What professions are most likely to be depressed?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Kai Foster



What professions are most likely to be depressed?

These are not in any particular order.
Remember, most people get involved with the idea that they will help others and earn enough money to live. I have seen as patients in each of these areas, so I will answer for the problems that generate depression problems.

  • Health workers

These people tend to give and give and give. Dentists tend to be the worst since no one ever wants to see them. I've had ICU people who have seen too many die.
This group includes therapists, doctors, nurses, in medical dynamics.

  • Social workers

I see these that after ten years of chronicles, they begin to have glassy eyes. They consist

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These are not in any particular order.
Remember, most people get involved with the idea that they will help others and earn enough money to live. I have seen as patients in each of these areas, so I will answer for the problems that generate depression problems.

  • Health workers

These people tend to give and give and give. Dentists tend to be the worst since no one ever wants to see them. I've had ICU people who have seen too many die.
This group includes therapists, doctors, nurses, in medical dynamics.

  • Social workers

I see these that after ten years of chronicles, they begin to have glassy eyes. Constantly grappling with the brink of disaster with all the bureaucratic red tape, and seeing the endless line of abused children or families, yes, it affects you.

  • Nursing Homes / Child Care Workers

This is one of those give, give, give abuse sometimes and no one really appreciates what it is like. When you are at the basic level of feeding, bathing and caring for others who are unable to wipe their butt.

  • Waiters

These guys are often on low pay and never take a break. They all tend to be in the same boat, so people tend to be very arrogant when it comes to introducing themselves. Others have to cover and take over when the system was set up to maximize everyone as it was. It is exhausting, along with a lot of people interrupting whatever it is with what you already feel a crisis, with a new one.

  • Teachers

I see many many teachers as patients and sadly many of the best are leaving. The requirements of what is supposed to be critical are constantly growing. The pressure is now coming from all directions and no one is satisfied. The atmosphere has turned all opposites. Also, they rarely leave the clock, as their work is also at home. And most use their meager pay to buy things that their classroom needs. They learn to do a lot with a little. The public is clueless, especially in light of the financial cuts. There wasn't enough before this game of blaming the conservatives began. Most cannot be in a romantic relationship for all kinds of reasons. Your own time is quite non-existent. Then there's the guy I was working with and he says everyone goes to school in college and they have friends who are in different professions. After graduation, everyone starts their careers and gets families going and then buys a home. Fast forward 10 years and everyone is getting better homes in better neighborhoods. I still have to watch every penny and will probably never be able to move. Most take work jobs in the summer to supplement their income. I still have to watch every penny and will probably never be able to move. Most take work jobs in the summer to supplement their income. I still have to watch every penny and will probably never be able to move. Most take work jobs in the summer to supplement their income.

  • Creative people: artists, writers, musicians, entertainers, and even programmers now.

Irregular pay checks, uncertain hours, and the amount of isolation can wreak havoc. You are never sure, never. More, more, more, they demand of you and with a twist of the wrist they can discard months of work. The new documentary
The Standbys does an amazing job showing what it's like.
Documentary Trailer: 'The Standbys' Tells The Story Of 3 Broadway Students

  • Administrative support staff

You have to be 100% and change when the boss does. Like a well-trained dog, don't take your eyes off the pack leader. There is a constant list of demands. And then there is the flack catcher where it is best to protect the Boss from any intrusion he does not want. They can also take orders from multiple bosses at the same time. They are on the front line, so he takes a hit with everything and knows his place at the bottom of the totem better.

  • Accountants and financial advisers.

Other people's money. If you have morals, handling thousands or millions of dollars for other people's money and reassuring them is the best thing for them because they trusted you, with absolutely no control; or ability to time the market. Stress, stress, and more stress.

  • Vendors

Many salespeople work on commission, which means you never know exactly when your next paycheck will arrive. Or if the last account is going to close you. You really are only as good as what just happened. The sand is constantly moving. Is it any wonder lying is an inevitable part of this profession? Survival every hour. Death of a salesman, Glen Gary, Glen Ross.

