What martial arts are really effective in a street fight and which ones are not?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Rhett Farmer



What martial arts are really effective in a street fight and which ones are not?

Answer…

NONE…

Exactly ZERO martial arts, they are effective in a "FIGHT ON THE STREET".

A street fight is a voluntary criminal act between two or more idiots, who need to have their asses locked up for a while, to impart to them, the importance of finding better ways to resolve their differences, than violence.

In PERSONAL DEFENSE… more than 90% of the situations can be PREVENTED, following “THE RULES”.

"What rules?" you ask?

  • DON'T GO TO STUPID PLACES
  • DON'T DO IN STUPID THINGS
  • DON'T date STUPID PEOPLE

People who ask "How does martial art X work in a 'street fight'?" Are usually people who do not have the f

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Answer…

NONE…

Exactly ZERO martial arts, they are effective in a "FIGHT ON THE STREET".

A street fight is a voluntary criminal act between two or more idiots, who need to have their asses locked up for a while, to impart to them, the importance of finding better ways to resolve their differences, than violence.

In PERSONAL DEFENSE… more than 90% of the situations can be PREVENTED, following “THE RULES”.

"What rules?" you ask?

  • DON'T GO TO STUPID PLACES
  • DON'T DO IN STUPID THINGS
  • DON'T date STUPID PEOPLE

People who ask “How does martial art X work in a 'street fight'?” Are usually people who don't have the faintest idea what the heck a REAL 'street fight' is ... or they are repurcussions.

They just believe in this silly BS perpetuated by martial arts and other instructors in the good name of 'marketing' ... and they fall in love, because they have been watching too many movies and TV shows, and they think what they see on a show. , this is really the "reality".

There is NO training, OF ANY KIND, to prepare you for a 'street fight' or even an emergency defense situation.

It is IMPOSSIBLE to train for every REASONABLY LIKELY situation that arises ... LEAVE ONLY every type of violent situation you may face.

What you study ... doesn't matter.
What rank you reach ... doesn't matter.
Who your instructors are ... it doesn't matter.

In a 'street fight' ... (illegal violent encounter where both people CHOOSE to fight)

The loser of the violent encounter, is almost always the person who hurts the most ... FIRST ... The one who DID the pain, usually also loses ... just in a DIFFERENT way ... (Goodbye freedom ... hello jail rock!)

In a self defense situation? (where a truly innocent person is illegally physically attacked by some criminal) The only way the innocent person wins, is if they AVOID the confrontation ... OR ... use ONLY the NECESSARY force to STOP THE THREAT from hurting them, and not one iota more than that.

You don't need a ton of training for that!

Hell… I've seen people without any formal training, they absolutely DESTROY very well-trained individuals.

My advice…

If you like getting out of jail ... and not being seen by the local police as an idiot who deserves to go to jail for a while ...

Head over to Self Defense no nonsense.

(By the way, it IS absolutely free ... and has ALL KINDS of absolutely FREE information, on how to survive real world encounters if you HAVE TO DO IT ... and A LOT of information on how to PREVENT problems in the FIRST PLACE.)

The information will not only help you stay out of jail ... but it will also prevent someone from KILLING your ass who would rather just kill you than "fight" you.

My opinion. Effective: those in which you trained with the intention of practically defending yourself (like me) or attacking others (professionals of violence and lovers of violence), and that you personally proved to be.

Not Effective - The ones you may think are effective, but have never actually tested them in the contexts that matter to you. Assume they are ineffective, for you, until proven otherwise.

My facts. I used techniques from all the martial arts and combat systems that I seriously trained in to thwart surprise attacks on the "streets" at least once (well, some of the action actually happened.

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My opinion. Effective: those in which you trained with the intention of practically defending yourself (like me) or attacking others (professionals of violence and lovers of violence), and that you personally proved to be.

Not Effective - The ones you may think are effective, but have never actually tested them in the contexts that matter to you. Assume they are ineffective, for you, until proven otherwise.

My facts. I used techniques from all martial arts and combat systems that I seriously trained in to thwart surprise attacks on the "streets" at least once (well, some of the action happened indoors). Karate, Sambo / Judo, Krav Maga and Systema.

In all cases, when I lost a fight, it was due to a masterfully executed ambush, multiple opponents (like 7 of them in 2 of us), or being unarmed against someone armed. Mastering martial arts didn't help in those situations. Obviously, not pleasant experiences, but those that taught conscience and humility.

The most "pleasant" experiences were those in which it did not reach a physical level where martial arts or combat would be useful. The most useful "martial art" in such situations turned out to be - surprise, surprise - basketball. Let me explain.

There is that concert in San Francisco, when a bully begins to follow you down the street, until you reach a corner, where another or more await you. He is quickly surrounded and has nowhere to retreat, with obvious consequences.

Of course, some people just walk behind you because they need to get to the same place you are going. However, if a guy quietly detaches himself from the shadow of a night street behind you and matches the changes in your walking pace when you try to politely shake him off your tail, he is likely to be chased.

What I found effective is this: a sudden execution of a faint and a spin, which is done in basketball to pass a defender before throwing the ball. A second ago, a creepy guy was right behind me and he was beating me. Now, I am standing six feet out of his path, ready for action, looking at both him and the street corner that I would otherwise be approaching.

