Keep reading

Question: What is the most overrated profession?

Answer: Actors and actresses.

An actor is a person whose profession is to act on stage, in movies, or on television.

Depending on the type of movies they will make, they portray an image to the audience for which they gain popularity.

Simply put, an actor works to portray a character in a movie, play, television show, stage production, or any other variety of performance.

Depending on the type of role or popularity they have, they can raise between millions of dollars and a few hundred dollars as well.

Not forgetting billions wasted on movie sets as well.

Although some movies are really interesting and the characters play an important role in making everything interesting. But these days a lot of CGI is added to make it look real.

This has reduced the need for huge movie sets, but reality is dwindling on them.

Sources:

How CGI changed movies forever This publicity image for the movie published by Disney Pixar shows the characters Woody, left, and Buzz Lightyear, from the animated film. For most of us, a trip to the movies is an opportunity for a choc top and a few hours of escapism. But have you ever stopped to wonder what it takes to create some of our favorite scenes, the ones that have us on the edge of our seats, hiding behind our hands, or sobbing all over the place? The term CGI may be ringing bells. Computer generated imagery (CGI) is used to digitally create animation and special effects in film and television, and while it all started with traditional animation, Later technology has seen artists drop their pens and turn to their screens. Computer animation in film began in the 1970s when visual effects and short animations were created using 2D image overlay. In 1972, Pixar co-founders Ed Catmull and Fred Park created the first prototype of a digitally rendered 3D hand using technology that would be the basis for countless effects and cinematic masterpieces that followed. In 1993 we witnessed a magical moment in the history of computer-generated cinema: we saw our first dinosaur. Jurassic Park was the first CGI movie with 'physical texture', which means those dinosaurs looked incredibly realistic on screen. But it didn't happen overnight. The team at the visual effects house ILM started with drawn designs and prosthetics of the dinosaurs before scanning them into a computer. Animation software was used to identify and manipulate the movements of the hands and feet before painting the dinosaur skin texture. Once these separate images were put together, the dinosaurs were placed in one scene and combined with live action scenes and locations. CGI Creating Full Movies Until the late 1990s, CGI was used sparingly, but in 1995 Toy Story became the first CGI feature film. With just a small team of animators, our favorite characters, from Woody to Buzz Lightyear, came to life. Pixar followed up this great project with a host of CG animations like Monsters Inc., Finding Nemo, and the sequels to Toy Story, the last one in 3D. CGI that recreates scenes from history Moving into the millennium CGI reached new heights when technicians used computer graphics in live-action movies to recreate real events. In 2001, audiences saw the Japanese attack on a US naval base at Pearl Harbor. The attack was filmed using two shots of the USS Arizona and a handful of visual effects to model the sequence, create body simulations, and insert plumes of smoke. In the early 2000s, audiences were once again in awe when a fully rendered computer-generated character appeared on screen. Motion capture, a strand of CGI that slipped into mainstream cinema at an astonishing rate, allowed the recording of movements made by objects or people. In Peter Jackson's 2001 film The Lord of the Rings, Gollum was the first character captured in motion to come face-to-face with other actors. Traditional animation was combined with artificial intelligence, so https://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/2016/05/12/how-cgi-changed-movies-forever_a_21358758/ What happens to movie props after the shooting? sold at auction, shipped to a studio-owned warehouse, or hosted by the production designer. They can go to a museum, another film set, themed restaurants, private collections, or even the trash can. The producer and the studio generally decide what happens to the assets.

Controversial, but right tackle in the NFL.

The advantages are obvious:

  • You make millions of dollars a year
  • You have the prestige of playing in the NFL

But the disadvantages are considerable:

  • It is one of the lowest paid positions in the field.
  • It's probably the most anonymous position on the field.
  • It implies a strong impact in each play.
  • The useful life of these positions is very low, probably 3 years or less.
  • The chances of having multiple concussions are high.
  • The chances of getting CTE or other long-term brain disorders are high.
  • You need to maintain a very high weight, which will likely result in obesity (a
Keep reading

Controversial, but right tackle in the NFL.

The advantages are obvious:

  • You make millions of dollars a year
  • You have the prestige of playing in the NFL

But the disadvantages are considerable:

  • It is one of the lowest paid positions in the field.
  • It's probably the most anonymous position on the field.
  • It implies a strong impact in each play.
  • The useful life of these positions is very low, probably 3 years or less.
  • The chances of having multiple concussions are high.
  • The chances of getting CTE or other long-term brain disorders are high.
  • You need to maintain a very high weight, which will likely result in obesity (and all the health problems that come with it) after retirement.

So you get to protect the quarterback for a couple of years, make some great coin, but likely be in considerable pain and have a significantly reduced life span afterward?

I’ll pass.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.