What moment in the office made you realize, "It's time to start looking for a new job"?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Sara Mason



What moment in the office made you realize, "It's time to start looking for a new job"?

I quit my 9-year job as a club fitness director to take a job that was a step above what I was doing and 2 miles from home. Not only would he get to be the fitness director, but he would also learn how to manage sports leagues (soccer, volleyball, basketball) to help the guy who had been there scheduling activities since the facility opened. I was part of a new management team that included myself, the director of operations, the general manager, a membership director for the new gym that opened, the court and field director, a daycare and party planner. and a financial coordinator.

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I quit my 9-year job as a club fitness director to take a job that was a step above what I was doing and 2 miles from home. Not only would he get to be the fitness director, but he would also learn how to manage sports leagues (soccer, volleyball, basketball) to help the guy who had been there scheduling activities since the facility opened. I was part of a new management team that included myself, the director of operations, the general manager, a membership director for the new gym that opened, the court and field director, a child care planner, and parties and a financial coordinator.

My boss expected me to be there some nights and weekends, which is typical for the fitness industry, and I was used to that kind of schedule.
About a month into my work, the conversations about acquiring a company that would rent us space to do children's sports leagues were increasing, and by the end of that year (I was hired in October), it was going to be a closed deal. . That was great, but I was upset that my involvement in the sports aspect of the job was limited, as we were buying the company and they would be the directors of the leagues and camps. Okay, whatever, I still have my fitness work to do, and I was also managing the service desk, a lot to do.

One day, the owner's HR person came in and everyone was furious. When he walked in, a head was going to roll. But who??? Soon, we see her call the guy in charge of scheduling the field and courts to go for a walk. It was the Monday before Thanksgiving. The next thing we see is that he collects his belongings and leaves, they had fired him because they no longer needed him. He was the longest-serving employee there and he was gone.

Soon after, my boss asked me, "How would you feel working 6 or more days a week?" Of course, it was not a question. Now, I like to work, but I also like the balance of my life outside of work. I would arrive on Saturday and Sunday mornings to check things out and leave around noon. I missed the classes I liked to go to at my Crossfit gym, and I wasn't leaving at night until after 6 or 7, I was also missing the weekdays stuff at my gym, and I missed it so much . Even after a 10 hour day, I was going to change to work out at the gym there, and I felt weird and guilty about it with my boss. They paid me, so no matter how many hours I worked, the same pay. That was the first nail in the coffin.

My best friend's mother-in-law (20 years old) passed away and I was very close to her. She was Jewish and the service was on a Sunday morning. I called my boss and told him that I was not going to be there on Sunday morning due to a funeral, that it was very early, so I left him a message. My boss not only expected me to be there every damn weekend, but I was there too.

I went to the funeral and got to work around noon. My boss was there and he was a bit distant with me, but I went to work and stayed for half a day, even after he left.

The next morning, he called me to the third floor of the facility where we had meetings, it was quiet and private. I had a disciplinary notice for me because I cancel. I told him that I would sign it, but that I was noticing that I did not agree and that I did not regret it because my friend is like a member of the family. I was 41 years old and they wrote to me for missing 1/2 day of work when I had been there the previous 6 days. That was the second nail in the coffin.

I was in charge of the front desk and we needed to hire two other part-time people to complete the schedule. I emailed HR and my boss three times and got no response. I spent a lot of time at the front desk, a VERY well paid receptionist. Finally, I went to see my boss when he was writing the schedule and told him that I needed people, that the schedule had several gaps that could not be filled. His response: "We are looking to fill it with existing staff." That was it. Final nail. My answer to him, as he closed the door of his office; "Who we are?" I write the reception hours, it should be part of "us". I don't remember your answer but it was weak enough that my next statement was the statement of my voluntary resignation within a week. I hated that job enough that I didn't mind not having a vine to swing on, and I wasn't going to stay 2 more weeks. My husband was fine with my decision, he saw how miserable I was working so hard and was fine with staying afloat until I found a new job. That was before Valentine's Day. I received the courtesy of an exit interview, and I was honest about the demands made on me and the disappointment that the job I was hired for changed right after I started. My husband was fine with my decision, he saw how miserable I was working so hard and was fine with staying afloat until I found a new job. That was before Valentine's Day. I received the courtesy of an exit interview, and I was honest about the demands made on me and the disappointment that the job I was hired for changed right after I started. My husband was fine with my decision, he saw how miserable I was working so hard and was fine with staying afloat until I found a new job. That was before Valentine's Day. I received the courtesy of an exit interview, and I was honest about the demands made on me and the disappointment that the job I was hired for changed right after I started.

Five days after I left, the general manager was fired. A few weeks later, the accountant was fired. The membership manager was moved to be a front desk worker. The girl in charge of the nursery and the parties quit. In May, the owners decided to close the gym and rented it out to a dance studio. I haven't been back since.

Now I work for my husband's electrical contracting business and have got my life back. I train 6 classes in my Crossfit gym every week, I exercise any day I want and I work from home with my dog.

In fact, I don't work in an office; I clean them.

I have been in a toxic relationship with a new supervisor for about three weeks.