In the next second I take out my cell phone. If a guy was following me without bad intentions, he would be fine with someone who needs to answer a non-urgent call. Or perhaps alarmed by the unexpected movement of a stranger. However, a typical reaction was different. The guy made a face of disappointment and unconsciously said something like what a fisherman would say whose catch had just been released.

I suppose you can practice a similar maneuver in any number of martial arts, but personally I found the basketball technique to be the fastest and most effective for me. So a basketball footwork, practiced a lot against endurance opponents in sports venues, turned out to be very useful on the street.

Similarly, they could also be techniques from any other seemingly useless sport or martial art. Sports involving explosive physical action and the skillful use of improvised weapon-like objects could be especially helpful.

One of the most effective knife defenses on the streets of Russia in the 1990s was throwing a small metal ball at the attacker's head - an accomplished baseball pitcher would be very good at that.

So, in my opinion, it is not the art per se, but the practitioner's ability to defend himself with his techniques, that counts.

I totally agree with William's answer and said so and was asked to add it as my own answer.

I've been in a LOT of fights in my youth (being a little guy with a big mouth) but the fight making this point was 3v8 (including a bar bouncer at 8. Apparently the jerk who started the fight was a friend yours.) The three of us studied at the same TKD school in Toledo but we couldn't have been more different. He weighed less than 120 pounds at the time, my sprout probably weighed 180 pounds, and his sprout (the one the jerk fought with) probably weighed 300 pounds. I can't remember if at

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I totally agree with William's answer and said so and was asked to add it as my own answer.

I've been in a LOT of fights in my youth (being a little guy with a big mouth) but the fight making this point was 3v8 (including a bar bouncer at 8. Apparently the jerk who started the fight was a friend yours.) The three of us studied at the same TKD school in Toledo but we couldn't have been more different. He weighed less than 120 pounds at the time, my sprout probably weighed 180 pounds, and his sprout (the one the jerk fought with) probably weighed 300 pounds. I can't remember if the three of us had gotten our black belts by then, but if not, we would have done so soon after.

We were in a bar in a nearby college town, and I didn't really drink, so I acted like my friends' DD, and I also didn't realize that big boys sometimes only attract trouble. My friend's friend, I'll call him Big D, he was the sweetest guy you'd ever meet and he really wouldn't hurt a fly. He'd played soccer in high school and college, and he was just one of those gentle guys. He took TKD because the friend we shared B convinced him as a way to be healthier. He talked A LOT about never wanting to wear these things.

But because Big D. was huge, he always got drunk in bars to put him to the test. Asking him to fight for his arm, trying to move him by pushing him against him ... that rude kind of thing. Big D normally took these things in a caring way, but apparently this time it got out of hand. I didn't even see how it started. I was listening to music and thinking about going out because it was so hot there, and suddenly people were clearing an area due to a fight when I saw that it was Big D and my friend, B., surrounded by a group. angry young guys, mostly in college clothes, yelling and throwing drinks and shit at them. The gorillas were there quickly and before I could get there, we were ALL rushed, pushed, taken out into the street (good gorillas).

Big D was still trying to calm people down. I saw how he received two hard blows to the face. He had kicked Big D in the head on occasion, in class while sparring, and he had never really gotten into phase. As in those moments, Big D. kept his cool and pulled away pulling B. with him, trying to convince people. I was still in the crowd behind the group approaching them, trying to reach my friends but at the same time wondering how smart THAT would be. The Bouncers were still outside yelling at us to go home or take him anywhere but in front of their house, a lot of people who had been waiting to get in were now following us all, watching, doing their typical prompting.

