What mistakes should I avoid making when I am 30 years old?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Raul Malone



What mistakes should I avoid making when I am 30 years old?

Be twice that age: do the following

  1. find the career you love
  2. find the love of your life and stay married for the rest of your life
  3. save money like crazy now - always live below your salary
  4. make a life map one for you and one with your partner
  5. Thank everyone you love often - tell them you love them no matter the fights, etc. that happened, just send them a postcard that says I love you
  6. Remember to look back and realize where you were several years ago, and in the past year, are you getting where you want to go? So what will your memories be at 99?
  7. stay polite !!!!!!! never stop learning
  8. travel: when you are brave enough, go to a foreign country just you and the partner and in the economy
  9. live life as if it will never end and / or end tomorrow.
  10. take pictures in your head to remember what happens to you - put down the camera and use your brain.

All that insanely boring shit that everyone always tells you to do that will prevent the wear and tear on your body and soul and make you fabulously healthy when everyone else seems like five miles off the beaten track. Top of the list: develop discipline.

All of these are not "one and done". Get into a lifelong habit of healthy living practices.

Also: at 48 years old, some of these did not go well for me and now I regret it, that's why I list them because if I had to do it again, I would know better. Maybe you can benefit from my mistakes. Some did well for me, so I'm sharing the things I'm glad I did.

  1. Any
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All that insanely boring shit that everyone always tells you to do that will prevent the wear and tear on your body and soul and make you fabulously healthy when everyone else seems like five miles off the beaten track. Top of the list: develop discipline.

All of these are not "one and done". Get into a lifelong habit of healthy living practices.

Also: at 48 years old, some of these did not go well for me and now I regret it, that's why I list them because if I had to do it again, I would know better. Maybe you can benefit from my mistakes. Some did well for me, so I'm sharing the things I'm glad I did.