Examples of this are: my boss ignores me by pretending not to listen to my questions. In buildings that she had never cleaned before, she offered absolutely no help or direction. He wouldn't tell me where supplies were kept and then scold me for taking too long on a task.

There was also incessant criticism:

no, don't hold the mop like this; No, don't load the cube like this; No, don't put the mop there.

I've been doing cleaning work for 2 years and she acts like

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In fact, I don't work in an office; I clean them.

I have been in a toxic relationship with a new supervisor for about three weeks.

Examples of this are: my boss ignores me by pretending not to listen to my questions. In buildings that she had never cleaned before, she offered absolutely no help or direction. He wouldn't tell me where supplies were kept and then scold me for taking too long on a task.

There was also incessant criticism:

no, don't hold the mop like this; No, don't load the cube like this; No, don't put the mop there.

I've been doing cleaning work for 2 years and she acts like she's never held a mop or broom before.

Why haven't you finished yet?

OR:

You go too fast and you miss a lot of details.

In those three weeks, I was naively busting my ass thinking that top management would find out about my work ethic, my attention to detail, resourcefulness, and ability to multitask.

Top management, the people who decided if I would get more work hours based on my job performance, never got a good evaluation from my supervisor. Even though I was worth two of his favorite pot smokers, he didn't like me.

This is a lesson that I never seem to have learned in life. Having your boss like you always trumps performance and ability.

A little kiss on the butt is very, very long. But I could never do it. I was always bad at it. I've always wanted to be able to pretend that I like someone I despise, be cunning and manipulative, but my eyes always give me away.

He didn't like that look in my eyes that told him I didn't like him shouting orders at me and talking to me like I was six years old.

The nature of my work, which many would find degrading, didn't bother me, but the unnecessary harassment was starting to get to me.

I wasn't allowed to clean the toilets with rubber gloves because she wouldn't let me go to the truck to get them, but she made sure her favorite little flying worker monkeys had them.

Before long, she turned the other employees against me because I finally confronted her about a problem.

He did not like this challenge to his authority, and immediately began to paint me as the rebellious employee. I started getting hostile looks and lack of cooperation from them.

I was excluded. Isolated where I became an easier target.

But the moment when I realized I had to find a new job came last night. I was new and given the hardest task, and everyone else was about to finish. She started harassing me for not finishing instead of sending someone to help me.

Then it happened. Which I fear because it has gotten me in trouble all my life. I opened my mouth and the words came out of me. Angry and scathing words directed at my former supervisor.

I call his former supervisor because, although I am technically still employed by this company, I gave him my two weeks notice.

It was okay because during my exit interview, I was told that my supervisor took a photo of a lunch table in the cafeteria that had potato chip crumbs on it.

My work had been sabotaged by her in an attempt to get me fired. I left that dining room spotlessly clean and I knew it.

But when a supervisor and a subordinate clash, it is the supervisor who usually prevails.

I told the owners of the company when they hired me that I would not leave them in a lurch. I usually work a few years at a job so it's embarrassing that I barely did it for three weeks.

I needed this job. It took me a long time to find work. However, I know that it is a situation in which I do not come out. That supervisor didn't like me and she was going to make my life miserable until I quit or set myself up again and got fired.

I thought to myself at one point, hold on to this job. Don't let this person push you. But in no way could he have kept this job and also retained a shred of dignity.

I don't understand people like her. He was a good, hard-working and reliable person.

I tried to be nice to her, I really did. Even after realizing that I didn't care as a person, I tried to be nice. This just seems like an invitation for her to start treating me like shit again.

I've been to hell working with her, and the minute I step off the clock and don't have to speak or even look at her, it's the best feeling of the day.

I am 55 years old and I have worked for many idiots. They never change; They never see anyone else's point of view. They believe they are the victims and are good at convincing others of this.

You really have to know when to pick and choose your battles.

I applied to a company that cared for people with mental and behavioral problems when I was 18 years old. You didn't need any special education and if you had a driver's license and a diploma, you would get a job. I had both and got a job.

They had a particular house that was impossible to keep staffed. Almost every week someone asked to be transferred to another group home. I once saw a woman move into a house about an hour and a half from her, which added two hours to her daily commute, simply because she did not want to work in this specific house. They started everyone in this house going

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I applied to a company that cared for people with mental and behavioral problems when I was 18 years old. You didn't need any special education and if you had a driver's license and a diploma, you would get a job. I had both and got a job.

They had a particular house that was impossible to keep staffed. Almost every week someone asked to be transferred to another group home. I once saw a woman move into a house about an hour and a half from her, which added two hours to her daily commute, simply because she did not want to work in this specific house. They started everyone in this house because if you could hack it there, that's where they were holding you. I worked there for almost three years.

During that time I completely lost faith in the way the state runs its facilities and cares for the disabled. These young women were allowed to act however they wanted and we practically had to allow it just to avoid making waves. The house he worked in was a two-bedroom house and housed two women at a time. One girl (we'll call her Tee) was there the whole time I worked for the company, but she was constantly looking for new roommates because she was forcing them to move out.

When I started at home, Tee weighed at least 350 pounds. We were concerned for her health because she was a girl and there was no need for her to be allowed to live like this. It was our responsibility to help her, but whenever we brought it up during staff meetings, we were told to allow it. When I left the company, I weighed over 450 pounds. I honestly think they wanted me to keep gaining weight so that I would become less mobile and more manageable.