We got halfway down the block to the truck we were driving, but B had the keys, and he was too drunk to drive, so I made my way over to him and turned my back on idiots, something we were never trained to do. By the way, I looked for the keys, and just as B handed them to me someone grabbed me from behind and spun me around, I instinctively ducked down and struck with a quick kick aimed at the groin, but actually hit the side of one knee. And THAT my friend was pretty much the only TKQ technique I threw in this fight. The group rushed towards us, and the crowd ran after them, and I lost track, ending up on the ground for a minute being stepped on. A gorilla (my savior) appeared and stood me up. and I could see three guys on the ground spinning, the one who had kicked and two others. I had no idea how they got there, but four others were fighting Big D and B. I watched as B pulled out a guy who was trying to take him down by grabbing him around the waist. B dropped three quick elbows on the boy's head and shoulders, and that boy fell. But by that time Big D has gotten mad, one of the guys, apparently a janitor, had pulled out some pepper spray and was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointed at the guy and was yelling, "Don you don't. Fuck me. I had taken out some pepper spray and was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointed at the guy and was yelling, "Don't. Fuck me. little pepper spray and he was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointing at the guy and he was screaming, "Don't do it. Don't fuck with me." but four others were fighting Big D and B. I watched as B pulled out a guy who was trying to knock him down by grabbing him around the waist. B dropped three quick elbows on the boy's head and shoulders, and that boy fell. But by that time Big D has gotten mad, one of the guys, apparently a janitor, had pulled out some pepper spray and was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointed at the guy and was yelling, "Don you don't. Fuck me. I had taken out some pepper spray and was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointed at the guy and was yelling, "Don't. Fuck me. little pepper spray and he was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointing at the guy and he was screaming, "Don't do it. Don't fuck with me." but four others were fighting Big D and B. I watched as B pulled out a guy who was trying to knock him down by grabbing him around the waist. B dropped three quick elbows on the boy's head and shoulders, and that boy fell. But by that time Big D has gotten mad, one of the guys, apparently a janitor, had pulled out some pepper spray and was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointed at the guy and was yelling, "Don you don't. Fuck me. I had taken out some pepper spray and was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointed at the guy and was yelling, "Don't. Fuck me. little pepper spray and he was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointing at the guy and he was screaming, "Don't do it. Don't fuck with me." I watched as B pulled out a guy who was trying to knock him down by grabbing him around the waist. B dropped three quick elbows on the boy's head and shoulders, and that boy fell. But by that time Big D has gotten mad, one of the guys, apparently a janitor, had pulled out some pepper spray and was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointed at the guy and was yelling, "Don you don't. Fuck me. I had taken out some pepper spray and was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointed at the guy and was yelling, "Don't. Fuck me. little pepper spray and he was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointing at the guy and he was screaming, "Don't do it. Don't fuck with me." I watched as B pulled out a guy who was trying to knock him down by grabbing him around the waist. B dropped three quick elbows on the boy's head and shoulders, and that boy fell. But by that time Big D has gotten mad, one of the guys, apparently a janitor, had pulled out some pepper spray and was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointed at the guy and was yelling, "Don you don't. Fuck me. I had taken out some pepper spray and was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointed at the guy and was yelling, "Don't. Fuck me. little pepper spray and he was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointing at the guy and he was screaming, "Don't do it. Don't fuck with me." and that boy fell. But by that time Big D has gotten mad, one of the guys, apparently a janitor, had pulled out some pepper spray and was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointed at the guy and was yelling, "Don you don't. Fuck me. I had taken out some pepper spray and was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointed at the guy and was yelling, "Don't. Fuck me. little pepper spray and he was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointing at the guy and he was screaming, "Don't do it. Don't fuck with me." and that boy fell. But by that time Big D has gotten mad, one of the guys, apparently a janitor, had pulled out some pepper spray and was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointed at the guy and was yelling, "Don you don't. Fuck me. I had taken out some pepper spray and was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointed at the guy and was yelling, "Don't. Fuck me. little pepper spray and he was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointing at the guy and he was screaming, "Don't do it. Don't fuck with me." He had taken out some pepper spray and was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointed at the guy and was yelling, “Don't do it. Fuck me not. He had taken out some pepper spray and was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointed at the guy and was yelling, “Don't do it. Fuck me not. He had taken out some pepper spray and was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointed at the guy and was yelling, “Don't do it. Fuck me not. He had taken out some pepper spray and was pointing at Big D, and Big D. had his finger pointed at the guy and was yelling, “Don't do it. Fuck me not.

I told the doorman that he was still holding me, to tell that guy we were just trying to get in the truck to go home ... But before I could get that out, the other doorman sprayed Big D and the guys who they surrounded him. Why did he do that ...

So this was a moment when time stood still ... Big D's hands were brought to his face, one of the guys broke and ran, another threw up and fell to his knees, the third attacker, on his back al Spray, he hadn't. He pulled it out of the spray so badly, he kicked B, who grabbed his leg and lifted it, sending him to the pavement. But Big D was still like a streetlight ... with his hand covering his hands and mouth, then he lowered his hands and looked at the gorilla with pure rage, tears in his eyes, his face red as a beet (literally). And I thought Oh Shit.

He took two quick steps when the doorman tried to back off first and then started spraying again with the lost pepper can, but it was too late. Big D grabbed him by the jacket collar in one hand and slammed his fist into the guy's face one, two, a third time before the gorilla went limp. But Big D wasn't done; did not let go. Still holding the guy by the neck, with the other hand he grabbed his pants, lifted him like a rag doll above his head and took a step out into the street and threw the guy 20 feet into the oncoming traffic.

Needless to say, that was the end of the fight. The point of it is this ... Three guys, all trained martial artists, athletes, and (in my case) a state champion fighter, and when a real fight breaks out, the chaos of it, the uncontrollable circumstances, and the sheer rush of adrenaline literally puts everyone and everything at risk. Whatever the style, it really comes down to the person and their intention.

We were all used to getting hit on each other a lot, so the probability of us getting seriously hurt was low, even in a one-sided fight like this. Low but NOT zero. Because I was mostly out of the fight, I could think, consider things, and plan things, but once I got directly involved, instinct took over. We all knew about TKD, but really only B was able to use it to good effect in any kind of defensive stance. B didn't seriously hurt anyone, and he got away with just a scratch or two that he didn't even remember how he got them. We attribute it to the fate of drunkards. Big D was literally hit with bottles, pushed and beaten repeatedly, but he was the only one of us who did what we were taught, making a fight a thing of last resort. It wasn't until he was crushed that he lost his temper and then became more like a wild bear than a martial artist. After we were released by the police and had a chance to talk about it, I asked him why he didn't release those guys. Big D. just reiterated that he didn't want to use anything they taught us because he doesn't like to hurt people.

