What makes your job the best for you?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Jamie Willis



What makes your job the best for you?

I am the community manager for Quora in Dutch.

I've been there since the beginning of Quora in Dutch, since launch, and you can't imagine how exciting and amazing this has been.

Quora is very different from all the places I have worked before (as a French woman living in the Netherlands, working for Quora meant learning new international skills), and 2.5 years after launch, I am still very excited and proud to work here. .

I work from home in the Netherlands (Quora, remote first!), And I manage the Dutch-speaking Quora community, including the islands and Flemish Belgium, and even some

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I am the community manager for Quora in Dutch.

I've been there since the beginning of Quora in Dutch, since launch, and you can't imagine how exciting and amazing this has been.

Quora is very different from all the places I have worked before (as a French woman living in the Netherlands, working for Quora meant learning new international skills), and 2.5 years after launch, I am still very excited and proud to work here. .

I work from home in the Netherlands (Quora, remote first!), And I manage the Dutch-speaking Quora community, including the islands and Flemish Belgium, and even some people in South Africa, so I'm learning Afrikaans too!

Secretly, I have a soft spot for my Belgian community, don't tell the Dutch! (Kurt, Lily, Karl ... and everyone else ...)

Do you know what is good about my work?

First of all (I know I'm totally bragging), but my community is the best of all the Quora communities (prove me wrong!):

I'm having a great time with all the people who make Quora in Dutch what it is!

Every day I read incredible things from so many different people that I would never have met in real life. I read about their passions, their knowledge, their experiences, and their opinions. And the best part is that we create a bond. We know each other, and most days “going to work” feels like meeting old friends again for me.

I know, Quora in Dutch is smaller than Quora in English, but we are doing quite well, there, on “my” Quora. (Yeah, I call it that, because it feels like it's "my" baby, a little bit).

On Quora in Dutch, I have seen people make friends, I have seen people learn from each other, I have seen people agree to disagree, I have seen people ask for help and are supported by the whole community.

In the last year, with the pandemic and the closures, I thought, we live in a country that has as much daylight as Mordor, we are locked up at home and everything is closed ... this is a bit depressing ... let's do something. " fun"!

So I started to present videos of "drinks" with my community, every 2 weeks, we are in Zoom, each time with a different topic and different people, and we discuss things and we get to know each other.

Of course I get a lot of questions about my work on Quora haha, I'm not going to lie, you guys are so curious! But I also fondly remember the times when we organized the book club call and shared our favorite books; The time we celebrated Quora NL and my birthday at the same time, Hans even picked up his guitar and played music and my community sang for me!)! And this time, we had a cooking contest and we talked about food all together, at Zoom, and it was amazing!

Sometimes I make calls to help my community learn to use Quora and Spaces, one by one, and it is also fun, to meet, talk, listen to their passions, their interests, their projects. I love finding out what gets them all up, what motivates them, what brings them to Quora.

I know, this is all virtual, but nevertheless, I feel that we have created bonds and friendships. Especially since we've been there for each other through the winter darkness and gloomy closings. We have laughed and shared a part of our lives, of who we are, together.

Don't get me wrong, I still enjoy banning all bad actors and people who don't respect others, I even developed a kind of evil laugh 😈, ​​after more than 2 years banning people who go against the rules .. Some people heard it during a video call, and it's not pretty.

I can't deny that it is quite satisfying to do that. 😌

<Yes, Captain Chaos is my frame of reference ... I'm old, what do you want?>

And that's what makes my job good for me, for me. I am an outgoing loner, I love people (from home, from my computer and mobile phone), and I love challenging my community in many ways.

“Celine, thank you for your recent call to add questions. It is a great relief to me. Joke: 'ask a question and the spirit relaxes' ".

It keeps Quora in Dutch fun, lively, active, and a safe place where we dare to be ourselves. Doe je mee?

This job is the best job I could find, where I can meet and highlight great people (and ban the bad ones 😈😈😈 ... just kidding ... a bit) and obviously I work with the best colleagues! But you already knew!

Health,

Celine

Well my answer won't be very specific, but I would say if you started loving your job it would be for the best then.