This girl would attack her roommates and staff without repercussions. If he didn't like someone, he attacked them, they quit or moved to a different house and he was happy that he got what he wanted. This comes from years ago. We were told to use MANDT handles, but it is almost impossible for an eighteen-year-old girl who weighs 120 pounds to hold a girl who weighs 400 pounds and has abnormal strength.

I know many of you might be thinking that she didn't know any better, but you would be wrong. He was there more for behavioral problems than for mental illness and was not diagnosed with any serious disabilities. He had mild fetal alcohol syndrome, but was extremely high-functioning and highly intelligent. She was more than capable of distinguishing right from wrong. When he wanted something, he could spend weeks showing his best behavior and only used his behaviors to intimidate people and get what he wanted.

Because we were understaffed, there were many nights that I ended up working well past 10pm when I was supposed to be out, but I couldn't claim it because I had already worked 16 hours that day. When I started they were unstaffed overnight, which meant they didn't pay anyone after 10pm, but the residents slept there. When I lived in live, I ended up awake in the middle of the night just because I was afraid to go to sleep because she threatened to hurt me or her roommate, and I was not paid for it, but was expected to. Get up from 6 am to 10 pm the next day. There were times when I would work my three days live with only a couple of hours of sleep.

Finally, we got approval for an awake overnight staff simply because we all threatened to quit because we were physically unable to work the hours we were working.

There was an incident that really made me decide that I had to go. The young staff member on duty that day had taken it upon herself to help the girl diet. This went well for about a week until Tee lost all interest in counting calories and eating fruit. Still, the young staff pushed her to keep trying. It resulted in many power struggles and everything came to a head one night.

The young staff was gently persuading her to stick with their diet when Tee began to savagely stab the young staff with a fork. When something like this happened we were told to lock ourselves in the staff dormitory / office but it was a cheaply made double width trailer and Tee smashed into the closed door like it was made of styrofoam. That poor staff member was chased around the house and down the street. The police came and calmed the situation. Tee got the sandwich he wanted and someone else came to work. The young staff member? She was reprimanded for "creating the situation" because she shouldn't have pushed the diet. This girl went through something traumatic and was yelled at as a result. He resigned on the spot.

Most people would be charged with assault or even attempted murder (when you're chasing someone down the street yelling "I'm going to catch you and kill you bitch," they'll probably charge you with attempted murder), but she was reassured. and he went to live his life as if nothing had happened. There were no consequences for his behavior because people just assumed they couldn't help it or that they didn't know any better. He was raised in a system that created this monster by telling him that basically doing whatever he wanted because he was untouchable, above the law, or not worth it.

I left shortly after. I would have left years earlier, but I had grown to care about the girls I worked with and really thought that I could make a difference in their lives if I showed them that I cared enough to stay. At the end of the day, it was all a huge waste of time and energy because my hands were tied too tightly to make a difference. I was a poorly paid babysitter and it's sad that these people who are being cared for deserve more. They deserve better. They need better, but they will never get the attention they need when they are taught that to get what they want they just need to launch an attack and stab some people ...

Thanks for the A2A Sean Kernan

"You ruined Aaron, and you're going to fix it."

Ok, they didn't actually say that, but they might as well have.

He had been working diligently for some time as a project manager. I had just had a harrowing near miss with a great job, one that unfortunately I had to contravene a direct order from our vice president to resolve a problem. But I solved the problem at that job and finally got approval for the 2 days of vacation that I had been asking for for months to spend time working at my house.

The first day of vacation I heard a problem was brewing at a different job and b

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Thanks for the A2A Sean Kernan

"You ruined Aaron, and you're going to fix it."

Ok, they didn't actually say that, but they might as well have.

He had been working diligently for some time as a project manager. I had just had a harrowing near miss with a great job, one that unfortunately I had to contravene a direct order from our vice president to resolve a problem. But I solved the problem at that job and finally got approval for the 2 days of vacation that I had been asking for for months to spend time working at my house.

On the first day of vacation I heard that trouble was brewing at a different job and at the end of the day they told me they would cancel my second day of vacation and that I had to come.

When I entered I found out what had happened. My company, working for a mine, was commissioned to design two large water treatment mechanisms for a mine, something that was our bread and butter, but they also wanted specialized geodesic roofs to cover them. They were huge 140 ′ diameter ceilings and they had to cover our equipment, which presented some challenges.

We had partnered with a company in Texas to design the roof. The end customer would do all the installations. They asked if my supplier was interested in installing the roof they designed. They were and my company was not interested in being a broker, so I put them in touch. But I made it very clear that any discussion of the roof supply schedule had to include me, as that was my contract.

In addition, we develop a schedule based on what the client told us. He had it set in stone and everyone had approved of it.

They called me because my supplier had just swapped PMs for a new inexperienced PM who had promised my clients supply dates ahead of our hours. Months before. And now their dates were slipping. When my client saw them slip, they complained to their management, who called my management about why my appointments were not kept. My boss, thinking he had made a mistake, had promised the client that he would personally go to Texas and "speed up" the supplier until they shipped the promise. Did this on my vacation day.