Most of the punks did not press charges, after disappearing into the crowd when police arrived and later being found by investigators. But the janitor who was thrown into Traffic and the guy I hit who needed knee surgery made Big D and my life hell for a while before lightening our wallets a bit.

Oh, and the whole thing about being a trained fighter who has more responsibility for restraint in these situations, it's really true. The police AND the judge pointed out that, in addition to being older, because we were trained, we had more responsibility in downscaling. Of course, no one could explain what it was that we were expected to do differently than what we were trying to do.

I'd like to see a martial arts expert try to answer this by naming just one particular system.

The reality is that street fights are not all the same, they do not progress the same or have the same result. Some are fights standing up, one on one / two-on-one / three or more-on-one / two-on-two / 10 against 8 ... etc. Some fights start by going straight to the ground. Some start with their feet for a while, then go to the ground. Some go to the ground, then end up back on their feet (and I challenge anyone to throw the ridiculous and unfounded fallacy of a fabricated percentage of how many fights go to the ground - - sheer nonsense

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I'd like to see a martial arts expert try to answer this by naming just one particular system.

The reality is that street fights are not all the same, they do not progress the same or have the same result. Some are fights standing up, one on one / two-on-one / three or more-on-one / two-on-two / 10 against 8 ... etc. Some fights start by going straight to the ground. Some start with their feet for a while, then go to the ground. Some go to the ground, then end up back on their feet (and I challenge anyone to throw out the ridiculous, unfounded fallacy of a fabricated percentage of how many fights go to the ground, sheer nonsense).

Fights go to the ground when the less skilled rookies don't know what they are doing, or when the experts want you to go to the ground and your opponent doesn't have the knowledge and skill to avoid it. Some fights involve weapons, and these fights will differ depending on the type of weapon (blunt instrument, knife, pistol, etc.) and the number of weapons involved.

Many real fights happen when one or more people are drunk, high, or high. Also consider the variety of settings. Some fights occur inside buildings with hard floors or on thick carpets, in a wide hallway or narrow hallway, in an open room, or in a crowded space with chairs and tables. Some fights happen outside on grass, or gravel and stones, on a sidewalk or hard pavement, on a level surface, or on a steep hill. Some fights are in hot summer, pouring rain, cold winter with slippery, icy, snow-covered surfaces, or in the dead of night. Are you alone, defending yourself, or with a girlfriend, wife, or kids? These are all factors that are often not considered or played out in a classroom training session.

There are too many variables to say that a "combat" method is close to anything except what combat practice focuses on. There are many forms of combat within each martial arts system. For example, in Taekwondo, we train in class for general practice of striking techniques, then we fight for the tournament rules, then we fight for the demonstration in front of an audience or to show skills for the test requirements, then we fight for the self defense app including hitting, throwing, knocking down and grabbing.

If the only combat you do is just grabbing, or just throwing, or just punching, or just kicking, or a combination of just a couple of those, then you're not preparing for all the possibilities that could occur in an actual fight. One or two punches or kicks could end a fight in a few seconds. A well-executed throw that hits your opponent against a hard surface might be all you need. Some grappling skills to a choke or sitting on top and hitting your attacker with your fists win the fairway on some occasions.

Since a street fight is unpredictable and can go in any direction as mentioned above, so should your training in general. However, the match is often an isolated focus session on one aspect of a potential fight. If you always go straight to the ground and fight your match, then you won't experience the reality of being hit too hard by someone who won't allow you to get that close without serious injury or death. You're just playing with one skin and ignoring a very real threat of unbridled rampant attacks with no rules.

On the contrary, if you only train standing up with punches (hand or foot: boxing, karate, taekwondo, etc.), then you will not be prepared for the possibility of a fight on the ground. You need to isolate each area and then put them together to get the final product. All martial arts systems are capable of doing that, so it is up to the instructor to provide realistic, reality-based training, including resistance to opponents and heavy padding for realistic impact. It all depends on what you do in practice and what you find in each and every fight.

100 responses to this and I probably won't say anything new. What I hope to do with my answer is to clear up a couple of things that may have been missed in the typical "MMA vs TMA" bs.

Here it goes:

A street fight is usually social violence.

This changes A LOT. A street fight is NOT a duel. It is not a combat sport (social violence). It is not something that ends when a man has shown that he is tougher.

To be clear: a "street fight" is practically survival. To "win" is to walk away vertically and mostly unscathed.

Assuming there are "no guns" in a street fight is incredibly dangerous. Sure it could start that way

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100 responses to this and I probably won't say anything new. What I hope to do with my answer is to clear up a couple of things that may have been missed in the typical "MMA vs TMA" bs.

Here it goes:

A street fight is usually social violence.

This changes A LOT. A street fight is NOT a duel. It is not a combat sport (social violence). It is not something that ends when a man has shown that he is tougher.

To be clear: a "street fight" is practically survival. To "win" is to walk away vertically and mostly unscathed.

Assuming there are "no guns" in a street fight is incredibly dangerous. Sure, it could start out that way, but when you're fighting outside of a controlled environment, even a bar fight over a girl, it's all fun and games until someone pulls out a knife, a pool cue, or a blunt object.