  • Mantenance staff

Every time there is something wrong or broken they call you. day or night. And it doesn't stop. One trouble carrier being introduced to you with another right behind. They just want to see you when something breaks. Some of them are seasonal problems and sometimes very bad changes. Some are actually poorly paid for very physically demanding jobs. Other people's messes.

  • Lawyers

Everybody hates you. Every conversation is tactical. Every word you say can cost you or earn you money. Make no mistakes. Excessive hours, little time for family or personal commitment, a highly competitive field, and constant scrutiny tend to make a double life virtually mandatory. Eventually, the house of cards always falls.

Which profession causes the most depression in people?

Full transparency I Googled this question because I was curious. I got mixed results, although doctors and dentists appear to lead with the highest suicide rates, followed by police officers, veterinarians, and financial services officers. As for depression, it appears that caregivers (nurses, etc.), teachers, social workers, farm workers, lawyers, and construction workers, are listed among those listed above. However, people who are unemployed have the highest rates of depression.

What did this tell me? Not much. People experience of

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Which profession causes the most depression in people?

Full transparency I Googled this question because I was curious. I got mixed results, although doctors and dentists appear to lead with the highest suicide rates, followed by police officers, veterinarians, and financial services officers. As for depression, it appears that caregivers (nurses, etc.), teachers, social workers, farm workers, lawyers, and construction workers, are listed among those listed above. However, people who are unemployed have the highest rates of depression.

What did this tell me? Not much. People experience depression across the spectrum of professions. While some very stressful jobs can lead to increased rates of depression, I think the goodness of fit between the individual and the job is a much more important factor. There are those who love, hate and everything in between, in all professions. The trick is to find something that works for you, rather than doing work that you think you should do because someone else thinks it makes sense, or because of the respect, status, or money that you think will earn you.

I'm not suggesting that you ignore the fact that we need money to pay our bills. This is a part of reality that cannot be ignored without dire consequences, but very few people actually seek jobs or careers that they are passionate about because they assume that working shouldn't feel good. It is one of the most unfortunate myths in modern society.

"It's work."

"It's just a job."

"Work is not supposed to be fun."

Well, I tell you this is not true. There is much pleasure and gratification to be gained from any job, whether it be washing dishes, teaching, doing surgery, or fixing someone's plumbing. You just have to find one or more that work for you at the current time in your life.

I add the variable of time, because these things change, and what you enjoy or are passionate about today may not be what floats your boat in 5 or 10 or 20 years. Know yourself and know what works for you. It is not always easy to realize this, because you must first recognize that your needs are not necessarily what everyone around you has been telling you.

While this is not one that is known to cause suicide, it is likely only because everyone knows the risks and therefore provides excellent mental health reports. UN peacekeeping and humanitarian aid worker, particularly those who provide medical and mental health care and interview refugees / internally displaced persons to find out the serious human rights violations they have suffered.

You are specifically told not to promise things that you cannot know or give. And that is heartbreak for the type of person who chooses humanitarian aid. You want to help as much as you can.

Also, everything I know

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While this is not one that is known to cause suicide, it is likely only because everyone knows the risks and therefore provides excellent mental health reports. UN peacekeeping and humanitarian aid worker, particularly those who provide medical and mental health care and interview refugees / internally displaced persons to find out the serious human rights violations they have suffered.

You are specifically told not to promise things that you cannot know or give. And that is heartbreak for the type of person who chooses humanitarian aid. You want to help as much as you can.

Also, all those things that they are telling you, you can check them second hand and, in cases where IDPs come to a CARE / Doctors Without Borders camp, the camp can be bombed or the armed forces can enter, and then Aid workers are dealing with it first hand, in many cases protecting IDPs / refugees because as a humanitarian worker, you are much less likely to have something bad happen to you than the refugees or IDPs you are protecting.

So yeah, in terms of the profession most at risk for depression (and fatigue where you just stop caring about someone other than a very small circle of people, which is very distressing for a person who has probably spent much of their life worrying too). a lot - you tend not to gravitate towards humanitarian aid unless you care), aid workers.