When I arrived the next day, they told me that I would go to Texas and live there to do it. My wife had 9 month old twins and a 4 year old daughter. I had things I needed to do and now I am leaving for an indefinite time.

I tried to argue. I showed all the email chains where I told the customer not to discuss the supply dates, the schedule that had been approved by all parties, a lot of backups, etc. To no avail, they never lost the message "You blew it, and you're going to fix it" attitude.

So to the left. I was away for 7 weeks. We ship months. before scheduling everything due to this problem.

But that day I realized that I needed to find a new job.

I was already on the job search 5 months later, when in my annual review this job was specifically mentioned as a black mark on my record, and the result was "our vice president has told me directly that you will not receive a raise this year."

I brought up everything that had happened and again said "I did everything right and you know the client surrounded me."

My boss stopped and suddenly remembered something. “Actually, Aaron, I forgot to tell you. About 3 weeks after his stay in Texas, Rick Manning called me. "(Rick was the mine manager and was also very close to my vice president and the man who raised our scheduling issue in the first place.)" He called to apologize. "Said my boss. He continued:" Rick told me that he had gone through all the correspondence on the subject. He said that he was clearly correct, that he had programmed everything correctly, helped them find people to install and repeatedly told them not to surround him , which is exactly what his guys did. He called to thank us for jumping on the problem that was clearly caused by them and working to solve it. "

I sat there, surprised. And then it surprised more. Why didn't they tell me this when I was languishing in Texas? Why, if they told you this, were they punishing me for not getting on? Did my vice president know this had happened?

within a week of my annual review I received an offer from another company and two weeks after that I left.

But the moment I realized it was time to go was when I realized I had bosses who wouldn't back me up. and punished me anyway.

It wasn't in an office; I was the director of a prestigious and respected art gallery.

I had quit smoking long ago when the owner, a drug addict, knowing nothing, glad to slap, deficient in attention, fool who finances trust, to put it more nicely than he really deserves, blew a gasket on me replacing the carpet in a side room.

We had swamp coolers and one of them was leaking water. The carpet stain was four feet wide. For the level of our prestige, it was a real black eye for our clients and clients. We looked like pirates.

So I spent $ 500 pulling the carpet and staining the concrete underneath. He shit

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It wasn't in an office; I was the director of a prestigious and respected art gallery.

I had quit smoking long ago when the owner, a drug addict, knowing nothing, glad to slap, deficient in attention, fool who finances trust, to put it more nicely than he really deserves, blew a gasket on me replacing the carpet in a side room.

We had swamp coolers and one of them was leaking water. The carpet stain was four feet wide. For the level of our prestige, it was a real black eye for our clients and clients. We looked like pirates.

So I spent $ 500 pulling the carpet and staining the concrete underneath. He screwed up a brick because I didn't ask him about the color of the stain. I explained that I was never around to consult him and that he threw a massive tantrum.

So I was out. Sayonara, my friend, I'm going to Ireland.

The man was totally absent. I would use the business credit card to take tax-deductible trips to cities around the world. Then, after a week of partying and to justify the tax relief on his trips, he would go into a gallery for fifteen minutes.

He sent us photographs of artist artwork that none of his workers thought could be sold and that none of his employees wanted. We would tell him as much, and then as the owner he would beat us. Boxes of artwork would arrive in the next week or two and we would be expected to hang them on the wall and sell them.

Then when it wasn't selling, he blamed me for bringing in these artists without their permission and without consulting it first.

I dealt with finance, marketing, merchandising, client relations, artist relations, sales, and building improvement projects. Keep afloat the business that his parents had given him.

So things were already tense between us.

But a few months after I quit, he called me back. The woman he had left in charge couldn't handle his shit and had left just before peak season started. No one had the experience to run the gallery during peak season, and after six months of travel I was financially exhausted.

He needed me and I needed him.

But when I returned, a one-year slip and fall lawsuit was finally reaching its ugly culmination.

A walk-in had been looking across the room, not watching her walk, and had stumbled on the two stairs that led to our sunken main chamber. "I know that artist!" he had screamed as he stumbled.

I felt bad for her until she decided to sue us into oblivion for her clumsiness.

But it turned out that the climb of the stairs was not up to the code. We hadn't built the building and we were in a historic district where we couldn't make structural changes.

The lawyers were trying to set a precedent in the case so they could sue all the other galleries in the city. They argued that the goal of a gallery was to distract people from paying attention to where they step.

You could earn a hefty dollar if they could argue their case, so they attacked us harshly.

Most of the people thought it was silly. However, it turns out that the landlord had the upstairs remodeled without a permit. And during the remodel, he had removed the railings from all the stairs. So we were in deep shit.

Because our attorneys told me about the landlord, "We don't know what's wrong with him, but we know something is really wrong with that man," they asked me to make the statement. As a director, I could be appointed to register before the law.

Because I was concerned about the business and the artists whose livelihoods depended on us being excellent, I considered it.

But after I was handed a 300-page lease, a 100-page set of interrogations from the attorneys suing us, and a 10-page document detailing our corporate structure, all of which I had less than a week to memorize, I backed off on making the statement.