  1. Nothing matters more than choosing to be nice to other people - nothing matters more than the health, care, and well-being of other people. Not your beliefs, ideas, morals, ethics, religion, politics, money, fame, possessions, ambition. Any.
  2. You are a human being and therefore worthy of love, respect, compassion and consideration. The same goes for everyone else.
  3. Never, never, never, never smoke. Just don't do it. The lungs are beautiful. Your heart too
  4. Minimize alcohol consumption as much as possible. Save a lot of wear and tear on your body, your possessions, your wallet, your personal relationships, professional worries, insurance premiums, legal fees ...
  5. Do not do drugs. The physical, social, professional and legal risks are too high.
  6. Limit nights at the club. It is a low rate of return on investment.
  7. Get moisturized and wear sunscreen and sunglasses. Don't go tanning.
  8. Learn good hygiene and grooming. Read it if necessary. There are books on that.
  9. Learn table manners for the 21st century. Turn off your phone and put it away when you are socializing with people. Be where you are.
  10. To play a sport. It doesn't matter what, but play at least one long-term. Your health is your wealth.
  11. Eat good food.
  12. Take vitamins.
  13. Get enough sleep.
  14. If in doubt, drink a glass of water.
  15. Sleep on it. Also, if the brilliant idea you have at 3 in the morning is really good, it will stay in the daylight, so wait until morning.
  16. Floss every day and clean your teeth twice a year.
  17. Be gentle with your feet and knees. When they leave, they really leave.
  18. Never show up empty-handed. Voluntary. "How I can help?" should be your common phrase.
  19. Networking 1: It's not about how people can move you forward. It's about how you can connect people to each other. Instead of asking "what can this person I just met do for me?" ask, "What can I do for this person I just met?" If you listen carefully, they will tell you. If you do it enough times, you will start to be able to connect people to each other based on what you know about their common ground. Be good at introducing yourself to people.
  20. Networks 2: get your hands dirty. You will meet the most interesting people before and after the party. You'll be amazed at the company and conversation you'll find if you offer to prepare the chairs ahead of time or wash a mountain of dishes with other people afterward. Ask them how they got involved in the event and you'll have a good initial conversation.
  21. Networking 3: If you feel like you're not a good conversationalist, then be a good listener. People love to talk about themselves. If you can ask some polite questions to get them talking, listen carefully and you will begin to make connections between yourself and others. You may find that the conversation becomes easier after the ice breaks.
  22. Networking 4: It doesn't happen instantly that people know and remember you. Building relationships is a gradual process, not a one-time event. Be patient, be present, and know your surroundings.
  23. Mind your manners. Courtesy, patience, and respect help in every situation.
  24. Avoid drama magnets, users, and emotional vampires like the bloody plague.
  25. Be good at saying yes to things.
  26. Be good at saying no to things.
  27. He always tells the truth.
  28. Learn to hold your stirrups.
  29. Learn to apologize properly.
  30. Avoid debt like the bloody plague.
  31. Establish a means of supporting yourself.
  32. Get all the education you can and the best you can. Don't believe people who say college is not useful. It certainly is. You will reach the limit of your potential very quickly without credentials and certifications of some kind. It may be a college, graduate school, trade school, ROTC, or individual certification, but keep expanding and adding to your toolbox. I earned my first degree at 23, second at 34, third at 41, and my ESL certification also at 41. It is never too late to start. Play to your strengths.
  33. Get a passport and travel. Those experiences will inform your entire life.
  34. Pick your top three priorities to achieve in life. Drop one. The two that remain deserve all your time, resources, and attention.
  35. Leave the bad influences. Get away from the crab pot if you have to, even if you can only afford to get around town. Anyone who makes you feel bad for wanting to improve yourself is not your friend.
  36. Spend at least two years on your own living in a city other than where you grew up. This will shape your adult character away from the baggage and expectations of those who knew you since childhood. You will learn a wealth of information about you and who you are, and you can always go back later.
  37. You are going to experience career changes in life. That is not a good reason to avoid choosing a career now. Decide what you really want to do and prepare for it.
  38. Start saving for retirement now. Compound interest is one thing. Become financially literate.
  39. Forget about status symbols. Luxury cars, apartments, watches, shoes, clothes, etc. are money down the drain. Save money now and you can afford much better luxuries later.
  40. Get comfortable with your local library. The benefits are too many to ignore.
  41. Build a strong community so you can trust each other. Be nice to people.
  42. Learn a musical instrument.
  43. Learn a foreign language, two or three. Fluency in Spanish, Arabic, Farsi, Russian, and Chinese are highly marketable skills and will increase your earning potential.
  44. If there is a colleague who is doing better than you, try to find the mentoring potential rather than treating it as a competition.
