What makes Trivandrum the city of the future?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Esther Nixon



What makes Trivandrum the city of the future?

Trivandrum, an evergreen city of India, has surprisingly managed to remain quite different from all other capitals of India. Let me tell you how.

The city has evolved to become one of India's leading IT and ITES hubs contributing around 55% of Kerala's total software exports.

Solid waste management at the source, smart bus stops, multi-level parking lots, switching from various utility lines to underground conduits, electric car projects, walkways and bike lanes.

The outer ring road, the Thiruvananthapuram metro, the Vizhinjam international port.

It is proposed to build a semi-high-speed rail project on the Kochuveli-Kasaragod rail corridor.

The Vikram Sarabhai Space Center, the most important and main center of ISRO.

And also the decision to add another terminal to the existing Trivandrum airport.

Imagine the city with all these wonderful projects.

I have just listed some future projects in the city. But if you watch this video you will realize that Trivandrum is undoubtedly the city of the future.

The nightlife of each city has a different experience depending on the local cultural contexts. But essentially all the media, people active in the streets or public spaces at night, mostly with the intention of doing it after 7 in the afternoon. It could be shopping or cultural or personal entertainment programs or many like that.

Considering all these aspects, in general Kerala cities do not have an active nightlife beyond some Thattukadas (street vendors of night food) and some cafes / restaurants open 24 hours.

Temple festivals (as well as churches / mosques) are the most common nightlife events in Kerala societies.

Kathakali night performances

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The nightlife of each city has a different experience depending on the local cultural contexts. But essentially all the media, people active in the streets or public spaces at night, mostly with the intention of doing it after 7 in the afternoon. It could be shopping or cultural or personal entertainment programs or many like that.

Considering all these aspects, in general Kerala cities do not have an active nightlife beyond some Thattukadas (street vendors of night food) and some cafes / restaurants open 24 hours.

Temple festivals (as well as churches / mosques) are the most common nightlife events in Kerala societies.

Kathakali night performances or Thiruvathira performances in the month of December, in many temples and social forums there are some forms of traditional nightlife in Kerala society.

That said, there are few traditional activities that take place at night, such as temple festivals and their associated rituals such as the elephant show and fireworks, theatrical activities such as theater, theatrical and more traditional nature shows such as recitals. Kathakali, etc. But none of these are daily activities. , quite limited to a few days a year.

It is often a question, why there is no nightlife activity, especially in urban areas when almost every major city in the country has some kind of active nightlife.

Let me try to help identify the key reasons that I think could be the main reasons. '

Early to Bed-Rise concept

Kerala society in general is very traditional in nature, although it is liberal. Most Malaysians uphold many traditional values ​​passed down from generation to generation.

One of those traditional values ​​is the concept of going to bed and getting up early. Most Malayalee families are used to the concept of going to bed early. It is very typical to see a good majority of Malaysians go to sleep at 10 o'clock at night or even earlier.

This happens because Malaysian society is also used to getting up early. There is a religious factor in it.

In ancient times, most upper caste Hindus, especially women, were used to the concept of visiting temples during Nirmalayam pooja and abishekhams. Most of the temples in Kerala open before Brahmamuhurtham, that is, mostly between 3 and 4 in the morning, a tradition that is still followed in almost all temples even today. To be in the temple at 4 a.m., it is natural for people to wake up at least at 3 a.m., which means they have to go to bed much earlier.

Although morning rites are common in many temples in India, I have not seen it as a social custom for local people to be in temples as early as in Kerala. This is not just limited to temples. Many churches have their morning Masses at 5:45 a.m. M. So like many devout Muslims they visit mosques for morning prayers.

This cultural trait continues even today in many families, even if they do not intend to go to the temple or the church / mosque. It is common to see people wake up between 5 and 6 in the morning and it is almost a common ritual that all Malaysians, regardless of their urban or rural origin, spend a few hours reading newspapers and discussing issues and controversies from the day before before the breakfast.

Waking up early and reading the newspaper in the morning hours is a pervasive feature of Malayalee.

The myths and their sexual association.

Unique to the Malay culture, there are several popular myths and folklores, which associate the night with evil spirits, yakshis, gandharvas, etc. from time immemorial. The Malayalam word for nightlife is Nishacharani, which is a term often associated with Yakshis.

The cult of associating the beauty of the night with the heavenly beauty of the yakshis and their craving for sexual relations with humans are so popular in Malayalam literary works, very romantic in movies even today. While this concept has been heavily embedded in the Malay psyche, equally with the emergence of rational movements that pushed the scientific temperament, many accept that they are mere folk tales / myths etc.