Let this jerk take responsibility, I thought. "For once in his life."

After refusing to make the statement, things got very tense. We were constantly on each other's throats. When his attorney started trying to force me to make the "or else" statement, I knew I didn't have much time left for work.

It was time to start posting my resume.

I started working for a small lawn care business about a year ago. It was a great job and a great opportunity. I had been working in a movie theater and enjoyed being with my coworkers a lot, I liked my bosses and the hours were decent, but I was making less than $ 200 a week.

So when the secretary position became available at the lawn care location, I jumped on it. $ 12 an hour 40 hours a week. It was an answer to prayers. I was and am really grateful for the experience I had there.

However, the company was plagued with problems: high turnover, exceptionally poor management, and poor planning. It was a company

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I started working for a small lawn care business about a year ago. It was a great job and a great opportunity. I had been working in a movie theater and enjoyed being with my coworkers a lot, I liked my bosses and the hours were decent, but I was making less than $ 200 a week.

So when the secretary position became available at the lawn care location, I jumped on it. $ 12 an hour 40 hours a week. It was an answer to prayers. I was and am really grateful for the experience I had there.

However, the company was plagued with problems: high turnover, exceptionally poor management, and poor planning. It was a company full of good people with good intentions, but the dysfunctional environment and aggravating problems made it almost a scam. Often times, people didn't get what they paid for, scheduled work had months to expire before it was canceled, hugely large overdue invoices from us to surrounding businesses, a company culture that hated the customer, and for me, I was able to Hear everyone hate you over the phone as a customer service representative.

I was the only full-time person and since the company had given me the opportunity to care for my family, I wanted to help the company succeed; I wanted to help him overcome his problems. I stayed up late; I took my lunch break to pass out flyers to find new hires when half of our workforce quit; I spent more time on homework and often did more work in the same amount of time as the other 2 secretaries put together.

However, it was too stressful. I have anxiety and depression, and some of the things people said to me on the phone were just cruel. It triggered anxiety attacks and bouts of depression that affected my life at home. I did my best to make sure people got what they wanted, but if the crews weren't doing their job, they didn't find out, I did, and there was nothing I could do but tell the crew to come back and I hope. have done a better job.

There was also very little recognition for good work. He longed for every little thank you or good job he got. I had considered leaving a couple of times. But I always stopped because I felt they needed me and, as the breadwinner for my family, I needed them.

The breaking point came after I had a miscarriage. It was very early, but it was the first time he had tested positive; the moment was perfect to tell our parents that they were having their first grandchild at Christmas. We were going to be parents! But then we weren't. I still cry thinking about that. I went to work and tried to get through the day. I needed a distraction, something else to focus on.

But then my boss texted me. I'd brought a work monitor home a couple of times for homework and stuff and didn't think much of it. He always came back the next day in the same conditions. Since this was my first office job, I didn't know about the taboo of bringing work gear home. He said that he should have asked (he should have) and that he had lost all confidence in me and that we would have to have a meeting soon to discuss the consequences. I was devastated that I had worked so hard to earn their trust and recognition. With a single mistake, everything disappeared.

In the following week I kept asking when he would like to meet so that we could deal with this consequence or at least find out what it was, but to no avail. I often didn't get a text message and my calls always went to voicemail. I just had this "consequence" floating over my head. His office was on the other side of town and I was afraid that if he saw him he would fire me on the spot. All my hard work and effort meant nothing. I was as expendable as the people who hardly ever showed up to mow the lawn.

So I looked for jobs in the city, I was interviewed and hired for my current job in less than a week. I was earning more money, working less, offering excellent medical and dental coverage, a support structure, mentors, people actively telling me that I was doing a job and that they liked having me around, and to top it off, I was in elementary school. school I attended as a child and my co-workers were people who had taught me. I was giving back to my community, I was doing something with a purpose. When I gave the lawn care company my 2 week notice, they were shocked.

It turns out that if you treat good employees like garbage, they tend to disappear.

Said the word "revisit".

I went into his office. Today would be my promotion day.

More money. Sweet.

I nailed down all the necessary goals for the raise. Although it changed the expectations for my promotion last time, this time it would be different.

He was sure of it.

My heart sank. Five minutes into the conversation, it moved my performance target one more time. Then he mumbled something about budgets.

“Matt, you are valuable to the team. I'll tell you what. Let's review this in a few months once the budget looses a bit. You know how crazy things are. "

My mouth said, "Okay." My brain sa

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Said the word "revisit".

I went into his office. Today would be my promotion day.

More money. Sweet.

I nailed down all the necessary goals for the raise. Although it changed the expectations for my promotion last time, this time it would be different.

He was sure of it.

My heart sank. Five minutes into the conversation, it moved my performance target one more time. Then he mumbled something about budgets.

“Matt, you are valuable to the team. I'll tell you what. Let's review this in a few months once the budget looses a bit. You know how crazy things are. "

My mouth said, "Okay." My brain said, "Strike two ... you're out."

His shoulders relaxed as if to say, "Oh good, he took the bait."

I went and got connected to LinkedIn. Then I went home and updated my resume.

Six weeks later I was offered three jobs. So my company made a counter offer, included a promotion, and I got a new boss.