  45. Read. Read the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. Read two good books at the same time. Ask people for recommendations. Two books I wish I had been given at 18: How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie, and The Art of Clear Thinking by Rolf Dobelli.
  46. Stop talking negatively, especially about yourself, but also about others. Avoid gossip.
  47. Learn the art of social reciprocity.
  48. Learn the art of minding your own business.
  49. It's no longer cute that "you like to go with the flow" and "don't be a great planner." In the adult world, these people are known as unreliable flakes. No matter how unattractive he makes you seem, make a habit of making plans and sticking to them. You will become more effective in your life and you will meet dynamic people.
  50. Develop courage, both moral and practical. You are no longer a child. You can no longer tap because you are afraid of conflict, relationships, authority, hospitals, new experiences, needles, doctors, bullies, unfamiliar foods, commitment, tests, failure or being teased of you. Own the fear and then move on with it.
  51. Failure, mistakes, and rejections are your teachers. They will tell you the things you need to know about yourself, as well as how to improve next time. What matters is whether we retain the lesson. Don't be afraid of failure and setbacks, as much as it sucks to live them; it is better to try and fail than never to try. We've all been there so you're not alone. And you won't finish making mistakes until you're dead. The most successful are the ones who have spent the longest time falling ... and getting back up. That part is important.
  52. DO NOT DIAGNOSE YOURSELF OR ANYONE ELSE. Let a professional tell you which disorders you have and which you don't. Do not decide for yourself or for anyone who is or is not anxious, depressed, narcissistic, bipolar, etc. That is not your decision. You do not have the experience, nor are you your own or anyone else's health care provider. People spend years claiming they have this or that disease without ever seeing a doctor or therapist. Do not do this.
  53. Take your medication. It's hard to accept the idea that your life now includes certain medications that you must take every day, but find a way to accept them if that's your situation.
  54. It is not patriotic to accuse others of being unpatriotic. It is not unpatriotic to question authority. The personal is political. Get involved in politics, because they affect you and your life, especially at the local level.
  55. Don't watch too much porn and don't use it as suggestions. That is not really sex. Read books on sexual technique.
  56. Live life in the world and not through a screen.
  57. Protect the planet. Your work.
  58. Learn to talk to people. Learn to take emotional and professional risks. Learn the realities of intimacy, emotional and physical, and practice them. It's scary, but it's not okay to be "socially awkward" in your 30s.
  59. Whether it was your reality growing up or not, abuse is unacceptable, be it verbal, emotional, or physical. Never tolerate it even a little and never dispense it, not even a little.
  60. Understand that your experience is not the whole truth. Learn to listen to someone else's experience with an open mind.
  61. Your time is precious. Don't waste it on excessive hours of hobbies, movies, television, games, or social media.
  62. Cultivate self-esteem. Learn to be proud of who you are.
  63. Cultivate generosity. Take care of your friends. Let them take care of you.
  64. Keep your word. Be where you say you will be and do what you say you will do. Honor your promises and don't say you can or will when you can't or won't.
  65. If you do fall in love with each other, don't back down just because it could jeopardize your career or "something better" might come up. Sometimes you meet a partner early. There is nothing wrong with that. Many 40-year-olds regret having walked away from that lover they met in their 20s.
  66. Learn the art of growing old together.
  67. Learn to meditate or pray, or find what centers you.
  68. Don't shape your life to please others. You are the only one who has to wake up to your choices every day.
  69. Laugh all you can.
  70. Be particular. If the answer is not yes, it is no.
  71. People generally don't change. Learn to accept that so you can decide if they should be in your life or not.
  72. Take responsibility for your words and deeds.
  73. Make peace with the bad things that happened in your life before. Hire a therapist if necessary. There is no shame in having an emotional baggage, but if you don't handle it yourself, you will limit it and create problems for you until you've unpacked it.
  74. Develop goals. It is okay if in pursuit of those goals, they change or change. But have a direction in life.
  75. Learn the difference between wanting and needing. You need less than you think.
  76. Learn to trust your instincts. It will absolutely save you trouble. It is better to look or feel foolish than to be in danger, and it can happen that way. Everything is fine until it is not.
  77. Learn to cook at least three dishes in addition to spaghetti.
  78. Learn to keep a clean home. Not just neat - really clean. Google "professional house cleaning methods". Don't expect someone else to take care of your slack and don't expect your girlfriend or wife to do it for you. If you are married, you are a team and that includes housework.
  79. Learn the art of compromise. Sometimes it is not weak to meet others halfway. Each one renounces something, each one gets something. Nevertheless. Compromises that affect your integrity or well-being are not worth the price.
  80. Make passion, interest, and curiosity your keywords. Interested people are interesting. Curious people arouse other people's curiosity and have a longer life before. Passionate people inspire passion.
  81. Compassion. It costs nothing. Sprinkle that shit like it's confetti.