In the refugee and internally displaced persons class of my international law and human rights major, I spent at least a day discussing and exchanging ideas about this reality of work, as our teacher had seen this happen to many people, some of the which never returned to the NGOs. as work, much less as humanitarian aid.

Many people mentioned dentists and doctors. For most of us it would be a nightmare situation to have to take a knife and cut or prick someone. It is stressful and your empathy for other people's pain would have to be forcibly blocked. So maybe in a crisis, we could do it: stab someone in the windpipe who was choking or something, but we would probably have PTSD forever. Now imagine cutting or piercing the meat of a fully conscious person several times a day. Dentists are dental surgeons (hence the DDS), they are not like a general practitioner who consults in a

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Many people mentioned dentists and doctors. For most of us it would be a nightmare situation to have to take a knife and cut or prick someone. It is stressful and your empathy for other people's pain would have to be forcibly blocked. So maybe in a crisis, we could do it: stab someone in the windpipe who was choking or something, but we would probably have PTSD forever. Now imagine cutting or piercing the meat of a fully conscious person several times a day. Dentists are dental surgeons (hence the DDS), they are not like a general practitioner consulting in an office, they are performing surgeries (and unlike a typical medical surgeon) on fully conscious people who are highly stressed by it and do it repeatedly every day if they want to cover their lease space, provide a super hygienic environment for surgery, maintain their licenses and insurance , etc. Yes, you can own a boat, but it is very likely that you will spend that day on the boat receiving phone calls from people trying to trick you into prescribing drugs over the phone with the intention of abusing or selling them, follow-up care for patients who underwent surgery during the week, employees reporting sick for work and a call from the alarm company saying a door was left open and an alarm sounded. When do you have time to be a normal person? Or have your physical and emotional states returned to normal by being in nature or by reading or exercising? but it is very likely that you will spend that day on the ship taking phone calls from people trying to trick you into prescribing drugs over the phone with the intention of abusing or selling them, follow-up care for patients who underwent surgery during the week, employees calling in sick to go to work, and a call from the alarm company that a door was left open and an alarm sounded. When do you have time to be a normal person? Or have your physical and emotional states returned to normal by being in nature or by reading or exercising? but it is very likely that you will spend that day on the ship taking phone calls from people trying to trick you into prescribing drugs over the phone with the intention of abusing or selling them, follow-up care for patients who underwent surgery during the week, employees calling in sick to go to work, and a call from the alarm company that a door was left open and an alarm sounded. When do you have time to be a normal person? Or have your physical and emotional states returned to normal by being in nature or by reading or exercising? When do you have time to be a normal person? Or have your physical and emotional states returned to normal by being in nature or by reading or exercising? When do you have time to be a normal person? Or have your physical and emotional states returned to normal by being in nature or by reading or exercising?

Then on top of that, unlike a UFC fighter or soldier or tattoo artist (other professions where your job is to intentionally inflict harm on another person), you can't stand up to your pain-causing profession by wrapping yourself in motivational tattoos. . and badass gear. Rather, he's expected to be a khaki-clad yuppie with a Pintrest-ready family (if you disagree with me, maybe check out your local ads and notice the similarities). Actually, you can't even have a glass of wine with dinner in case you have an emergency. You cannot cope with the way the rest of society does with hard work.

Now imagine that same person (with blocked empathy paths) has to go home and try to be an authentic, loving and caring person, with their neighbors, children, spouse, parents, etc. Something very easy to do, which is why your personal relationships (which could have been a great source of emotional support) become very problematic. The fact that you can actually earn a living as a dentist masks the difficulties of this situation. No one in your social group can imagine that there is a downside, so you don't feel comfortable discussing the downsides or fear that people won't want you to be their dentist if you find it emotionally difficult work to do or if they find out. you see a counselor.

I really believe that most dentists (remember they entered dental school because they were tested as smart and caring people) would rather give away all the money they could earn in their life if people could avoid eating sugar, crackers, soda, etc. .And flossed his teeth! They'd be happy to be out of work (they're smart enough to get another job doing something else or they wouldn't have gotten into dental school in the first place) but as it stands, they have the training to do whatever. It is necessary to help people overcome the pain and additional health consequences, to do that job and pay off their school loans as they planned when they were naive 19-year-olds.