"Revisit" is the verbal battle strategy for lazy managers and incompetent "leaders" to keep up with good employees.

To the old me, "revisiting" meant, "They've heard me. Things are crazy now. But I'm a gold star employee. Plus, they sounded pretty sincere. Once things settle down, they'll take care of me." .

To a lazy manager, "revisit" means: "I'm so smart. I found a magic word that sounds good but doesn't offer any work from me. This will shut you up for a few months. Hooray!"

To the now-smarter me, "revisit" means: "The only thing we'll revisit is this conversation when I'm forced to speak again."


You know if you are a good employee or not. If you've been busting your ass, meeting your goals, and being a good team player, then you're already in the top 10% of your peers.

Your manager will do everything possible to retain you.

Heard what happened. I've seen it happen. It happened to me.

Several years ago, I was in a struggling company. Management emailed us the bad news: an indefinite hiring freeze and no salary increase for anyone. I worked hard to help keep the lights on.

Judgment Day arrived.

It was time for my annual performance review. John, my manager, made war. He fought my battle for me. Won. A week later, he confirmed a small but significant 3% increase. Good managers know that there is always a market for the best talent.

So when it's time to talk about money and:

A) You have worked hard

B) I didn't get in trouble

C) You have played well with others

D) Cancel a dinner or two for work.

... but your boss casually mentions "revisiting" hidden inside an unconvincing sounding excuse, know this: you are being misled.

You do not believe me?

Get out of your office.

As you walk away, spin around. You'll see him dancing like Homer Simpson when he set his high school diploma on fire, singing, “I'm so smart. I am so smart. SMRT ... "

So when you see your boss dance that little jig while his office burns, here's a little magic word of your own ...

Bye.

I was hired by a life insurance company that specialized in issuing life insurance policies for those many companies that they would consider “high” risk, that is, those with chronic medical conditions like diabetes, previous heart attacks, etc. My experience in nursing was a requirement. in distinguishing which people were actually complying with medical advice and not ignoring their condition.

I was “educated” about the process by 4 life insurance “underwriters”, but I studied and passed the first 3 insurance issuance tests.

We get requests for coverage for people with all kinds of medical problems. Some people were

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I was hired by a life insurance company that specialized in issuing life insurance policies for those many companies that they would consider “high” risk, that is, those with chronic medical conditions like diabetes, previous heart attacks, etc. My experience in nursing was a requirement. in distinguishing which people were actually complying with medical advice and not ignoring their condition.

I was “educated” about the process by 4 life insurance “underwriters”, but I studied and passed the first 3 insurance issuance tests.

We get requests for coverage for people with all kinds of medical problems. Some people completely denied their condition, telling the insurance agent that they had good control of their diabetes, but that their A1C (average measurement of blood sugar levels for the last 30 days) was MORE THAN 13, 5 (a good control would have been 6 to 7.5 or 8). Some people thought they could cheat the tests and said "Yes, I quit smoking 6 months ago", but their urinalysis was positive for nicotine. Smoking results in higher premiums, plus more “tables” (additional costs without medical history) if you have already been diagnosed with COPD, emphysema, heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke, TIA, etc.

So, they paid us a salary, 37.5 hours per week required for that salary. I was "drawn" into this job, with promises of NO weekends, NO holidays, NO shift work.

Well, they had a meeting 3 times a week, which started at 7 or 7:30 a.m. M., Before the official office hours of 8 a.m. M. At 5 p. M. So, I had to be early for that. Cases were brought there for denials of coverage, or if anyone had a big question about whether they should approve it.

Then it was announced that we would work late many nights, plus noon on Saturday. I let the “guy” who interviewed me know for the position that I was NOT happy that I was LIEED. I ended up working around 50 hours a week (plus 2 hours + daily commute to work) They wanted 60!

Then one day, the CEO called a special meeting in which he requested the attendance of all the life insurance analysts. No one seemed to know what it was about. They brought in a file and literally tore it to pieces! This lasted over an hour! By the time they revealed WHO they thought made a mistake, we were all pretty convinced that it was all of us. It turns out that an analyst with years of experience had missed something. This analyst worked there at least 60 hours a week. They SURPASSED this person in front of everyone! At that moment I knew that I would NOT withdraw from this company.

Couple months later, they “counseled” me on having upset someone with something I said or did. They would not disclose the person or persons, nor exactly what I had done/said. I said I would try to not do that again, but that it would be difficult to change the behavior, since I didn’t know what behavior to change.

About 6 months later, they said that once again I had upset someone with an undisclosed event, & I was fired. it is the only time in my life that I have been fired.

I had to leave that day- they would pack my desk & send it to me.

So, I went home, & told my husband, who was very supportive. I went to local unemployment office to file for benefits (Company had said that I would NOT be able to get unemployment benefits!). I filled out the forms, listed the circumstances that resulted in my termination, listed circumstances of my “training”, etc. I got my unemployment benefits. I found a new job in about 6 weeks, doing same job I had been doing for more money. This job lasted about 8 months, then the company was moved to another state & I wasn’t willing to move, not have a 6 hour commute per day.