I turned 30 in December 2018 and I am not going to say these are "mistakes" because I learned how to be a better person from them, but I will list them anyway. You take it for what it is:

  1. Do not take vacations between the ages of 14 and 29.
    I didn't grow up with much. Nothing really. I grew up with my grandmother and I bless her soul for raising me alone. So I had to quickly become self-sufficient. As such, I didn't take a vacation until I was 29. I worked many different jobs, went to school, and am now a freelance marketing architect and dance artist with people I love to work with. . My firs
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I turned 30 in December 2018 and I am not going to say these are "mistakes" because I learned how to be a better person from them, but I will list them anyway. You take it for what it is:

  1. Do not take vacations between the ages of 14 and 29.
    I didn't grow up with much. Nothing really. I grew up with my grandmother and I bless her soul for raising me alone. So I had to quickly become self-sufficient. As such, I didn't take a vacation until I was 29. I worked many different jobs, went to school, and am now a freelance marketing architect and dance artist with people I love to work with. . My first vacation was in Puerto Vallarta because one of my clients offered his place to the contractors, so I decided to get out of my comfort zone and finally take it. It was scary and uncomfortable but in the end I loved it. Looking back, I wish I had taken more vacations to remote and cultural destinations. This is my big goal in my 30s.
  2. Not learning to say 'No' to more people before.
    I went through a phase in my life where I tried to be extremely outgoing and wanted to meet all kinds of people. Little did I know that he didn't click with a lot of people and it was from this experience that I learned that he was more introverted than I thought. It was exhausting, but I met a lot of people. The dark side was that many people tried to take advantage of my abilities to "expose themselves" or "for free" and I accepted with the goodness of my heart. Fuck me for doing that. I wasted a lot of time trying to be the 'good boy'. But then again, I learned from it and I am very selective and I trust who I work with and who I am friends with.
  3. Ruin my finances.
    In 2015, I went through a terrible period of debt and little income from my first failed business attempt. I had carried credit card debt by the tens of thousands, I had to move in again with my grandmother (heartbreaking), collection agencies were calling me, I almost lost my house, but I managed to keep it and it kept increasing - the bills kept piling up . I got caught up in the whole "keeping up with the Joneses" facade and the man got it really bad. I have since come out of it, but now I live well below my means and have a substantial amount invested and saved because I learned from that experience. This was one of the experiences that changed my life the most.
  4. Hang out with friends who don't share the same vision.
    I truly believe that this is something that must be experienced to fully appreciate who you are. I had a lot of friends in the past and my dance career, at its peak, allowed me to be the 'popular' kid in college. More people knew me than I knew them. I am not trying to boost my ego here because I went in the opposite direction. I realized that this alone was exhausting and since I was with a group of people from very diverse backgrounds and points of view all the time, I rarely had time for myself to focus on myself. I have graduated a long time ago and life takes you in different directions and I have learned to put friends on hold. I focused on myself and here I am today, no matter what life throws at me, I'm fine being alone, in my own head, working towards my next great elevation.
  5. Suppressing my own values ​​and opinions that I know are true because I was afraid of being judged.
    This was quite recent. I just accepted that I really know what I'm doing. I am always learning. But everyone has the right to have their own opinion and that the truth is sometimes difficult, but someone has to say it. I suppressed a lot of myself in the past because I was afraid of being judged and scammed for my opinion. You know what? That's life and you have to stay true to who you are sometimes. You cannot attract everyone except those you attract who share the same values, as they will be the ones who will support you for the rest of your life. As clients, as friends, as lovers. Don't become complacent. But express your opinion if it is strong and you have confidence in it.
  6. Finally, do not learn before that there is a positive side to everything in life.
    This changed my life. We all go through life differently in different age ranges. That old adage of "everything in moderation" means more to me now than ever based on points 1-5 above. Respect everyone's values ​​and their deadlines. Everyone grows in their own way. Let them make mistakes. There really is a silver lining to everything in life and I look back and really wish I had learned this sooner. This is probably my biggest regret / mistake. I forced so much pressure on other people because I saw that they were making the same mistakes as me. But you know what, it's his life to live. Let them experience it and hopefully they will define their own silver lining.

Have goals. Do not miss this moment. But don't get too distracted. Silver lining! I'm going to watch the Silver Linings playbook now on Netflix, ha.

Enjoy life my friend, you only get one.

Marriage comes with built-in goals

Home

The couch

The first child

The second son

In approximately year seven, those boxes are checked. After wild enthusiasm, discovery and marriage, honeymoon and built-in goals. Some couples say, now what? Cheating, gambling and drinking. The average length of a marriage that ends in divorce is eight years.

Now let's get over that. I have been married for 30 years. Planning can help. Sit down with your wife and ask her what some goals should be to tackle together. For us it was a trip around the world in thirty days, the development of our son

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Marriage comes with built-in goals

Home

The couch

The first child

The second son

In approximately year seven, those boxes are checked. After wild enthusiasm, discovery and marriage, honeymoon and built-in goals. Some couples say, now what? Cheating, gambling and drinking. The average length of a marriage that ends in divorce is eight years.

Now let's get over that. I have been married for 30 years. Planning can help. Sit down with your wife and ask her what some goals should be to tackle together. For us it was a trip around the world in thirty days, the development of our children (offering us private schools, the best BD parties ever). We had a job change that took us to another region of the country where we really trust each other, the escape back to our hometown, four refinances, continuous travel together with the whole family (Alaska cruise, London / Paris, Riviera Maya, dozens of camping trips, we have a trailer.)

The point is, we never had a dull moment, always going up the hill together. We had things we wanted to achieve, we both wanted.

Keep your passion for each other, after 30 years I love to hug.

It is not the infatuation or the joy of discovery, it is the silent knowledge that you accept the other person and that they complete each other.

After three years of work, my friend at work told me that he had saved $ 20,000. He told me that it automatically goes to his savings from his paycheck. I looked at my statements and there were hundreds of dollars unaccounted for last month, undoubtedly spent on "women, wine, and songs." I started doing what he was doing. Save when you're young to get the benefit of compounding.

https://www.fool.com/knowledge-center/compound-interest.aspx

I've always had a fund called Fu * k you Fund where I could leave one company if I wanted to and go to another.