I tried to convince my ex-husband not to be a dentist when he was depressed or to go on very short hours (to help with his back and emotional problems). I suggested that the kids and I drive him to work every day so that we could only have one car; I grew up poor and he had the advantage of having a wife who knew how to cook a week's worth of meals with a chicken or how to fix clothes so that there was room to earn less money, but the business consultants had courted him. and I couldn't fight his influence or his own drive to keep doing more. I was the only person in the equation fighting for him as a person and eventually I had to withdraw. It is very sad for me. Even after the divorce, when I finally got a steady job, Once again I offered him that we could survive without child support due to my wits if he wanted to go back to school and re-educate himself or take a break or something. But, of course, I still had no influence on his decision.

I would definitely not recommend that someone go into this profession unless they have very healthy attitudes towards money (i.e. they have not grown up in poverty or neglect so that they have the ability not to care about money and do not see it as the only survival tool in the toolkit) and a strong call to help others regardless of personal cost. Also, if you have parents, friends or spouses who care about you and you are a dentist, shower those people with your love and affection, trust them about your struggles and take some time off to go to therapy, be in nature, invest . in their relationships, etc. It can be done especially if you have a good support system, but it takes time to keep investing in that support system, so you have to be willing to make that sacrifice.

DISCLAIMER: I am not using statistics or figures for this answer. I know this is a hot topic for some, so I'll be careful not to cause undue trouble for potential readers. These are simply my thoughts on the matter and are solely my responsibility. I have not been in any of the positions that I speak of, I simply interact with people I know who I have spoken with in great detail about their experiences.

In my opinion, there are two types of occupations that have the highest rates of depression. One of them is anything to do with combat operations. The other is a doctor

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DISCLAIMER: I am not using statistics or figures for this answer. I know this is a hot topic for some, so I'll be careful not to cause undue trouble for potential readers. These are simply my thoughts on the matter and are solely my responsibility. I have not been in any of the positions that I speak of, I simply interact with people I know who I have spoken with in great detail about their experiences.

In my opinion, there are two types of occupations that have the highest rates of depression. One of them is anything to do with combat operations. The other is a doctor, either at home or abroad.

By now, everyone has probably heard of the PTSD epidemic that has swept through the American veteran community in recent decades. (As a side note; yes, I know people want to be renamed to PTSD and drop the "disorder" part, but to me, that feels like a small change for pedantic people to argue. wrong, maybe I am not). Clearly, the reasons are many and varied. Above all, it has to do with the visceral nature of combat. Veterans have seen things they will never stop seeing, heard things they cannot get out of their heads, felt pain beyond anything you or I can imagine. The common depression in this field is due to lack of understanding. Veterans know that no one knows what it's like to hug someone while they die or pull someone's trigger. It's n 'It's a good feeling to know that no one around you knows your pain. You feel lonely and sad, resulting in severe depression.

The same applies to medical personnel. The standard EMT or paramedic has seen it all, literally. They are the first to arrive on the scene of murders, suicides, accidents, unexplained horrors. And if you haven't seen those things, it is impossible for you to understand what it is like. This leads to isolation and depression, just as it does with veterans.

Post-traumatic stress disorder is not lost. Don't take it lightly.

Some of my best successes are:

Telephone psychic

Sober house manager

Telephone salesperson

Management (virtually any leadership sucks)

Advice columnist

Writer

This seems like a pretty wide distribution. To be fair, as my credential points out, I have bipolar depression. However, there are some jobs that I usually enjoy, so it's not necessarily that all jobs are equally depressing. Examples:

Work / Factory / Many jobs where my body feels like it did something afterwards (but not all)

Bartending

Prep / line cook

Sales (retail)

Teacher / Trainer

While it is true that a depressed person will be depressed regardless, I believe that

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Some of my best successes are:

Telephone psychic

Sober house manager

Telephone salesperson

Management (virtually any leadership sucks)

Advice columnist

Writer

This seems like a pretty wide distribution. To be fair, as my credential points out, I have bipolar depression. However, there are some jobs that I usually enjoy, so it's not necessarily that all jobs are equally depressing. Examples:

Work / Factory / Many jobs where my body feels like it did something afterwards (but not all)

Bartending

Prep / line cook

Sales (retail)

Teacher / Trainer

While it is true that a depressed person will be depressed regardless, I think it is also true that different people will find fun and depression in different jobs. However, if what you're asking about is which job has the highest rate of depression, and if you were to deal with this seriously, though like so many people have, I'm not sure why it shouldn't lighten the mood. with my funny look. resume; yes, I have had all of those things listed above; I'd say something that involves kids dying a lot would probably be pretty high up. Something like juvenile oncology or working for children's services, maybe.

Although I imagine the worst of all jobs would be advertising. ;) -

I am a chronic depressive. From my twenties onwards (and I'm a boom), I've been to an antidepressant banquet, and I finally settled on Zoloft. First I was vice president of advertising, now I am a professional artist.

I really don't think professions can change brain chemistry. I know depressed people from all walks of life. I can tell you that they tend to be more emotional, more creative, and more skilled. Not always, but usually.

That said, I have heard that first responders, police officers, have unusually high rates of depression. That makes sense to me. Unlike most of us, they are not sh

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I am a chronic depressive. From my twenties onwards (and I'm a boom), I've been to an antidepressant banquet, and I finally settled on Zoloft. First I was vice president of advertising, now I am a professional artist.

I really don't think professions can change brain chemistry. I know depressed people from all walks of life. I can tell you that they tend to be more emotional, more creative, and more skilled. Not always, but usually.

That said, I have heard that first responders, police officers, have unusually high rates of depression. That makes sense to me. Unlike most of us, they are not protected from the darkest realms of the human spirit. They see horrible crime scenes, the worst of human behavior. Soldiers who have seen combat, same thing.

I think that chronic depression tends to have a strong genetic component and it is part of people who are very creative, perfectionist and emotional. Also empathetic. They are the ones who see the bad things on the news and their eyes fill with tears.

In short, I believe that depression is a complicated stew of genetics and environment, and I do not believe that professions / jobs "cause" depression. They can cause depressive episodes. But long-term chronic depression has a huge genetic component and is not tied to what you do for a living.

Professions do not cause depression, our perceptions of our profession cause depression.

Due to a misunderstanding of how the mind works, we as a society have understood that in order to change our reality, we have to change our circumstances.

If this were the case, life would really be out of our control, some of us have taken career paths that we no longer particularly enjoy, or have fallen into business, etc., and continue to pursue an elusive feeling of satisfaction in changing circumstances. . It is beyond insane.

When you understand that our thoughts about our circumstances form our reason

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Professions do not cause depression, our perceptions of our profession cause depression.

Due to a misunderstanding of how the mind works, we as a society have understood that in order to change our reality, we have to change our circumstances.

If this were the case, life would really be out of our control, some of us have taken career paths that we no longer particularly enjoy, or have fallen into business, etc., and continue to pursue an elusive feeling of satisfaction in changing circumstances. . It is beyond insane.

When you understand that our thoughts about our circumstances shape our reality, then you can be happy in any job, yes, I said anyone ... it's about how seriously you take your thoughts.

Once you have an idea of ​​how the mind works, everything will change.

As an advocate of standing up for yourself and following your passion, changing the things you don't like (as I did myself) for many years as a therapist, I had an awakening where I understood this in a moment. Contentment, joy, happiness, peace, fulfillment, security are only available from within in the moment, they do not come in any set of circumstances. As long as you believe they do, you will continue in a vicious cycle of misunderstanding, chasing an illusion.

What I would also add is that, what I'm not saying is that you should stay in a career that you don't like to love or that you feel is the right one for you. What we all have is an innate wisdom about what is right for us, and following that wisdom can make life a much more enjoyable experience in the moment.

I have observed this:

Dentists have a hard time, no one likes them, overhead is at least 70%, patients sometimes have unrealistic expectations of bridges and dentures, the general public does not appreciate the amount of expensive education that goes into He invested in this and the bill reflected that.