Semi-formal street fights are basically social violence. And illegal. "Underground fighting leagues" are popular in Hollywood, but do they really exist? I do not know. They are probably much less chaotic than the small screen suggests.

"Traditional martial arts" is a misleading label

Too many people in this thread claim that "traditional martial arts" don't work. But does BJJ get a pass? How come BJJ is NOT a "traditional" martial art? It has "jujitsu" in the title.

How come Muy Thai is not a "traditional martial art"? It has as much custom, spirituality and organization as Karate.

Why isn't BOXING a "traditional martial art"? This would be a huge surprise to a rather prolific contributor like Chris Price, who teaches a more "traditional" form of boxing.

ALL of the aforementioned fighting arts styles are "traditional" if you evaluate them with a non-ethnocentric definition. Heck, wrestling is a "traditional" martial art that dates back to the Pankraton and Ancient Egypt.

A "Street-Effective" martial art is one that fights

It is not the "style" that is effective, it is how you use it, how you train it and how much you test it against skilled opponents.

Aikido is largely ineffective because 80 years of ideologically motivated teaching techniques have turned a martial art studied by Theodore Roosevelt (Aikijujitsu) into a laughingstock. Aikido stopped growing, was taken out of the pre-war environment, and now it just doesn't have the same "special sauce" that it had when it was practiced by a group of ex-samurai fighters.

Karate was murderously effective in the 1920s (Motobu, Mas Oyama), until roughly the 1980s. He then dressed up and McDojo did, but Bas Ruten and Wonderboy's effectiveness in MMA argues that it is far from ineffective. Not to mention, there are billions of variants of karate today.

Kung Fu is also hilariously diluted. When people say "Kung Fu doesn't work", they don't realize it's like saying "fighting doesn't work", because the range of Kung Fu is huge, and according to Sturgeon's Law, people always bring out the worst Kung Fu examples. say "Kung Fu" sucks, when somewhere Kung Fu is not crap, but is battle tested and very effective.

The only reason that boxing, BJJ, Very Thai and MMA are consistently rated as "effective" is because of all the "martial arts" they are practiced by the majority of people who just want to fight. You don't have to be a good person to train in them, you don't have to learn another language or culture to practice them… (well, technically you do it with Muy Thai), you just go to a place where they fight and fight with them.

It's no coincidence that these fighting arts are also arts that you can be paid a lot of money to do. Money talks. Encourage people to improve their skill.

Many "traditional martial arts" that are considered ineffective are very effective if you train to fight.

Motobu Choki from Okinawa Karate was very effective as a fighter ... because he fought with him. Mas Oyama from Kyokushin Karate also had a reputation as a fighter. Therefore, his "traditional martial art" was indisputably effective.

The reason many "professionals" who work, ie gorillas, event security, law enforcement, etc., do not see the guys at TMA being effective with their arts is because most people who now train in the arts "no fights" are simply not fighters. Boxers, BJJ, Very Thai, Judoka… they are fighters.

Lastly, "situational awareness" trumps everything.

Professionals who have to deal with Social Violence, that is, street fights, are more defined in their profession by what does not happen. Any street fight where you don't get stabbed, or your head is broken, or a bone is broken is one you "win."

Other top respondents have noted that "whoever strikes first wins." Well, how did they hit first? Knowing when the fight started before the other.

A lesson on situational awareness is too long to write here, as there are an incredible number of things that come into play. Sun Tzu even talked about being aware of certain factors in a battlefield situation, such as uniform cleanliness and the terrain on which the battle took place.

What is ironic to me is that many people knock on the door on "Traditional Martial Arts" with certain training methods, such as courtesy, uniform cleanliness, attention to detail in Kata and other things specifically to train practitioners for knowledge of the situation.

  • Courtesy increases awareness of social norms and when a potentially violent person does not intend to follow them.
  • The order in the uniform increases the "attention to detail", a term that any military veteran knows (and probably rolls his eyes in response)
  • Kata trains body awareness and unconscious awareness of range, distance, and balance.

Mind you, to make full use of these things, you still have to fight with your art, but many of the things that combat athletes touch in TMA have a purpose.

Situational awareness is something that ALL professionals who have survived situations of Social Violence have, and the really good ones have it in abundance, to the extent that anyone who intends violence can "feel" situational awareness. If you've trained to fight, been in a fight, or grew up in a tough part of town, you know what I'm talking about. There is only this intangible awareness that someone "notices" you and the atmosphere changes.

Mastering situational awareness is not just about watching the fight coming, but about tricking your opponent into making an unbalanced attack that leaves him open for a counterattack.

The awareness of the effective situation also reads the room, detects possible weapons and allies of a belligerent person, and allows the fighter to choose the best terrain to fight, if there is no way out of the fight. Combat sports don't do that very well. Street fights are not usually one-on-one duels. There are people and things around them that interact with them.

So that's my final two cents.

Situational awareness beats everything. It allows you to get out of the situation if necessary, it allows you to choose the most favorable terrain for you if you cannot avoid the fight, it allows you to protect yourself from possible weapons or group attacks, and will often give you the opportunity to strike first or, more. ideally, to suck the other guy into a lousy first attack that you can easily counter and turn in your favor.