Sex workers can be found on many streets, looking for clients at night.

In this period, a new class of sex workers (prostitutes) actively emerged in society to care for Malaysian males who entered the culture of monogamy after 50 but still yearn for their polygamous past. The culture of these sex workers is not just limited to urban centers. Rather, even in remote villages, such people can be found, disguising themselves and roaming the normal streets in search of customers. This effectively replaced or realigned with the concept of Yakshi for prostitutes, as they both like sexual gratification, thus associating nights solely for such activities.

Therefore, women / girls found wandering the streets alone at night are often associated with or seen as prostitutes / sex workers and it is common for some men to make lewd comments as part of provocations. So, in society, a general impression emerged that women / girls with integrity and chastity (Kulasthree as in Malayalam or Sanskari Nari as in Hindi) are not expected to prowl or wander the streets once the sun goes down. This is applicable even to men who see themselves as noble / knights. Wandering at night is often associated with rebellious attitudes, although it is not strictly applied to men as opposed to women.

A news article on Asianet News about how women feel walking alone at night. Most complain about how they are approached by men who think that all women on the street are sex workers.

One difference I felt is that, in many parts of the country, sex workers were mainly concentrated in urban centers, where again they were confined to a small suburb specially designed for them, like Kamathipura in Bombay or Sonagachi in Calcutta, etc. sex workers in other parts of the city at night (of course, there are very likely isolated cases). In contrast, in Kerala cities, there are no specific streets or suburbs for them. Rather, they are present on almost every street, looking for clients at night, which has reinforced the stereotype of assuming all street women at night as sex workers.

Legal aspect

A key reason that nightlife stops is likewise the law.

Kerala's Establishments and Shops Law requires all shops to be closed at 10 pm Although it allows shop owners to set their hours of operation, the law is strict regarding the working hours of their employees. Under this law, an employee can work only 8 hours per day in a shift. And the female employees cannot work past 7 in the afternoon.

This means that a store that opens at 10 a.m. M. In the morning, it has to close at 7 pm. M. At night (after the mandatory one-hour lunch break) when a shift is completed. The law allows a maximum of 50 hours in a quarter of the year as overtime, which translates into less than half an hour of overtime as overtime. So it is definitely impossible for a shop owner to have a second shift only for 3 hours (7pm to 10pm), so most of them end at 8pm So, like most business units in Kerala They close at 8pm, there is not much space for night shopping that is an integral part of the night life of the city. Instead, a culture emerged in which most shopping activities occur during the day, especially in the afternoons.

Another law that restricts nightlife is the one that governs the operation of pubs / bars, etc. In most places, its pubs / bars fuel the nightlife, especially among young people. Kerala Abkari laws prohibit independent bars / pubs etc. All of these businesses must operate within a hotel rated 3 stars or higher. Most 3-star hotel bars are designed for hen parties who like to drink a lot, rather than a social gathering, so they are not suitable for families or girls / women etc. Only bars / pubs that operate in 4 stars and 5 star ones are family friendly which are expensive with all kinds of luxury / sin taxes etc, making get-togethers occasions like once in a blue moon instead of a regular occasion.

Police raids on drug parties are very common in Kerala and the posting of such videos created a fear factor to organize more.

There are strong restrictions on party life in hotels due to the widespread flow of drugs and other prohibited substances that are common in those places. Unlike other states, the Kerala Anti-Narcotics Police are very strict when it comes to controlling them, as they even place undercover policemen / CID at party venues to keep an eye out for narcotics. There are even laws that prohibit party halls / dance floors from having dim lights to prevent any drug trafficking cases. Periodic raids between parties to catch drugs are common and are videotaped and broadcast on channels, causing embarrassment to many, even if they have not used drugs. And there are extensive police checks to curb drunk driving cases and Kerala is among the top states reporting such cases. This leads to a serious decrease in the number of matches and events of this type.

Urbanization difference

This matter is often ignored in any discussion, but I think it is very important in the context of Kerala.

In almost every state in India, nightlife and its associated glitz and glamor are strongly associated with urban centers, particularly the major cities that are the economic centers of the state. One can find a vibrant nightlife in Bangalore, something that is not seen in the city of Kolar, which is just an hour's drive (50 kms) from the city. There is a distinctive urban culture that distinguishes itself from the towns and villages of the rest of the state.