So to love your job, you have to be patient, explore things, and learn. The human tendency is to get bored easily if you do the same thing over and over again. So thinking of new things will help you keep going and avoid boredom.

These things I am always applying in my case and my work is really giving me this opportunity. That is why I love my job. :)

After my mental breakdown due to severe clinical depression, anxiety and stress, I could not, did not accept that I could not work for a living. Not working and receiving a disability made me ashamed. So after a while, I tried volunteering to put myself to the test.

First the good: a volunteer job was at the Red Cross (Edmonton, Alberta, Canada), cleaning and repairing the wheelchairs they provided. It was great. Without pressure, without much thought, they left me alone, they let me work when I could, and if the work was not done at the end of the day, their inventory was so large that it hardly mattered.

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After my mental breakdown due to severe clinical depression, anxiety and stress, I could not, did not accept that I could not work for a living. Not working and receiving a disability made me ashamed. So after a while, I tried volunteering to put myself to the test.

First the good: a volunteer job was at the Red Cross (Edmonton, Alberta, Canada), cleaning and repairing the wheelchairs they provided. It was great. Without pressure, without much thought, they left me alone, they let me work when I could, and if the work was not done at the end of the day, their inventory was so large that it hardly mattered. I finally quit because I got stressed out trying to work too hard, even though the number of hours I worked was low.

So the bad: now the subject of this answer. When I later went back to looking for volunteer work, I somehow connected to a dance company / studio / school, again in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. This was ~ 20 years ago. They needed someone to do office work with computers. He was overqualified, but happy to try to be useful. First, it was, “Hello! Here are things we need to do, can you do it in the next two weeks? "I found it easy and finished in 4 hours divided into two days. I really liked it. In fact, I asked for more because it felt almost good to be useful.

Slowly, over the next few weeks, my work was piled up. Instead of working 3-4 hours a day, I found myself working the office 6-8 hours and doing more work for them at home on my home computer for more hours than I could count. They (really just the dance owner / instructor) wanted more and more. It got to the point where you were doing as much work, probably more, than the only paid employee (secretary / personal assistant). I got burned again. I felt like shit, like I couldn't do anything. All for a volunteer job.

After quitting that volunteer job, it took me a couple of weeks to realize that I had been taken advantage of. I was so engrossed in my own misery of failure that it took me a while to realize that the work I had been doing should have been done by a paid employee, and that the owner / instructor of the Dance Company took advantage of me because she couldn't Don't afford to pay someone to do the job.

She was supposed to be a good person, she was even honored as "Woman of the Month" on an Edmonton television station news show. I didn't see any of that "good" stuff in my last few weeks volunteering for her. I didn't see her at all, and the only paid employee who should have done the job herself gave me work instructions. If me and this "honest" woman spoke when I quit smoking, it was not memorable.

After that, I didn't try to do any “regular” volunteer work again. Years later I tried to do things in my community on my own initiative. Picking up trash along a long fence where large amounts of trash were caught, in the small town I was living in at the time, was particularly unsatisfactory. It would take days for the city to collect the garbage bags, and people passing by were staring at me. In fact, one of them stopped and asked me what I had done to deserve "community service." That day I finished picking up the trash on that damn fence, but I never felt inclined to do it again. By the way, that was the only comment anyone had made to me about my voluntary garbage collection during the two summers that I did.

Difficult question to answer.

I have liked most of my jobs, and I love my current job, but I don't really make a lot of money, so technically it's not "the best".

14 years mowing the neighbors' lawn. I loved. This was before the Internet, so children's attention spans were greater. I loved doing patio designs, and just the monotonous action of pacing back and forth.

! 6 years / 0 Burger King. I requested the opening and closing shifts because it meant that I was practically alone as long as I finished all the required tasks (cleaning the parking lot, stocking the freeer, etc. Muc

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Difficult question to answer.

I have liked most of my jobs, and I love my current job, but I don't really make a lot of money, so technically it's not "the best".

14 years mowing the neighbors' lawn. I loved. This was before the Internet, so children's attention spans were greater. I loved doing patio designs, and just the monotonous action of pacing back and forth.

