What physical activities can I do considering my current fitness level?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Aleena Cruz



What physical activities can I do considering my current fitness level?

You have a loaded answer built in to your own question.

Congratulations!!!

Come as you are and start somewhere, anywhere.

The heavens have no walls.

The important thing is to get going and do something. And as you improve, do a little more and a little more …… you get the idea, here.

Simultaneously, start eating and drinking a little healthy too.

Water, water, water everywhere, but not enough in your body. Drink it.

Start a plan with specific goals and a framework. Improve and improvise when necessary.

Let me know how it goes.

I hope that helps.

The amount of exercise you need is subjective. It depends on what you want to achieve, whether it is losing weight, building muscle, increasing cardiovascular fitness, or maintaining your current weight.

It is good to exercise every day, unless you are doing a high intensity exercise (weight training or HIIT); This is when your body needs time to recover.

The World Health Organization prescribes 150 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic physical activity during the week or at least 75 minutes of vigorous intensity aerobic physical activity during the week or an equivalent combination of modality

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The amount of exercise you need is subjective. It depends on what you want to achieve, whether it is losing weight, building muscle, increasing cardiovascular fitness, or maintaining your current weight.

It is good to exercise every day, unless you are doing a high intensity exercise (weight training or HIIT); This is when your body needs time to recover.

The World Health Organization prescribes 150 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic physical activity during the week or at least 75 minutes of vigorous intensity aerobic physical activity during the week or an equivalent combination of moderate and vigorous intensity activity for a healthy life.

Here are some general guidelines

  • Your exercise goal shouldn't discourage you from being physically active during the day. Take a 5 minute break from your desk every 50 minutes. Take the stairs if you can. Park at least 20 cars further from the store. Iron for 30 seconds every day and add 5 seconds to your ironing time every ten days. Vacuum your rugs, clean your car, garden, anything that takes you away from the sofa / desk.
  • The 10,000 step rule is a popular metric. 10,000 steps add up to about 5 miles. If you can follow the steps throughout the day, you will find that this goal is difficult to achieve unless deliberately tried. Anything less than 5,000 steps is touted as an indicator of a sedentary lifestyle.
  • If you have a goal like losing weight, lowering your blood pressure, or improving your cardiovascular fitness, you need to increase the frequency of your workouts or the intensity of your exercise. For example, a standard mile of 20 minutes is considered a brisk pace and walking 3 miles in 60 minutes is considered a moderate intensity exercise. This is enough for a beginner. However, if you want to increase the intensity of your training, you should increase your pace, start with maybe 3.3 miles per hour and try to get to 4 miles per hour. The intensity of your exercise depends on your effort and not on your speed. The speed (3 mph) could actually be slow for someone else who is trained to run 4 miles per hour. Your target heart rate is generally considered a good measure of your exertion rate.
  • Research suggests that combining a strength training routine with cardiovascular training produces better results than simple cardiovascular routines. Additionally, high-intensity interval training is highly sought after, due to increased oxygen consumption after training and increased metabolism compared to steady-state cardio. That's not to say that low-intensity steady-state workouts aren't effective. LISS workouts that last between 30 and 60 minutes and maintain a maximum heart rate of 60% aid in fat loss and increase endurance.
  • The American Diabetes Association suggests not having two consecutive days without exercise. The ADA guidelines for managing diabetes describe that exercising every day helps maintain tighter blood sugar controls. Even walking 30 minutes a day brings significant improvements in diabetics. Walking sessions that fall in the 45-60 minute window have additional benefits, such as weight loss.

Walking is the easiest, cheapest exercise, and the most natural movement that the body can perform. Love yourself enough to walk. After all, we are made to walk and move, not to put down roots!

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