There is no better art. It's about how you train, how and what you learn, who you are and what kind of fight you end up in.

Is it a heads up between you and a guy, showing your friends who the rougher guy of the two of you is? No weapons and probably no one else will interfere except to remove the winner from the loser to prevent him from turning lethal? Evidence shows that being good at shooting or throwing followed by submission wrestling is a good tactic.

Is it a dust storm involving gang members or money? Bring a gun. Knife, bat, machete or pistol.

Is it a sudden assault from an ambushed predator?

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There is no better art. It's about how you train, how and what you learn, who you are and what kind of fight you end up in.

Is it a heads up between you and a guy, showing your friends who the rougher guy of the two of you is? No weapons and probably no one else will interfere except to remove the winner from the loser to prevent him from turning lethal? Evidence shows that being good at shooting or throwing followed by submission wrestling is a good tactic.

Is it a dust storm involving gang members or money? Bring a gun. Knife, bat, machete or pistol.

Is it a sudden assault from a predator ambushing after your possessions or do you just want to hurt him? Training in Krav Maga or other self-defense techniques that focus on dealing with the shock of surprise and getting out of harm's way will go a long way.

Is it a big fight at a party or outside of a bar or hangout? Something flexible that teaches you to move quickly in all directions, swerve and break free from restraints, and roll to your feet if you fall would be very helpful. Aikido or some traditional jujutsu can give you those skills.

You see, just saying "street" is too general. What street is it, who is with you and why are you there? Above all, how come you can't leave? Those are far more important questions to know the answer to than which martial art to train.

Because honestly, being really good at a martial art is very, very difficult. It takes a pretty rare personality and a dedication of years and years of blood, sweat, and tears to get to a level where you can begin to think about being safe in a fight, if you ever do. Changing parts of your personality and your life so you don't have fights is actually less work. Especially if you think that choosing the "right" martial art based on the advice of strangers on the Internet will help you at all.

For advice from someone who knows about these things, read Rory Miller's "Meditations on Violence" book. It will give you good information on how to evaluate what you want to train and what it will be useful for. He has seen more shit than most people and is generally considered legitimate in self-defense / combative circles.

Wrestling is the most effective martial art on the street and on the battlefield. It was no surprise that fighting, at least in the east, was frequently practiced in ancient armies; Japan, China, and Mongolia were known for wrestling fever.

The effectiveness of wrestling had been proven on the battlefield that from 4,000 years ago until World War II, the Korean War, there were countless examples of soldiers going into hand-to-hand combat that ended up taking each other down and then ending with a fist, helmet, knife, bite.

However, there was no record of BJJ, boxing, kickboxing that was used frequently in warfare.

A boxer is fighting

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Wrestling is the most effective martial art on the street and on the battlefield. It was no surprise that fighting, at least in the east, was frequently practiced in ancient armies; Japan, China, and Mongolia were known for wrestling fever.

The effectiveness of wrestling had been proven on the battlefield that from 4,000 years ago until World War II, the Korean War, there were countless examples of soldiers going into hand-to-hand combat that ended up taking each other down and then ending with a fist, helmet, knife, bite.

However, there was no record of BJJ, boxing, kickboxing that was used frequently in warfare.

A boxer is fighting for his fists, a kickboxer for his fists and feet, a BJJ for his twisting ability. But a fighter is fighting his opponent for the land, the ground, the road, the gravity.

As long as the soft ground in the Octagon is replaced by a road, then in the UFC 90 percent of the BJJ specialists will disappear because their nape will look like a broken watermelon.

If you are not a fighter but you come across a fighter who wants to fight you on the street, I recommend that you choose one of the three below.

1: call the police or run as fast as you can.

2 - Grab a firearm or cold steel or a stone to defend yourself.

3: kneel down to ask for forgiveness.

If you're a fighter instead, act like a coward when you hit the streets because your attacks and throws can welcome a life sentence or the death penalty.

Where is the jiujitsu / BJJ magic in the UFC when yellow is on the ground?

In a street fight, you would rather run than stay on the ground when the opponent stands up.

If not, you just need to spend your time practicing a quick kick to the groin, face, head, throat, etc.

Unless you really have a need to control the opponent with enough backups from your friends (usually for the police mission), I will not recommend that anyone use BJJ in a street fight.

I once asked this question to a guy who had worked as a doorman and security guard in South London (he was like a Guy Ritchie character). He had participated in hundreds of fights and had seen many people shot, stabbed and beaten unconscious. He was also a martial arts enthusiast.

The first point he made was that no martial art guarantees success. You could be a world boxing champion and a black belt in everything from taekwondo to BJJ, but someone's friend comes up behind you and smashes a bottle over your ear, or someone throws a sudden blow that hits you and then kicks you in. head. while you're layi

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I once asked this question to a guy who had worked as a doorman and security guard in South London (he was like a Guy Ritchie character). He had participated in hundreds of fights and had seen many people shot, stabbed and beaten unconscious. He was also a martial arts enthusiast.