Local school system was looking for people to work on buses, to assist with multiple disability students. I worked this job for about a year, and really enjoyed it. Then there was an opening in one of the high schools for an instructional aide position, to work with multiple disability students. I had an excellent teacher as a trainer, and worked there for 6 years. I transferred to another school because my last year there involved providing care for a violent 16 yr old, whose mother refused to give here medication to reduce the violent acting out.

This student was not only inflicting injuries on me, but on other students & staff. After once incident, where I realized she could have killed me, or crippled me, I decided that I was out of there at the end of the year.

I ended up staying in the school system another 6 years, at different schools. Then I took early retirement.

When I started working in “Special Ed”, most of the students I worked with were cerebral palsy, Traumatic brain injury, Down’s syndrome, & other assorted syndromes that were seldom mentioned in public.

When I retired, most of the students were severe Autism, severely mentally disturbed (& desperately needs treatment, but not likely to get treatment!), Schizophrenic, etc.

For the most part, I was happy with my time there. There were some teachers who were Excellent, & 1 teacher who was a total waste of space.

I’m glad that I’m now retired. There is life after retirement.

I started working in a small marketing agency when I finished college as a copywriter. I worked as a contractor for a few months before I was promoted to part-time staff.

To say that I loved work was an understatement. I received the support of my colleagues and the CEO, they gave me autonomy on the projects that were entrusted to me and I felt that I was part of something bigger. Even better, I had amazing copywriting projects!

But there were some massive problems.

I took on the role of a part-time job with the promise that the job would turn into a full-time position in two months. That didn't happen, but my boss pro

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I started working in a small marketing agency when I finished college as a copywriter. I worked as a contractor for a few months before I was promoted to part-time staff.

To say that I loved work was an understatement. I received the support of my colleagues and the CEO, they gave me autonomy on the projects that were entrusted to me and I felt that I was part of something bigger. Even better, I had amazing copywriting projects!

But there were some massive problems.

I took on the role of part time employment with the promise the job would become a full-time position within two months. That didn't happen, but my boss promised it would. I was also paid less than minimum wage. In my role, I was not only in charge of copywriting, I did social media marketing for businesses, some graphic design, content writing, SEO and more. But I chalked it up as 'experience'. When you do a degree in the Arts, it's expected you'll have a job with terrible pay because everyone can write.

Three months down the line, my hours were slashed so I was working 20 hours a week. By that point, I hadn't been paid for five weeks because money wasn't coming through the door. Our clients were either refusing to pay up or were paying late. I was told the hours cut would only be a short term thing and would last for a month while our accountants worked hard to bring money back into the business. To be fair, everyone took a cut in their hours.

A month later, my hours were cut to 16 hours a week. My boss was still promising me full time work and I knew it wasn't going to happen. By that point, I'd been working for the business for close to eight months. I tried condensing my 16 hours into two days so I could get a second job, but my boss didn't want that. She said she preferred me to be in the studio four days a week. We closed on Thursdays so I essentially worked four hours everyday. Quite franky, it wasn't worth it, but my grit my teeth and went along with it.

When money began coming into the busienss, everyone went back to their full time hours except me. I was on still on 16 hours a week and earning less than minimum wage. I was expected to put in the same amount of work a full timer would when it came to looking after my clients.

My brain snapped in November 2018 when my CEO promised I'd have a full time job by January 2019. I was still on 16 hours a week and could barely pay my bills. The night before I had tried applying for some fast food jobs to keep myself afloat, but they weren't hiring. And at that point, I thought, fuck it I'm out of here. She was never going to keep her promise.

I went home, updated my resume and began applying for jobs. Within two weeks, I got a job as a social media officer in a well respected science organisation.

As I was leaving on my last day, my boss thanked me for my work and for growing the marketing side of her business. I had helped her retain clients, grow her data base and established her business as the go to place for anything to do with marketing…. on less than minimum wage.

Cuando hice los cálculos de cuánto había ganado en los nueve meses que trabajé para ella, mi salario total no era ni la mitad de lo que ganaba mientras trabajaba en el comercio minorista. Dejé el estudio y nunca miré atrás.

¿Qué momento en la oficina te hizo darte cuenta: "Es hora de empezar a buscar un nuevo trabajo"?

When I joined Company X, I was very impressed by the people I met and worked with. The director of our unit was in charge of Research and Development as well as Production. My boss was the head of R&D, while another man was the head of the production lab, they both reported to the manager. I thought it was a great idea, since it came from a place where the two groups were kept separate. Allowing one person to lead both groups ensured a smooth transition of information and protocols from R&D to Production. was

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What moment in the office made you realize, "It's time to start looking for a new job"?

When I joined company X, I was really impressed by the people I met and worked with. The director of our unit was in charge of Research and Development as well as Production. My boss was head of R&D while another guy was head of the Production lab - both reported to the Director. I thought this was a great idea as I had come from a place where the two groups were kept separate. Allowing one person to direct both groups insured a seamless transition of information and protocols from R&D to Production. I was really happy to be working at Company X and was soaking up information like a sponge. It was one of the best jobs I had ever had as I was learning new things all of the time from people who knew what they were doing. My colleagues were equally enthusiastic about their work and we all got along great.