The expansion of urbanization in Kerala. It almost forms a continuous chain of cities from northern Kerala to Kochi and further south where it is slightly broken mainly due to the presence of large lakes / backwaters and some major rural areas. With this type of urban pattern, urban culture is fairly uniform across the state.

However, this differs in Kerala. Generally, the increase in the urban population growth rate is the result of an excessive concentration in existing cities, especially in cities with more than one million inhabitants. However, in Kerala, the main reason for the growth of the urban population is the increase in the number of urban areas, as well as the urbanization of the peri-urban areas of the existing main urban centers. Kerala is very unique in the settlement pattern also with a continuous expansion of the habitation without much open land or fields separating the dwellings. So you go out of a city, you actually go into another city with no vacant lot in between.

Furthermore, the infrastructure facilities available to the general population do not vary much between rural and urban areas. One can find a 4-star and in many cases 5-star resort in many small towns / rural belts of the state.

This has fueled an urban culture quite the same or similar in Kerala. The culture of smaller towns like Malappuram or Kottayam or Pala or Thiruvalla is not radically different from urban life in major cities like Kochi or Trivandrum.

None of the cities in Kerala grew due to the immigration of outsiders to a city. Rather, they grew mainly due to the expansion of urban areas as such. This means that there were no major changes in the existing local culture. Imagine, if a city becomes so diverse with multiple crowds from various parts of the country and abroad, automatically the culture of the city changes. That is why the culture of Bangalore is not the culture of most Karnataka towns / cities. This is not the case in Kerala, as most cities in Kerala have a pan-Kerala culture, with an absolute majority following Malayalee sensibilities and values. This is one of the main reasons why the culture of the main cities does not change.

And finally the weather

Heavy rains make social life prohibitive during the afternoons

Kerala has a very unique climate. It almost rains a lot for 7 to 8 months out of the year. And throughout this period, especially during the 2-month-long northeast monsoon (October to November period), the rains are strongest during the afternoon hours. It is difficult to walk or wander the streets or participate in an active nightlife in such weather. Roads flood and it is difficult to walk on flooded streets that have limited lighting facilities. And when it does not rain, the humidity is maximum at night. All of these factors influence the decision not to venture too far into shopping / night out.


That being said, the Kerala government is seriously trying to boost active nightlife as part of promoting more service sector industries in Kerala, which may attract outsiders who regularly highlight the lack of nightlife as a negative factor to invest in. in Kerala.

One such attempt is the Kerala government policy to renew the Shops / Establishments law which gives more flexibility to shop owners.

Second, there are proposals to incentivize night shopping with tax cuts, etc., as an effective way to reduce traffic congestion during the day and push more special tourist products (Thanks to NATPAC)

Kerala government advertisement promoting women to feel safe at night, with the help of the Pink Patrol Police

Third, featuring more Pink Patrol (Lady Police patrol teams) at night to bring a sense of security to ladies who dare to venture out onto the streets at night.

And also the introduction of special night transport with incentive schemes for bus operators to operate more services at night, which gives people more confidence to go out.

However, these are all slow processes and cannot change cultural traits / patterns overnight. But little by little, Kerala will definitely join the night shopping culture much more than it is prevalent today.

1) While stopping at a red light, you can see the MLA / MP vehicle escorted by the police stopping along with you. Elsewhere, police personnel will be ready near the crossing clearing a path for the VIP to avoid the traffic light.
2) The presence of the police often gives a sense of security. Not once have I seen the police misbehave towards citizens. And kudos to the traffic police officers, who monitor traffic at uncontrolled crossings during rush hour.
3) I usually have a pleasant experience in government. offices and other institutions here. I collected my passport from the postman wi

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1) While stopping at a red light, you can see the MLA / MP vehicle escorted by the police stopping along with you. Elsewhere, police personnel will be ready near the crossing clearing a path for the VIP to avoid the traffic light.
2) The presence of the police often gives a sense of security. Not once have I seen the police misbehave towards citizens. And kudos to the traffic police officers, who monitor traffic at uncontrolled crossings during rush hour.
3) I usually have a pleasant experience in government. offices and other institutions here. I collected my passport from the postman without any difficulty. In my hometown, you would expect me to offer money, it can be from fifty to one hundred rupees. Once the postman was expecting some money when he handed me the letter of incorporation for my job.
4) Your things will not be stolen. I usually leave my helmet on my bike, once I even left the shopping bag on my bike and no one touched it. In other states, you would sometimes have to worry about cycling too! (just exaggerating).
5) Whenever I ride my bike alone during the day, you often find school students in uniform requesting a ride. It's always a pleasure, even though it's difficult to communicate with them because I don't fully understand Malayalam (fuck my ass).
6) Most areas of the city are clean. Compared to other cities, Trivandrum is relatively dust-free.