Pharmacists have a tough time too, having to constantly compete with Costco's low prescription fee. Some also have to subsidize some of the greedy doctors in general practice who wanted the pharmacist to pay their rent for the privilege of having their medical clinic within the pharmacy. This was sup

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I have observed this:

Dentists have a hard time, no one likes them, overhead is at least 70%, patients sometimes have unrealistic expectations of bridges and dentures, the general public does not appreciate the amount of expensive education that goes into He invested in this and the bill reflected that.

Pharmacists have a tough time too, having to constantly compete with Costco's low prescription fee. Some also have to subsidize some of the greedy doctors in general practice who wanted the pharmacist to pay their rent for the privilege of having their medical clinic within the pharmacy. This was supposed to increase the pharmacist's business. And of course the pharmacist also has to pay for the construction of the medical clinics for these greedy doctors.

Nurses have a hard time too. In a hospital, they see people here one day and tomorrow they leave. They do some of the dirtiest and stinkiest chores day after day and some days it's really depressing to see old age suck and sickness equates people. Life is fragile and it is depressing for nurses to see the struggles of patients fighting for their lives and then death takes hold of some.

Depression is not related to any work. It's your game of thoughts! If you lose in this game, you go into depression and if you win in this game, you will live a happier life. Depression is not related to any work. And any job can have depression! Try to understand this! Depression is not related to any job and in all jobs, man can fall into depression! Depression is not related to your job or your job. Depression is related to your thoughts. Your thoughts, your enthusiasm for the work you do. How excited and entertaining you are to work on it! If you are doing some uninteresting work

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Depression is not related to any work. It's your game of thoughts! If you lose in this game, you go into depression and if you win in this game, you will live a happier life. Depression is not related to any work. And any job can have depression! Try to understand this! Depression is not related to any job and in all jobs, man can fall into depression! Depression is not related to your job or your job. Depression is related to your thoughts. Your thoughts, your enthusiasm for the work you do. How excited and entertaining you are to work on it! If you are doing any work without interest, you will lose interest in life. You will live a boring and aimless life. you have to work in a helpless situation, then the problem arises, then you want to get rid of that job and then you start to feel like the job is slavery. And this is how your depression begins! And little by little you keep thinking negatively about that job, when you wake up in the morning, you have to go to work and you start having negative thoughts about that job as soon as you wake up. And when you work against desire, depression begins. Then take the anger and thoughts from that job to some other job or family members. And then it grows slowly. you have to go to work and you start having negative thoughts about that job as soon as you wake up. And when you work against desire, depression begins. Then take the anger and thoughts from that job to some other job or family members. And then it grows slowly. you have to go to work and you start having negative thoughts about that job as soon as you wake up. And when you work against desire, depression begins. Then take the anger and thoughts from that job to some other job or family members. And then it grows slowly.

Therefore, no job is related to depression. Your idea is how your thoughts relate to depression.

When you do your favorite job, you will always be interesting for the job. You wake up in the morning and you will be excited about your work and you will feel the energy within you. then you will never get depressed about your work.

p \ Z

Facebook moderators have the highest suicide rate. Those who are not suicidal have PSTD.

Apparently watching some of the sickest and most twisted minds of people posting is not good for your mental health 7 days a week.

Not to mention being subjected to that torture every day by 28 greats a year and knowing that if they break a judgment rule on video, they will be fired.

Stress aggravated by unnecessary stress = Mass suicide rates.

“We are surrounded by more evil than you can imagine, is what a Facebook moderator said before overdosing.

The average moderator works approximately

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Facebook moderators have the highest suicide rate. Those who are not suicidal have PSTD.

Apparently watching some of the sickest and most twisted minds of people posting is not good for your mental health 7 days a week.

Not to mention being subjected to that torture every day by 28 greats a year and knowing that if they break a judgment rule on video, they will be fired.

Stress aggravated by unnecessary stress = Mass suicide rates.

“We are surrounded by more evil than you can imagine, is what a Facebook moderator said before overdosing.

The average moderator works for about 3 months before being replaced by a new one. Once they are let go or fired, it's like they never worked there.

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