The first point he made was that no martial art guarantees success. You could be a world boxing champion and a black belt in everything from taekwondo to BJJ, but someone's friend comes up behind you and smashes a bottle over your ear, or someone throws a sudden blow that hits you and then kicks you in. head. while you're lying on the floor. Remember, most fights begin with a sudden attack, a barrage of blows that knock someone down and don't recover from. In fact, you could sum up the art of street fighting in one sentence: HIT FIRST.

Anyway, he classified martial arts like this. On top he put boxing. He said kickboxers often miss their kicks and end up on the ground, or their opponent catches their foot, or there just isn't room, or time, to put those kicks into action. Boxers can take a hit and instinctively roll and slip when someone attacks them. Also, of course, they have a good guard. That means the all-important first hit often misses, or at least lands without too much impact. After boxing he put on kickboxing and muay thai. But, he said, these aren't good unless you also know how to deal and fight. Like most people, he had good things to say about BJJ and American wrestling. In his opinion, the best was boxing combined with BJJ.

As for traditional AM, it was scathing. He had seen idiots outside London nightclubs slip into their kung fu stance only to be knocked unconscious. Karate, judo, and taekwondo work, but only in certain situations. If you're fighting one-on-one and the other guy isn't particularly strong and can't land a decent punch, those AMs can help. But against someone who DOES know how to fight, or even against someone who is just big, strong and aggressive, they are useless.

Below them he put the joke MAs, like Aikido and Kung fu. I'd seen a bunch of color-belted jerks in various shitty MAs beaten senselessly by dudes without any MA training. One of the big problems with traditional MAs is the emphasis on blocking. In a real fight, the blocks are completely useless. People don't throw a single punch. They launch a barrage of quick blows.

Speed, aggression, power and, above all, surprise, that's what counts. Some people carry a great deal of anger and have often been in countless fights before. Against them, few things work. Even a good amateur boxer with a black belt in BJJ could die in a street fight. The problem with MA training is that it gives you a false sense of security. In my experience, boxers and masters experts are some of the nicest people you will ever meet. They rarely start fights and rarely intimidate people. But they DO have to overestimate their abilities.

First of all, the best thing you can do is never get into that situation. The second best option is to run, as fast as you can. If you can't escape, take the first blow and hit hard. Watch out for your ground so you don't fall over and watch out for your friends sneaking up behind you. Hit hard, loud and nasty. Punch him in the nose or throat, and as he falls backward, run. A street fight is often a scary thing to watch. And it rarely ends well. Either you will hurt yourself or you will hurt him and end up in jail.

There is an established criterion to determine the effectiveness of a martial art in a street fight. It is not always black and white, but it is a start. It is as follows:

  • The purpose: is martial art designed for combat? Some styles in Tai Chi are for health and fitness only. If the martial art you are practicing is not suitable for modern combat, it is not effective in a street fight.
  • The Realism of Training: Sometimes martial artists don't provide realistic means of self-defense. Believe it or not, but there are martial artists who claim to have the power to knock you out without touching you. Some resort
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There is an established criterion to determine the effectiveness of a martial art in a street fight. It is not always black and white, but it is a start. It is as follows:

  • The purpose: is martial art designed for combat? Some styles in Tai Chi are for health and fitness only. If the martial art you are practicing is not suitable for modern combat, it is not effective in a street fight.
  • The Realism of Training: Sometimes martial artists don't provide realistic means of self-defense. Believe it or not, but there are martial artists who claim to have the power to knock you out without touching you. Some turn to magic or things you can't prove. The only reliable way to know if martial arts are effective is through science (eg physics, physiology, human anatomy, etc.). Is the teaching of art based on facts or traditions?
  • The intensity of training: Many martial arts are not effective because they lack intensity. By this I mean that they don't train under large amounts of stress and pressure. You can do all the moves, but if you don't stress your training, you won't remember any of them in actual combat. I have seen a group of martial artists who have dedicated their entire lives to their arts, but when the stress of violence appeared, they forgot all that they had trained. Why? Under stress, you lose the ability to remember complex motor skills.

These are just some of the most essential points to evaluate the effectiveness of an art. I have seen very few martial artists meet these requirements, so I am skeptical of their effectiveness in combat. If you want to know more about which martial arts are effective and which are not, read and subscribe if you like my post:

How to learn effective self defense techniques

  1. Being muscular, fit and big is helpful
  2. Having hand-eye ordering is useful
  3. Any training that involves actual practice is helpful (sure the simple answer is here)
  4. There is another boy ...
  5. Having a clear mind is the best *
  6. only for the mature ...

One: let's be clear. A 260 pound muscular man is not likely to be subdued by a 90 pound person. Like a grizzly bear, it is not likely to be subdued by the greatest man on the planet. Weight, size and fitness are important, regardless of what the hype says.

Two: some people have the gift of hand-eye coordination. Others are not. This has a real effect.

Three - Real Martia

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  1. Being muscular, fit and big is helpful
  2. Having hand-eye ordering is useful
  3. Any training that involves actual practice is helpful (sure the simple answer is here)
  4. There is another boy ...
  5. Having a clear mind is the best *
  6. only for the mature ...

One: let's be clear. A 260 pound muscular man is not likely to be subdued by a 90 pound person. Like a grizzly bear, it is not likely to be subdued by the greatest man on the planet. Weight, size and fitness are important, regardless of what the hype says.