But, as usual, there are rare exceptions to all of the above.

Thiruvananthapuram has a completely different atmosphere compared to other metropolitan cities and capitals in India. It is a city where you can have a calm and peaceful environment. The city has two faces ... or three. You can have a quiet life in the city center, while the outer regions of the city is what is developing rapidly. Even in the city there are many environmentalists. It is also one of the rarest cities in India that has an international airport in its own central business district. The city serves around one million people. Within the city you have two beaches Shangumukham and

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Thiruvananthapuram has a completely different atmosphere compared to other metropolitan cities and capitals in India. It is a city where you can have a calm and peaceful environment. The city has two faces ... or three. You can have a quiet life in the city center, while the outer regions of the city is what is developing rapidly. Even in the city there are many environmentalists. It is also one of the rarest cities in India that has an international airport in its own central business district. The city serves around one million people. Within the city you have two beaches Shangumukham and Kovalam and on the outskirts of the city you have Poovar and Varkala. Our Mahathma Gandhiji had referred to this city as the Evergreen City of India. Trivandrum has a Ponnmudi hill station on its east side. Trivandrum is an isolated city bordering mainly rural areas and the other 4 municipalities in the district are far from the city. Rural areas are also under development due to the arrival of phase 4 of TechnoPark - The first and largest Information Technology Park in the country. Trivandrum has a Museum and a Zoo on the same Campus in the heart of the city. . Trivandrum has a Museum and a Zoo on the same Campus in the heart of the city. . Trivandrum has a Museum and a Zoo on the same Campus in the heart of the city. .

Here are some things not to be missed if you are visiting Trivandrum for the first time.

  • Ponmudi: it is a mountain station about 60 kms from the city of Trivandrum. Plan a bike ride that, trust me, will be worth it.
  • On the way to Ponmudi there is a waterfall. It's a long way to see this thing. Also, you are not allowed in, but you can take great pictures.
  • Canoeing in Poovar: don't miss it.
  • Varkala Beach - Some people call it mini Goa. If you want to have that "mini Goa" experience, plan to visit this place between November and February. If you go during other days it would look something like belo
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Here are some things not to be missed if you are visiting Trivandrum for the first time.

  • Ponmudi: it is a mountain station about 60 kms from the city of Trivandrum. Plan a bike ride that, trust me, will be worth it.
  • On the way to Ponmudi there is a waterfall. It's a long way to see this thing. Also, you are not allowed in, but you can take great pictures.
  • Canoeing in Poovar: don't miss it.
  • Varkala Beach - Some people call it mini Goa. If you want to have that "mini Goa" experience, plan to visit this place between November and February. If you go during other days, it would look lower. But it is a picturesque place, good for photographs.
  • Kovalam beach. If you visit, go for a boat ride. A little pricey but worth it.
  • People for Animals - This is an animal rescue center. If you are a pet lover, visit this place.
  • Trivandrum Zoo
  • If you are a Biriyani lover, don't miss this Dhariya Hotel to enjoy a tasty briyani. They only serve biriyani and they will also be available for 1 to 2 hours max.
  • Sulthans Sulaimani (Tea Shop) - Tea lovers / addicts go to this place. Literally my heaven.
  • Bake World Restaurant - People who like Shawarma should try this hotel.
  • Anantya Resort: It is not exactly in Trivandrum, but it is 60 km from the city. Plan a stay here.

Vizhinjam, Poovar, Balaramapuram, Pallichal, Kovalam…. that is, the area south of the city of Thiruvananthapuram. This area will become a center of economic and business growth. This is due to the following reasons.

  1. VIZHINJAM INTERNATIONAL PORT - Prepare for impact! The deepest and one of the largest port in India is nearing completion. This port, which is the closest in India to International Searoute, will divert all Asian transshipments from existing ports.
  2. BETTER CONNECTIVITY: The city of Trivandrum is directly connected to the North South Corridor through a new alignment without signs of 4 lanes or
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Vizhinjam, Poovar, Balaramapuram, Pallichal, Kovalam…. that is, the area south of the city of Thiruvananthapuram. This area will become a center of economic and business growth. This is due to the following reasons.