! 6 years / 0 Burger King. I requested the opening and closing shifts because it meant I was pretty much alone as long as I finished all the required tasks (cleaning the parking lot, storing the freeer, etc.) Much more fun than standing on the conveyor belt making burgers. Also, the open and closed team were really fun people and fewer customers meant more time to fuck around, and closing meant time to sit outside and have a few beers with the rest of the staff.

17 year old bus boy at local hotel / resort. Once again it was the staff that made it great. I had a lot of fun with them, I was among the youngest, but with so much diversity.

19y / o Some of the resort's clients liked me and invited me to be their “personal assistant” when launching their website. (This was even before the big boom. They were millionaires) They paid me more than they ever paid me just to watch movies with them or go out to eat. I went with them on a Caribbean cruise, all paid for.

I finally quit because I was uncomfortable, and many years later it was discovered that they were pedophiles, but they never tried to abuse me. When I resigned, I became their chef. They paid me less, but still a lot for the amount of time. My budget was unlimited, so I could buy the best of the best foods, the most expensive meats, etc. I only cooked, but they had a maid to clean, so I never had to wash the dishes. That was pretty cool.

20 years old They didn't like my kitchen, so I took a place as a night watchman in their office. It was probably the most expensive building in town (due to all the computer equipment - again this was before the internet boom so they had all of their servers right there on site). I basically sat there and studied Japanese because I was planning on doing it. go to Japan that year.

If I had stayed with them for another six months, I would have stock options and now I would be a millionaire (they became two very famous companies).

At age 20 I go to Japan for a work-study program. The yen was strong then, and I earned enough to go home with savings. My job was as a waiter, but it was great because of the people I worked with and also because the Japanese staff were a captive audience for me to practice my Japanese. No matter how boring it was, they couldn't escape.

21 years back in the US working in a brewery. He introduced me to real beer and a lot of great co-workers. Two of whom were professors of mine (graduate students at the university), so it was interesting to hang out with my professors after work for a beer. That bar also had monthly beer tastings, where they brought about thirty varieties of a certain type of beer: stout, Belgian, porter, ipa, etc. every month. Whoever volunteered to work in that group could also drink the tasters.

22 years A secondary job as a tutor for Japanese children who were in the area because their parents had moved to the US from Japan. I met with them every day and helped them with their homework (which was in English and they couldn't read) and they paid me a lot more than the job as a waiter at the brewery.

23 years Bartending in Japan while going to college. You can guess why it was fun.

25 years First job that I did not like. Teaching English in Japan. It sucked. I will leave it at that.

25 years Second job that I did not like, but better paid up to that point. The president of a medium-sized finance company paid me to read the Wall Street Journal and Business Week, etc., and participate in meetings with the board of directors. He was supposed to give an opinion even if he didn't even know what the hell he was talking about. The president was young and progressive, the board was an old conservative. I wanted it to change things.

26 years I joined a web development company to do marketing work. My first month was learning about html, Linux, Php and other tech stuff. I had no idea or interest in it until I started learning it. Then the chief technician resigned and the only one who knew how to do what he was doing was me, because I had been working with him. I didn't do marketing work for the company, instead I became the chief technology officer for a few years. It was great. I learned programming languages ​​and was able to control my salary as the most important employee. I liked my boss and my co-workers. I liked most of my clients. They paid me well.

But I didn't like living in the city.

At 28 I left that company and started working on a contract basis helping them transition to a new developer who can take care of my clients. I made twice as much money as I had as an employee. That was good.

At the same time, going to graduate school for a completely foreign specialty. When I returned to Japan, I took a job at a consulting company based on sustainability and environmental issues. It wasn't bad, but I didn't enjoy it. I quit after a year and followed my longtime dream.

At the age of 30, I started my own company that offers cultural and bicycle tours for foreigners (sometimes also Japanese) in Japan. I love I love I love this job. But I don't make a lot of money. My wife wants me to get a "real job" (she means English teacher, but like I said, it's the worst job I've ever had). So I can't say that my current job is the "best" job, but it is the job that I like the most. Taking people to places and meeting people they would never have met by using the guides, getting them to tell me "This was so much more than we expected",

Update: 45 and it looks like I will now become a migrant farm worker picking tomatoes and potatoes.