Two: some people have the gift of hand-eye coordination. Others are not. This has a real effect.

Three: actual martial practice is invaluable. The training is great. The actual fight is even better (see # 4).

The question focuses on this point, but it is not the dominant discriminator. Several martial arts offer skill sets and beginner training relevant to this gap. Martial arts that involve actual combat examples, actual hitting / dodging, and approach techniques are best. Brazilian jujitsu (BJJ), boxing, judo, wrestling, Krav Maga, Thai boxing, etc. are superior. These put the techniques in context.

I practice judo and boxing, and have participated in many street fights, rendering several people unconscious or incapacitated. I am biased, but not stupid or biased. Fighting techniques that focus on staying on the sidelines and participating at will / distance are unreliable in an emerging conflict. However, a person trained in actual fighting will have a great advantage over the same person with only one ego.

Four - Oh, you thought this was just an adversary? Incorrect! There were other friends… How many friends did you have?

I have a huge scar from breaking up a fight between four guys (two idiot fighters and one idiot breaker and one less idiotic breaker). Guess what? There was a third fighter. He punched me, flat in the face, just as I turned around. Fortunately (for me), I was used to it and he was smaller (not a # 1 monster). I spat blood on the ground, he turned and left. I'm 225 pounds, I'm strong, fast, I practiced and took one to the face. If that guy was a decent size and could hit, he would have been in the hospital. Happens all the time. Are you sure you want to do this? see # 5.

Five - Do you think you will get out unscathed? Do you think you have the "best" martial art? You will lose. You will be hit. You will find yourself in awkward situations, unlike James Bond. Fighting is dirty, unpleasant, and should be the last resort. NEVER comes out like a hot shot, pulling away from the raid. Bruce Lee was great, but it would have been a fool to go up against an NFL lineman with a mug.

You will be hit. You will have to deal with a (bloody nose, broken tooth, shot in the gut, etc.). If you can't deal with this adversity, never even consider a conflict, just give up and use the authorities.

* Seis: no cotizado. Nadie está leyendo ahora. Todos los jóvenes de 15 años que juegan videojuegos, pero que nunca han peleado con sus hermanos pequeños, han ignorado otras palabras. “El judo es el ganador”, “Bruce Lee apesta”… bla, bla, bla.

Avoid fighting as you can. Most are meaningless ego-arguments. However, there is no need to be a coward, or by virtue of inaction, to expose others to risk. There is also no need to fight unless absolutely critical. I avoided a drunken brawl with just a high five once. I’m sure you can too.

It depends on the fighter and the choice of martial arts. Many martial arts are dojo nowadays and don't really work beyond the classroom or competitions. While most street fights are little better than slap fights that involve a lot of hooked clothes and hair. The posture in both is common and frequent without either of them doing much. But in a direct fight between a proper street fighter (illegal pit fights do count, as well as big mosh fights) versus a traditional martial artist, one who learned to apply correctly in unbalanced environments on tough terrain in street wear, he lo more likely it is so. to

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Depends on the fighter and the choice of martial arts. Many martial arts are mcdojos nowadays not actually functional beyond the classroom or competitions. While most street fights are little better than slapping matches that involve alot of snagged clothes and hair. Posturing in both is common and frequent with neither doing much. But in an out and out fight between a proper street fighter(illegal pit fights do count, as well as large mosh brawls) vs a traditional martial artist one who learned properly applicable in imbalanced settings on hard ground in street clothes chance are it will be a pyyhric victory one way or another. Both will take severe injuries and likely one will gain an edge over the other.

In most cases a man who grew up in the streets fighting will be a match for the guy who had the cushy dojo and fair environment. I said match not beat because the question is beyond ambiguous. Street fighting is an amalgamation of dozens of techniques, tricks and moves that are effective for that person. Whereas with dojo/school trained fighters they're generally trained against an equal opponent on even ground with someone to oversee the sparring and if not an equal opponent then (s)he is told to withhold the worst of their attacks in favor of learning most street fights don't have that luxury.

The other considerations are pointed, Flashy moves like spin kicks, high kicks and club fist don't work in actual fights if the “martial artist" uses these extensively then they're likely to be brought down either by their own momentum on wet or slippery ground or have their leg grabbed and snapped at the knee or hip by a torsion grab. The same goes for exclusive high kicks they leave you vulnerable on wind up and recovery a skilled street fighter will easily dodge back or weave aside then get close using elbows, knees and fists to do a take down or let you fall and curb stomp your skull.

On a more personal note I've fought guys who claim to be red, yellow, brown (who knows what other colored) belts in atleast 7 different forms of martial arts and only 2 ever put me out of a fight one was a Boxer who took everything I had and gave out like a shotgun kick. The other was a B.J.J who managed to get a submission hold that I couldn't break. I'm not trained in any proper fashion but I am a street fighter of some skill. The only defining features a street fighter has is that we're used to rough ground(rocky, roots, concrete, cobblestone and glass) and bad odds everytime expecting knives, steels toes and dirty moves like eye gouging, groin ripping and throat slams. That's our advantage, we also know what the odds of kind terrain aren't there and can anticipate the pain of being thrown into it.

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