  1. VIZHINJAM INTERNATIONAL PORT - Prepare for impact! The deepest and one of the largest port in India is nearing completion. This port, which is the closest in India to International Searoute, will divert all Asian transshipments from existing ports.
  2. BETTER CONNECTIVITY - The city of Trivandrum is directly connected to the North South Corridor via NH 66's new 4-lane signless alignment via Kovalam, Vizhinjam, Karode, Nagercoil and Kavalkinaru. It is the first concrete road in Kerala and you can have a traffic free access without signs to the North South Corridor, through which you can access all the cities in India. In addition, the doubling and electrification of the Trivandrum Chennai railway line and the rail connectivity to the port of Vizhinjam from the port of Balaramapuram add to this. The six lanes of the existing national highway that passes through Balaramapuram to Tamil Nadu are also in full swing.
  3. NEW INDUSTRIES - South Trivandrum is experiencing rapid growth in terms of industries. Kerala Automobiles Limited's refurbished electric vehicle factory in Neyyattinkara, the upcoming electric bus factory in KAL, Balaramapuram Spinning Mill, etc. are some examples of this.
  4. OUTER RING ROAD CORRIDOR - Kerala government ORR project, mainly emphasizing the commercial progress of Trivandrum passing through this region
  5. CHEAP LAND AVAILABLE AND EMERGING REAL ESTATE DEMAND
  6. UPGRADE OF THE NEMOM RAILWAY STATION AS A SOUTH TERMINAL OF TRIVANDRUM - This will attract dozens of new residents to move and settle in the south of the city of Trivandrum.

I hope this information helps ...

No.

Indian cities can be classified on the basis of various parameters. However, there are two main bases for classification by the government. from India. One is based on HRA and the other is based on population.

According to the HRA classification, Indian cities can be classified into three groups X, Y and Z.

There are 8 cities ranked X (highest on the list). They are Ahmedabad, Bangalore, Chennai, Delhi, Hyderabad, Kolkata, Mumbai, Pune.

Thiruvananthapuram, Kochi and some other major cities in Kerala are classified as Y.

According to the population, Indian cities are classified into 6 groups. Level 1 to T

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No.

Indian cities can be classified on the basis of various parameters. However, there are two main bases for classification by the government. from India. One is based on HRA and the other is based on population.

According to the HRA classification, Indian cities can be classified into three groups X, Y and Z.

There are 8 cities ranked X (highest on the list). They are Ahmedabad, Bangalore, Chennai, Delhi, Hyderabad, Kolkata, Mumbai, Pune.

Thiruvananthapuram, Kochi and some other major cities in Kerala are classified as Y.

According to the population, Indian cities are classified into 6 groups. Level 1 to Level 6.

Thiruvananthapuram is classified as a Tier 2 city along with Kochi and a few other cities.

As defined by the Census Commission, Metropolitan City is a city with a population of over 1 million (10 Lakhs). There are 46 metropolitan cities in India. Therefore, none of the cities in Kerala can be called a Metropolitan City.

The population of Trivandrum is 957,730 and Kochi is 601,574.

I would say Trivandrum! The reasons are that I have lived in Bangalore for 4 years and find it highly polluted, less green, hectic life schedules, horrible and expensive traffic.

Traffic is so stagnant that at times, I felt like I had to get out of my car and walk! If you are a person who loves subway life, night life, etc., you would love Bangalore as there are many options available.

In Trivandrum, you have less traffic, the cost of living is much lower, the cost of education is much lower, the expenses are also lower. There is so much greenery that you can have your own plot / villa at a moderate rate.

It depends on the size of the family, the standard of living, the additional expenditure on education, entertainment, etc.

For a family of four, 27,000 is enough for a comfortable life.

Itemwise

Rent + electricity + water 11000

Groceries + gas. 7000.

Newspaper + milk 1500.

Transport 2500

Cloth + entertainment 2000

Vegetable + NV. 2000

Other contingencies 1000

For this, you need to get at least 30,000 for education expenses to be included as well.

I love making comparisons between things and as a guy who has lived in both Trivandrum and Kochi, I think I can post my opinion here. However, choosing which city is better in this case largely depends on the type of person you are.

I would like to point out the stark contrast in culture, because the rest of the changes are simply a consequence of this change. Trivandrum still reminds of its ancient Tamil culture. There are still many Brahmins here who live in small houses near the temples, which is a symbol of their Tamil ancestry. Although many cities have adopted a Bengali workforce, Triv

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I love making comparisons between things and as a guy who has lived in both Trivandrum and Kochi, I think I can post my opinion here. However, choosing which city is better in this case largely depends on the type of person you are.