The coronavirus screwed me up and no one will be traveling to Japan for the foreseeable future. I have to pay the electricity bill.

Jobs are modern slavery. They pay us just enough to live and no more. They punish you if you ask for more.

We are often verbally abused at work. Sometimes (more than reported), physically abused, raped, neutered.

The government receives up to 50% of your paycheck and then 10-20% of that goes to kill people in other parts of the planet, including our own children.

We delude ourselves that our friends from work are our real friends. With our friends from work we talk about pens and cubicles. We stopped having real friends.

There is a glass ceiling. It does not matter if you are a woman or a minority or

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Jobs are modern slavery. They pay us just enough to live and no more. They punish you if you ask for more.

We are often verbally abused at work. Sometimes (more than reported), physically abused, raped, neutered.

The government receives up to 50% of your paycheck and then 10-20% of that goes to kill people in other parts of the planet, including our own children.

We delude ourselves that our friends from work are our real friends. With our friends from work we talk about pens and cubicles. We stopped having real friends.

There is a glass ceiling. It doesn't matter if you are a white male, minority or female. The glass ceiling is that you are not allowed to do more than your Master, even if he is an idiot.

From 7 to. M. A 7 p. M., Either you go to work, to work or come back from work. The times when you can be most creative are compacted trash in your cubicle.

Eat shit at work. And, what's worse, you have to shit along with your co-workers and Masters. Unless, like me, you map all the secret toilets in your local urban plague.

When you're paranoid at a job, you're probably right. THEY, in fact, are talking about you and backstabbing right now.

You realize that all the money you spent on degrees to get a job that would make you happy was completely wasted. You were scammed, but you can't let the next generation know about it, so now you become part of the perpetuation of the scam.

A trillion dollar marketing campaign forced him to buy a house he did not really want and now he will "lose a house" he never really owned if he does not bow down to the Masters every day. The words "The American Dream" were coined by Fannie Mae in a marketing campaign 40 years ago to sell mortgages to slaves.

Your spouse is tired of hearing about your job after six months. And you can't care less about hers. Ten years later you wake up with a total stranger. 40 years later you die next to one.

Your IRA was not intended to cover your retirement. He intended to take money from him every month so that he would remain chained to his cubicle. Inflation then takes 90% of your IRA.

By definition: you create more value than you earn. That margin, minus executive salaries, is called "profit." This is not an "-ism". Just a definition.

When you were a child you liked to draw, read, run, laugh, play and imagine a magical world. You will never do any of that again.

Eventually, they are all fired and replaced by younger, cheaper, and temporary versions of you. You see this but you are afraid to do something about it.

You see homeless people and you think, "there, if it weren't for the grace of God, I would go."

It's okay.

Now. What are you gonna do about it?

A few years ago, when I started my freelance career, my income for the first few months was almost nil.

On the other hand, my friends were already employed and were earning INR 20–30k per month, while the former were earning around INR 60K-80K per month.

After a month or two, I started making the same amount of money my friends were making.

Today I am at a point where some days I make in one day what my employee friends earn in a month.

Slowly and steadily, my income kept growing, because my income was not limited by someone, but my income depended on how much

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A few years ago, when I started my freelance career, my income for the first few months was almost nil.

On the other hand, my friends were already employed and were earning INR 20–30k per month, while the former were earning around INR 60K-80K per month.

After a month or two, I started making the same amount of money my friends were making.

Today I am at a point where some days I make in one day what my employee friends earn in a month.

Slowly and steadily, my income continued to grow, because my income was not limited by someone, but my income depended on the amount of work I did.

This is the beauty of being a freelancer or starting a business.

However, I would like to point out that it is not as easy as it sounds.

Starting a business / self-employment is extremely challenging and stressful.

However, if you put in the effort and do the right thing, it can be extremely rewarding.

If you want a stable, stress-free lifestyle, business is not for you.

Why most people choose a job over a business:

The initial phase of being hired in a company feels pretty good, you complete your graduation, there is already a company waiting for you to pay you a salary.

It feels good to start earning money right after college.

Shortly after completing my graduation, most of my friends were enjoying vacations, traveling because they had already been placed, and were awaiting their entry date.