Keep a budget, lots of templates online. Know your expenses.

Have 6 months of expenses saved and don't break the glass unless it's an emergency.

Develop a written financial plan.

Save, save, save.

Live below your means.

Discard the credit.

Invest in ways that work for you.

Get professional advice.

Get a 15-year, not 30-year mortgage

Don't miss out on being a parent

All material objects fade and rust, no matter how they shine.

You don't need money to be happy forever. Success is not getting what you want, it is being happy with what you have. I will say that money buys security. Find out what your monthly expenses really are and multiply them by your life expectancy online, which is a total that you will need for the rest of your life. It doesn't have to be enough. There are some expensive items as you get older. Children's education, health insurance, and long-term disability care when in a nursing home.

Remember this-

You will run out of time before you run out of money.

Good luck.

For professionals like you, the first big mistake is buying a home. The bank, not you, invests your down payment of 20% plus hundreds of thousands of shares. You get ZERO interest for the life of your loan. In addition, the average accumulation of homes (3.8% last year) is 1/3 of the market. What 50% did in the last two years or 10-12% during the last 35 years.

New luxury cars come second. 30 years ago in Germany, I noticed that everyone was buying a new Mercedes. At 250,000 miles they dropped a new engine and carried on. For the past 10 years, cars in America have earned 250,000 miles, so why not buy a 10-year-old Lexus and do the same?

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For professionals like you, the first big mistake is buying a home. The bank, not you, invests your down payment of 20% plus hundreds of thousands of shares. You get ZERO interest for the life of your loan. In addition, the average accumulation of homes (3.8% last year) is 1/3 of the market. What 50% did in the last two years or 10-12% during the last 35 years.

New luxury cars come second. 30 years ago in Germany, I noticed that everyone was buying a new Mercedes. At 250,000 miles they dropped a new engine and carried on. For the past 10 years, cars in America have earned 250,000 miles, so why not buy a 10-year-old Lexus and do the same?

The third is again against the banks. All of their products are terrible. For example, a survey showed that Americans held an average of 45,000 in checking, money market, and CD accounts. If, instead, you use your broker's checking account, for example Etrade, you keep your money in the market with a return of 30 times during your life and you did not save a penny. You just kept your "float" working for you. My wife set up our credit cards to pay on the same day as the mortgage on our motorhome. Ergo, we get 1 free month of "float" from our "responsibly" used credit cards plus 2 days before the expiration date that she collects the market funds that are immediately transferred to her bank. As a precaution, we run a small margin account on the checking account. But even at 10%, the market outperforms it.

Just skip the Amazon checkout clutter and skip the memberships and shiny items.

Oh, and buy your wife flowers at unexpected times and say “you're right” often.

Divorce is actually the biggest mistake I see young professionals make. 50% off the top of your finances. Oh.

1 Unfortunately, you will receive a response from a 23 year old who is completely dependent on capital for his investments and I will explain himself why.

I'll draw quick points for your reference as I know it's not very free so let's get started:

  • I was paying a rent of 10,000 rs (double shared) per month in an extra luxurious and luxurious apartment with a salary of 30,000. I corrected myself with the rule of 70–20–10 and I am paying only 7000 of rent with a salary of 44,000 Attachment a photo for your reference. So not living frugally was my first mistake in life.
  • I chose a background w
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Footnotes

1 Abhishek Singh's answer to How can you retire at 40?

1 Unfortunately, you will receive a response from a 23 year old who is completely dependent on capital for his investments and I will explain himself why.

I'll draw quick points for your reference as I know it's not very free so let's get started:

  • I was paying a rent of 10,000 rs (double shared) per month in an extra luxurious and luxurious apartment with a salary of 30,000. I corrected myself with the rule of 70–20–10 and I am paying only 7000 of rent with a salary of 44,000 Attachment a photo for your reference. So not living frugally was my first mistake in life.
  • I chose a fund without any prior knowledge and asked my parents to invest in it, SBI Healthcare Opportunities. Just because one of my relatives suggested it. I am in losses right now and have invested 5 years ago! So not doing your research before investing in a long-term project is another mistake.
  • I started trading a get rich quick means and lost almost 45,000 in a 2 month time frame. Then I chose the correct learning approach (technical trading, 2 percent risk management, and paper trading) in exactly the order mentioned. I attached a picture but deleted some unwanted stuff. So trying to get rich quick was my other mistake.