I would like to point out the stark contrast in culture, because the rest of the changes are simply a consequence of this change. Trivandrum still reminds of its ancient Tamil culture. There are still many Brahmins here who live in small houses near the temples, which is a symbol of their Tamil ancestry. Despite the fact that many cities have adopted a Bengali workforce, Trivandrum is still home to many Tamil workers. At Trivandrum, if you have a little gray hair, light skin, wear a tucked-in shirt, have a round belly, and show up in an expensive car, you're pretty much guaranteed to be respected wherever you go, as people tend to do so. I think of you as a Travancore aristocrat (Sorry if I offended someone, but most aristocrats look like this. And yes, maybe I exaggerated a bit. And maybe it's because I'm 20 years old.) Government jobs are considered the best jobs in Trivandrum, which would again make older people, who are retired government workers, more respectable than, say, an IT worker. This would make the elderly population have more money and power in the city than their children. This, combined with the ancestral wealth of most people in Trivandrum, makes Trivandrum a haven for the elderly. The fact that Trivandrum has no shopping malls and very few multiplex cinemas is a direct consequence of the aforementioned phenomenon. This, combined with the ancestral wealth of most people in Trivandrum, makes Trivandrum a haven for the elderly. The fact that Trivandrum has no shopping malls and very few multiplex cinemas is a direct consequence of the aforementioned phenomenon. This, combined with the ancestral wealth of most people in Trivandrum, makes Trivandrum a haven for the elderly. The fact that Trivandrum has no shopping malls and very few multiplex cinemas is a direct consequence of the aforementioned phenomenon.

Of course, this is what I would infer from my experience and it may seem completely wrong to someone else. Trivandrum receives more investment than any other city, because it is the capital. Kazhakootam's projects look promising to offer a more "modern" face to Kazhakootam, which was until now a wasteland. Some even call it the "New Trivandrum". I really hope that the "old" and the "new" Trivandrum (s) combine the best of both worlds and bring progress without diminishing the cultural importance of the city.

Now, let's go to Kochi. Kochi is often designated as a city of youth. This is mainly because Kochi has a more "international" approach to everything. Kochi or specifically Ernakulam has many shopping malls, multiplex cinemas, fast food restaurants, apartments, and high-rise villas. Kochi Airport is leagues ahead of its Trivandrum counterpart; although it is far from the city while the Trivandrum airport is within / very close to the city. Kochi has luxurious 5-star hotels (Marriott, Le Meridian, Taj Gateway) much better than those in Trivandrum (South Park, The Taj, The Leela). The Kochi InfoPark often hosts more events than the Trivandrum TechnoPark, but both are great. When you leave the mainland and enter Mattanchery, a special vibe hits you. Mattanchery houses a lot of things that cannot be found anywhere else in Kerala. The Jewish street, the synagogues, the temples of Judaism, the Jain temples and a plethora of churches illuminate this mystical and fascinating place. Kochi culture is also influenced by many Bengali workers found here. Because Kochi has many businesses, many people from different states stay in Kochi and they all contribute their culture to make Kochi a splendid mix of different religions and beliefs. Kochi also has a very high Christian population, making a Kochi Christmas worth every penny. Active and energetic young people roam the streets writing "Happy New Year" on the roads as firecrackers light up the New Year's Eve sky; people who celebrate the end of the year on the rooftops of their apartments with the best New Years cakes and bottles of whiskey; couples who fell in love on Marine Drive by the river; and the people who go wild at 5 star hotel rooftop parties around Kochi make Kochi the best party place in Kerala. I could go on and on, but I guess you get the idea.

Watch? All that makes Kochi different from Trivandrum is its difference in cultures. They both have pros and cons. Law and order are more strictly enforced in Trivandrum, while Kochi has a much better waste management program. Kochi has many fast food restaurants, but Trivandrum has better schools and universities. Trivandrum is the capital city and therefore it will never die; whereas Kochi depends solely on business in its land, and we all know that commercial cities don't last forever. Surprisingly, the temples are not crowded on Onam and other festivals in Kochi, while Trivandrum, which is home to the richest temple in the world and the temple that holds a Guinness record, has temples packed with people on festive occasions.

So finally Kochi or Trivandrum? It depends on who you are and what you are doing.

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