While, on the other hand, I was running around town in scorching heat to find clients.

They had the guarantee that they would be paid for the work they do.

On the other hand, I had no idea if I could make money this month.

To sum it up in one line: "It was very hard."

Stress and other aspects of life:

Even though I earn a lot more money than my classmates, I can't say that his life sucks.

In fact, many of my friends who work as employees have a much happier and stress-free life than I do.

They can relax when they get home, they can afford to have sex, they don't have to worry about work when they go to sleep.

But that does not imply that I have a boring and boring life, it is just that I enjoy doing things that they would not do.

I love working more than 14 hours a day, instead of relaxing.

I love reading a lot of books instead of watching a TV series.

I love giving up love / relationships for the sake of achieving my long-term goals.

I love being awake, planning things instead of sleeping another hour.

Over time, I started to enjoy these things and now they have become part of my lifestyle.

Is money everything?

No, it's not.

Although I earn decent money, that does not mean that I do it solely for the purpose of making money.

I would do all of the things mentioned above, even if I didn't get paid for it.

I would do it for free just because I like it.

Money is just a by-product / measure of your performance that indicates how well you are doing.

My final verdict:

Which is better: a job or a business?

It all depends on what kind of lifestyle you would like.

If you like being a workaholic and you wouldn't mind working longer hours and making sacrifices, then do business.

If you want a balanced and happy life and you are not worried about money, then look for a job.

Thanks for the A2A, Hunter.

The worst job I ever had was as a library assistant. What made it so horrible was a picky boss. But in a way, it was also the best job I had because I learned something about human nature and how to make the best of a bad situation.

I was in high school at the time and got a work permit when I turned 15. I wanted to earn my own money and hated babysitting. So when I saw this part-time library page job being advertised, I jumped on it. I loved the library, I loved reading, and I thought working in the library would be fun. I went to an interview with

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Thanks for the A2A, Hunter.

The worst job I ever had was as a library assistant. What made it so horrible was a picky boss. But in a way, it was also the best job I had because I learned something about human nature and how to make the best of a bad situation.

I was in high school at the time and got a work permit when I turned 15. I wanted to earn my own money and hated babysitting. So when I saw this part-time library page job being advertised, I jumped on it. I loved the library, I loved reading, and I thought working in the library would be fun. I went to an interview with some kind of county library board and they hired me on the spot.

The branch of the library I was assigned to was small, housed in a converted Jenny Lind log house, and run by an elderly librarian who took a look at my fringed leather vest and miniskirt and said maybe I should dress more conservatively. for work. Everyone called this lady Miss M, and she ran that library like an admiral on a warship.

For me, work assignments were pretty basic: two days after school for two hours and four hours on Saturday morning, putting books on the shelves, and doing little library jobs.

The first day I reported, Miss M (and I say she was old; I remember her as a gouged-toothed witch, but she was probably no more than 55 years old) sat me down and told me exactly what she thought of young people. people (not many) and our horrible work ethic. Then he pointed to a cart full of books and told me to put them away. It took me about 45 minutes. When I informed him that I was done, he pulled out a list and went to check my work. In fact, he had typed a list of the returned books that had been in that cart, probably about 75 volumes. And he had done it with an old typewriter. This was before computers and book scanning to check or check out.

I will never forget following Miss M as she walked through the library, looking at each book. Fortunately (or maybe unfortunately), I had put all the books in their correct spaces. But she said I hadn't "lined up the edges" correctly and made me go through the entire library, matching the spines of the books to the edge of the shelves.

I worked in the library for about a year, my sophomore year and most of my junior year in high school. I kept complaining to my mother and wanting to quit, but my mother said it was good practice for the real world to deal with Miss M, and that I should try to earn the old bag. I really tried. I was never a minute late for work, I never sat at work and if I couldn't find anything to do I would grab a rag and dust off. Miss M made me clean the bathrooms (even though a janitor came every day to do that), washed the windows, vacuumed, cleaned the warehouse. At Christmas, I was able to put the Christmas decorations on, and that was kind of fun until Miss M told me that the decorations were not symmetrical and I had to remove them all and put them back.