Then, an executive at the company decided his pet project was the most important thing the company was working on. We all thought it was a stupid idea, but we shrugged our shoulders as his plans didn’t really impact our group all that much. Things were still going great. Then, as a way to secure his position by expanding his power base, this executive put one of his people in charge of Production. The director I was working under was put solely in charge of R&D.

What I should mention here is that the field I work in is somewhat technical and the consumables we use are fairly expensive. In other words, you have to know what you’re doing or things can go wrong very quickly - and that’s exactly what happened. The new guy who was put in charge of Production had no experience working in that kind of environment and more, he had no interest in learning . Then, in order to divest himself of the responsibility of running Production, he quickly hired someone totally unqualified for the job. I’m not being judgmental when I say that - this person had literally no experience running a Production lab like ours. Once it was clear this guy was unqualified, the people working in Production began to leave for other, better opportunities. This guy went on to hire other unqualified people and in short order, productivity went into the toilet. Given the huge amounts of money we were wasting, I was sure someone, ANYONE, in the executive suite was going to bounce this guy and offer to put the Director back in charge. They didn’t - at least not for a long time.

Cut to six months later. Everyone is wondering what in the hell happened to our Production lab. The Accounting Department is screaming bloody murder as costs per sample had skyrocketed due to poor management. The CEO of the company called our Director into his office for a meeting. “Finally!” we all thought, “our Director is going to be put back in charge of Production and set things right.” I later met with the Director for a 1:1 and asked how the meeting with the CEO went. I asked if he was going to resume control over Production.

The Director replied, “He (the CEO) did offer to give me control over Production again, but I said no. I told him that it was too late. The people who are now running Production are not the people I would have hired. In fact, were I in charge, my first order of business would be to fire the lot of them. However, I don’t want to be that person. And in any event, I had already built a great team to run Production. Why would I want to do it again for these people? No, my focus now is to make sure all of you have a job or a good reference.”

I walked out of that meeting and started looking for a new job that day. My boss, the Director, and I all have new jobs. We get together every so often to relive the glory days. I still miss working with them.

My boss came by my office and whispered, "You're fine." She wasn't trying to whisper. He just didn't have the energy to speak in his normal voice.

He had never seen her like this, knotted and on the verge of tears. Then he went back to his office and closed the door. He stayed there for a while with our senior engineer and then he left. He had survived the day's round of layoffs. Close colleagues had been cleaning their cubicles for the past few hours and then left with their boxes of personal things.

This was nothing new. We were one of those who previously flew high

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My boss came by my office and whispered, "You're fine." She wasn't trying to whisper. He just didn't have the energy to speak in his normal voice.

He had never seen her like this, knotted and on the verge of tears. Then he went back to his office and closed the door. He stayed there for a while with our senior engineer and then he left. He had survived the day's round of layoffs. Close colleagues had been cleaning their cubicles for the past few hours and then left with their boxes of personal things.

This was not a new thing. We were one of the formerly high-flying minicomputer companies, part of an industry that was clearly in decline. There had been several previous rounds over the previous five years. This round, was different, though. The cuts were deep. People who had been with my boss the whole way, making great contributions to our product, were hit this time. We lost key developers and project leaders, and we were going to have to re-think a lot of things about how we were going to move forward.

Our senior engineer got the rest of us together, and he told us what our boss had told him: She had been given the folders the night before. All the names had been chosen for her. She had no input. A committee of about a dozen senior managers, drawn from across the R&D division, had been given all the folders to put on a table and they were told “This table is the parking lot. Everyone’s on the outside. Here are the projects that are going to keep their funding. Pick N people, regardless of their current projects, and invite them back into the building.” We had been brought back in. Our friends who weren’t in the room were gone.

We also knew that our project was on the list to go forward, but with reduced scope and some big changes. We were going to get new resources from projects that had been cut, and we were going to explore some new directions in our older product set while simultaneously trying to refocus our next generation product set in order to find a way to get it to market sooner.

I went home, and I realized why I still had my job. My job on our team had been integration of our software products with the company’s other software products. Every important product in the company had to integrate with us. We had one other guy doing integration with one particular group as part of his job — he got cut, and I had all the other integration. That meant that I knew people all across R&D. I worked with their teams, got to know their products and their engineers, and helped them work with us. I coordinated with their managers, negotiated when necessary and sold them on the approaches to integration that we were taking, and the benefits it would bring for both product sets.

I was good at this, and some of those managers were on that committee. Some of them knew me by name. That’s why I was brought back, while my friends who did their jobs just as well as I did mine ended up in the parking lot. Their jobs just didn’t involve contact with the people who had made the decisions.

From then on, I knew that I wasn’t really going to be working to satisfy my boss. I was going to be working to keep my name in the minds of every other manager I dealt with. I was good at that. I was going to be safe for as long as they continued to use that system.

That didn’t sit well with me at all. The guy in the cube next to me was every bit as valuable to our product as I was, but he never got to work outside our own team so he was unknown to everyone on that committee of senior managers. I got around. I was known. There was always going to be a manager on the committee who knows me.

I decided that night that I would start looking in three months. I would let my friends who had just been laid off get a good head start, but once I saw them starting to get jobs I would start putting my resumes out on the street to see what opportunities I could find.

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