These were my first-hand mistakes even though my mentor told me to stop choosing these ways. Therefore, "Always choose a wise and intelligent mentor who can guide you on your path to getting rich."

Conditions present after learning those things:

  • I moved a bit far from my office and I usually work from home so it is cheaper as it is semi furnished and not fully furnished. Savings 3000 monthly rent.
  • I continue to invest in this fund because I am attached to it being my first investment, not recommended.
  • I quit intraday trading and learned the long-term path, which includes dividend income along with multibagger stocks.

Suggested posts:

  1. Abhishek Singh's answer to Where and how do you spend your monthly salary?
  2. Abhishek Singh's answer to Can you share your portfolio of stocks, if you are a long-term investor?

I hope I have helped you in one way or another and provided you with some kind of value. Keep pushing yourself and making your parents proud.

Thanks !

Footnotes

1 Abhishek Singh's answer to How can you retire at 40?

Hey,

Six money mistakes to avoid at 30.

  1. Not saving enough. At 20 you may not have saved, but if you don't save at 30, my friend, you are going to make the biggest mistake of your life.
  2. Not buying a house, buying an expensive house is a trap, but not buying a house at a reasonable price in your 30s will be a big mistake.
  3. Without thinking about passive income or multiple sources of income, since you are paid high and you do not need to earn more, jobs are jobs, you may get fired or your skills will become obsolete in a couple of years! So what?

An additional one!

  • Have more th
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Hey,

Six money mistakes to avoid at 30.

  1. Not saving enough. At 20 you may not have saved, but if you don't save at 30, my friend, you are going to make the biggest mistake of your life.
  2. Not buying a house, buying an expensive house is a trap, but not buying a house at a reasonable price in your 30s will be a big mistake.
  3. Without thinking about passive income or multiple sources of income, since you are paid high and you do not need to earn more, jobs are jobs, you may get fired or your skills will become obsolete in a couple of years! So what?

An additional one!

  • Having more than 20% debt on your annual income will cost you between 40 and 50 years. At 40, I think everyone should be debt free or at least try.

What not to do is probably more instructive / constructive than anything I can tell you. Things like getting into one of the best colleges, getting perfect grades, and attending one of the best career schools are much easier said than done, and 95% of those kids don't need to ask the question in question. Similarly, most of the opportunities you missed in your 20s will tend to be lost more acutely in your 40s and older (such as startup investments and retirement portfolios, etc.). In this regard, consider buying / consuming less "stuff" and putting some of these resources to work for you. Also, your 2

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What not to do is probably more instructive / constructive than anything I can tell you. Things like getting into one of the best colleges, getting perfect grades, and attending one of the best career schools are much easier said than done, and 95% of those kids don't need to ask the question in question. Similarly, most of the opportunities you missed in your 20s will tend to be lost more acutely in your 40s and older (such as startup investments and retirement portfolios, etc.). In this regard, consider buying / consuming less "stuff" and putting some of these resources to work for you. In addition, your 20s are also a good time to develop the vital life skill of learning to say "no" to your friends and family (often "idiots").

So back to the "don'ts," for now considering avoiding things like smoking, MIP / DUI, and various other addictions might be a good place to start. Similarly, sexually transmitted diseases, traffic tickets, failed marriages, arrests, religious misadventures, crazy debts, involuntary parenthood, etc. they can create a baggage that you might later regret. Having said that, if you meet "the one" try to do your best. I have known many elders who carry to the grave the repentance of the "one who got away." Imagination can be a powerful adversary. The guys who then couldn't get away fast enough from the harsh reality of living with their "one and only"

Avoid these mistakes and you will be ahead of the game.

  1. Marry young. At 20 years old, you hardly know yourself, your partner hardly knows himself. Take the time to find out for yourself, even a small amount, before starting a marriage for life.
  2. Buy a house. Once you buy a home, you are trapped in the standard way of life. Do not travel. Motionless. It is restricted to weekends. You must work to pay for your house. Be prepared to work a lot if you want a house.
  3. Buy a new car. New cars are automatic garbage disposals for money. They immediately lose value when you remove them from the lot. They will do it
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Avoid these mistakes and you will be ahead of the game.