I finally found another job at a local bank that paid more money, and I went to Miss M to give my notice. Imagine my surprise when tears came to her eyes and she said she would really miss me. Of course, they could have been tears of joy. But throughout college, every time he came home to visit, he would go to the library to visit Miss M, and she would always act like she was his long-lost daughter.

Miss M passed away when I was in law school and attended her funeral. I felt bad because there were so few people there. I think Miss M loved her library, but she never cared so much about people. I also think he probably liked her a lot, in his own way.

Additional work in addition to your full-time job is one of the fastest ways to improve your financial situation. You can use that extra income to build an emergency fund, pay off debts like student loans, or, if you want to think about the bigger picture, start a new career, a new business, and a new life.

Make sure you don't hate its side hustle, though, otherwise it wouldn't make sense - it'll run out pretty soon, and you'll drop everything altogether. So when you choose your side hustle, make sure it is something that you are passionate about. You will last longer this way :)

Let's go!

1. Sell ite

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Additional work in addition to your full-time job is one of the fastest ways to improve your financial situation. You can use that extra income to build an emergency fund, pay off debts like student loans, or, if you want to think about the bigger picture, start a new career, a new business, and a new life.

Make sure you don't hate its side hustle, though, otherwise it wouldn't make sense - it'll run out pretty soon, and you'll drop everything altogether. So when you choose your side hustle, make sure it is something that you are passionate about. You will last longer this way :)

Let's go!

1. Sell items online.

Selling items on eBay or Craigslist is one of the easiest side activities you'll see on this list (and also why it comes up in the first place). It requires little investment and is low risk. It can be branded clothing and accessories, electronics, computers and accessories, antiques, etc.

2. Rent extra space on Airbnb.

If you have extra space to rent in your home or on your property, Airbnb is for you. Depending on where you are, you can easily earn an additional $ 2,000 a month by renting your space.

If you can outsource the cleaning and maintenance of the rental space, you can turn your earnings from the Airbnb side hustle into passive income!

3. Become a local travel guide in your area.

Did you know that you can also become a travel guide through Airbnb? Just create an Airbnb 'Experience' to include in the app in your local area and you're in business.

4. Teach English online.

If you have a bachelor's degree, a high-speed internet connection, and a headset, then you could earn up to $ 26 teaching English online as a side idea.

Companies like Magic Ears and VIP KID allow you to work remotely as little or as often as you like as an online teacher. Some resources require you to have a title, but not all.

5. Become an SMM or VA.

If you are good with social media and know how to reach people on various platforms, you could start your own social media management business.

Virtual assistants can also be social media administrators or can simply be used to complete administrative tasks such as email and customer service.

MORE side hustle idea in this episode: BEST side hustle you can start in 2020

Campus Security - Night Shift

  • I spent 6 hours walking around my university campus every night, alone. I secured the buildings, locked the doors, made sure the people inside were supposed to be there, etc. Spending the entire shift mostly just was the perfect job for an introvert like me.
  • I had a few breaks so I took my books with me and was able to study at different times during my shift.
  • I would never have discovered the field of human factors psychology if I hadn't noticed a flyer on a cork board one night in a dark hallway in the Psych building. Due to that serendipitous moment, I graduated sch
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Campus Security - Night Shift

  • I spent 6 hours walking around my university campus every night, alone. I secured the buildings, locked the doors, made sure the people inside were supposed to be there, etc. Spending the entire shift mostly just was the perfect job for an introvert like me.
  • I had a few breaks so I took my books with me and was able to study at different times during my shift.
  • I would never have discovered the field of human factors psychology if I hadn't noticed a flyer on a cork board one night in a dark hallway in the Psych building. Because of that serendipitous moment, I went to graduate school and got my Ph.D. in Psychology, and eventually ended up designing software in Silicon Valley.
  • We had to call the University Operator to check into each building (I guess to make sure we were still alive?). One of those operators was my girlfriend, who later became my wife (married for over 30 years).
  • I was able to explore each floor of each building on two large campuses. That was great and fun (eg exploring the museum and seeing all the exhibits, seeing every floor of all the libraries).
  • I met the most amazing and quirky people. Brilliant and fascinating janitorial staff (one guy had a Ph.D., another had served in WWII). A couple in the basement of the Art building. He was painting a huge canvas in a dimly lit corner while his girlfriend watched and played the violin. So many stories ...