  1. Marry young. At 20 years old, you hardly know yourself, your partner hardly knows himself. Take the time to find out for yourself, even a small amount, before starting a marriage for life.
  2. Buy a house. Once you buy a home, you are trapped in the standard way of life. Do not travel. Motionless. It is restricted to weekends. You must work to pay for your house. Be prepared to work a lot if you want a house.
  3. Buy a new car. New cars are automatic garbage disposals for money. They immediately lose value when you remove them from the lot. They will be worth significantly less the following year. The novelty wears off quickly.
  4. Have a young child. Going back to point 1. If you barely know yourself, and your partner barely knows himself, most of the time it is a recipe for divorce and a bad education for the child.
  5. Not working hard enough. This is the time when you have to set yourself up for future success. Crush. Learn. To write. Read. All of those things will have a compounding effect in your 30s and will almost certainly increase your income.
  6. Not eating healthy. Educate yourself. Junk food and fizzy drinks will lead to an untimely grave.
  7. Do not exercise. Exercise leads to better health, leads to looking good, leads to being recognized as disciplined, leads to a great choice of colleagues, leads to a greater likelihood of promotion at work.
  8. Not reading. No, you won't get infinitely smarter overnight. Yes, you will get infinitely smarter over the next 2 years. Keep reading.
  9. Not saving and investing. Learn to save. Set aside a percentage of your salary for each payment. When you get the hang of it, buy stocks in an index fund with every starter pay. For more advanced investors, invest in whatever you want and diversify.

I believed the story told on the HBO show "Sex and The City," in which Miranda, the successful city girl, buys her own house and then, of course, gets engaged. Murphy's Law, he called it.

I thought ... No! I BELIEVED: buy-home = happily ever after. And that was just one, among many other stories like that ... He was a fan of lies. God bless me.

Here are two major mistakes

1) Three shitty stories that society will convince you to believe, for example:

a- You need a university degree ...

I have one. I went to school at night when I was in my early thirties. I was completely exhausted, I ignored my yoga.

T

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I believed the story told on the HBO show "Sex and The City," in which Miranda, the successful city girl, buys her own house and then, of course, gets engaged. Murphy's Law, he called it.

I thought ... No! I BELIEVED: buy-home = happily ever after. And that was just one, among many other stories like that ... He was a fan of lies. God bless me.

Here are two major mistakes

1) Three shitty stories that society will convince you to believe, for example:

a- You need a university degree ...

I have one. I went to school at night when I was in my early thirties. I was completely exhausted, I ignored my yoga.

The day I graduated I went to see my boss. I SAID I WANTED A RAISE, I NOW HAD A COLLEGE DEGREE! She laughed at me. Literally.

b.- You must own a house

Little did I know that I did not own a house, I OWNED the house. The bank to be more precise, which meant being more and more attached to work that I no longer liked.

c- You must invest in 401 K

Every Merryl Lynch, et all that came to our offices showed us charts of what would happen to our 401K, they all said that, on average, we would get an 8 percent return on our money. In the 10 years of adding money to my 401K I NEVER saw a return greater than 0.5 percent, NEGATIVE.

Now I'm out of work and managing my 401K portfolio. I buy companies that I follow and study. My portfolio is up MUCH more than 8% annually.

2) I chased the wrong men for the wrong reasons. I have a book coming out in a few months on that, it's too much for a Quora answer.

The common mistakes that everyone makes cannot and cannot be generalized, but recently I have seen the early 30's mistake they make is that they are too ambitious, although ambitions are not wrong, but when emotions evaporate from ambitions lose their fundamental importance. Second, what I feel is that people in their thirties are more complacent with the virtual world instead of focusing on the reality of relationships, they get carried away by the failures of life, they feel unmotivated, dejected, that I think it is the biggest mistake and flaw they are making, they just give up easily and don't try to hold on to make it work and work

Keep reading

The common mistakes that everyone makes cannot and cannot be generalized, but recently I have seen the early 30's mistake they make is that they are too ambitious, although ambitions are not wrong, but when emotions evaporate from ambitions lose their fundamental importance. Second, what I feel is that people in their thirties are more complacent with the virtual world instead of focusing on the reality of relationships, they get carried away by the failures of life, they feel unmotivated, dejected, that I think it is the biggest mistake and defect that they are making, they just give up easily and do not try to hold on to make it work and work better

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