I didn't have high hopes for the job when I took it. Most people may not have enjoyed it. It could be creepy on a stormy night to be alone and walk through dark buildings late at night. But I ended up loving the experience.

Well, I am currently a professor who is working in a startup at the same time.

So when teaching, it is best to see how I influence children. How at first they think they are worth nothing, but then they get inspired and achieve a lot.

The best thing is to see them prosper.

A boy, he is studying dentistry here is Kazakhstan. Let's say you are more of rural descent. Being an English teacher allowed me to show him that he is worth much more than he thinks. He plans to study medicine abroad in the future and had won a scholarship at his current university.

On startup ... well

I think that he

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Well, I am currently a professor who is working in a startup at the same time.

So when teaching, it is best to see how I influence children. How at first they think they are worth nothing, but then they get inspired and achieve a lot.

The best thing is to see them prosper.

A boy, he is studying dentistry here is Kazakhstan. Let's say you are more of rural descent. Being an English teacher allowed me to show him that he is worth much more than he thinks. He plans to study medicine abroad in the future and had won a scholarship at his current university.

On startup ... well

I think the best thing is to meet new people. So many exciting talented new people. Also I like that everyone in our team is working for an idea and we all are very motivated and energetic. Maybe we do receive an insufficient amount of sleep but it all pays off when we see great reviews on our MVP version of an app.

So yeah being paid is cool and all but when what you do makes you miserable, believe me, you’re gonna hate it no matter how high your income is.

I see most jobs as some form of problem solving, I believe problem solving to be a key to happiness it’s just a case of finding problems I enjoy solving.

Doing any particular job to the best of my ability, having the knowledge that whatever I am doing, I do it in such a way that I perceive that it is the right and proper way that it should be done. Being able to explain in detail why and how I completed the work that way, but without needing to explain myself.

That's when I see it as a job well done, usually if it's done right it will come with a certain level of satisfaction and therefore also

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I see most jobs as a form of problem solving, I think problem solving is the key to happiness, it is just a case of finding problems that I enjoy solving.

Doing any particular job to the best of my ability, having the knowledge that whatever I am doing, I do it in such a way that I perceive that it is the right and proper way that it should be done. Being able to explain in detail why and how I completed the work that way, but without needing to explain myself.

Ahí es cuando lo veo como un trabajo bien hecho, por lo general, si se hace bien, llegará con un nivel de satisfacción y, por lo tanto, también me pondrá una sonrisa en la cara o al menos me hará sentir bien conmigo mismo.

Me gusta hacer fotografías. Me dedico a la fotografía desde hace más de cuarenta años.

Hace muchos años, mientras intentaba ganar un poco de dinero extra, tomé algunos trabajos tomando fotos para la gente. Algunos para amigos y colegas. Un par de bodas para amigos que no tenían dinero suficiente para pagarle a un fotógrafo profesional.

En ese entonces hacía fotografía en blanco y negro casi el 100% del tiempo. Las personas que me preguntaron lo sabían y estaban contentas con los resultados.

However, my darkroom was my garage converted to be airtight. It was still a garage deep down. So in the winter it would be pretty cold

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I like to take pictures. I have been in photography for more than forty years.

Many years ago, while trying to earn a little extra money, I took some jobs taking photos for people. Some for friends and colleagues. A couple of weddings for friends who didn't have enough money to pay for a professional photographer.

Back then I did black and white photography almost 100% of the time. The people who asked me knew and were happy with the results.

However, my darkroom was my garage converted to make it light tight. It was still a garage at heart. So, in the winter, I would be quite cold while producing prints of subjects that didn’t hold any personal interest to me. Don’t get me wrong, the people were great I did like them. It was just that producing the photos was just a job.

When I take photos for myself I have an (artistic) interest in the result. Finding that the shot that I had believed would be good when I pressed the shutter was actually great gave me a thrill. I just never felt this way about stuff I took as a commission.

I made a decision to stop taking on jobs for other people and to enjoy my photography. This way I can take what I like when I like and leave the paid work to the professionals.

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