What kinds of jobs don't need sales or marketing?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Taylor Reid



What kinds of jobs don't need sales or marketing?

Well, there are all kinds of jobs that don't require it either. Every company needs both, but that does not mean that there are no other departments ...

Supply chain.

Customer service.

Administration.

HOUR.

Recruitment.

It's like a buffet

I don't know of any job that doesn't need one or the other! Even babysitters need marketing too! Like going to your local grocery store and putting up a sign that says: Homemade babysitting for your 2-10 year old with their phone number included on the sign or ad! Doing this is called free marketing for your new business startup! Thanks

Jobs where the demand is so high that a sales and marketing strategy is not needed because the demand for the product or service is already high.

This is a tough question! However, I hope this gives you some clarity.

Having worked in both sales and marketing, my personal favorite has been marketing. Both have their unique pros and cons.

Sales has the ability to be a bit more stressful due to production targets and the need to achieve sales figures or targets.

Marketing is usually a little more relaxed, less about performance and more about meeting deadlines with design and projects.

A career in sales tends to generate much more turnover, but it can be more financially rewarding. Unless you're really good at sales or can find a job.

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This is a tough question! However, I hope this gives you some clarity.

Having worked in both sales and marketing, my personal favorite has been marketing. Both have their unique pros and cons.

Sales has the ability to be a bit more stressful due to production targets and the need to achieve sales figures or targets.

Marketing is usually a little more relaxed, less about performance and more about meeting deadlines with design and projects.

A career in sales tends to generate much more turnover, but it can be more financially rewarding. Unless you're really good at sales or can find a job that pays a base salary with bonuses instead of full commission, sales can be a tricky place. A job where pay is based entirely or primarily on commissions can be stressful and you will always want to have good savings to get you through the low months. At the same time, depending on the industry, sales can be much more rewarding than marketing.

A career in marketing tends to be a bit more stable (depending on the environment) with less turnover. Marketing jobs are also much harder to find than sales jobs. Everybody needs sales. Marketing is primarily based on salary with some bonus systems. Although marketing doesn't have as many pressure-driven numbers, because it's more about generating leads than making sales, there can still be some levels of hit numbers through conversion rates based on your industry and product.

If you're more outgoing, structured, people-focused, goal-driven, and enjoy a good argument, sales are for you.

If you are more introverted, creative, design-focused, driven by colors and feelings, and like to observe artistic expressions, marketing is for you.

Sales will require you to spend a lot of time learning your product, studying the industry and your customers. But overall, sales and the sales cycle stay pretty much the same. So once you know the sales and can be good at closing deals, it's pretty transferable.

Marketing, on the other hand, will require you to constantly continue to learn to keep up with innovative new forms of marketing driven by technological advancements. You can never get comfortable with marketing due to online developments and new marketing streams through social media and ads.

Bottom line: Go with your heart, your instincts, and what you'll be passionate about. in the long run. Both marketing and sales can satisfy you in different ways, but in the end, I found more happiness in marketing because of my personality and skill set.

EDIT: Despite my request to separate the questions, Quora Moderation has decided to keep this question paired with what I originally answered: "What are some jobs that don't justify salary?" What I have written does not make sense as an answer to the new question, but the good people of Quora do not seem to understand that they are completely different questions.


Mine! And possibly yours too.

The justification for the income of any individual is found in the free market value of his labor production. That is, a fair income is obtained when the employee (or employer) is willing to contribute

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EDIT: Despite my request to separate the questions, Quora Moderation has decided to keep this question paired with what I originally answered: "What are some jobs that don't justify salary?" What I have written does not make sense as an answer to the new question, but the good people of Quora do not seem to understand that they are completely different questions.


Mine! And possibly yours too.

The justification for the income of any individual is found in the free market value of his labor production. That is, a fair income is obtained when the employee (or business owner) is willing to provide services at the same price that the employer (or client) is willing to pay for those services, without artificial demands from outside parties. Most of these external distortions are government creations:

  • Taxes. I believe that there are some legitimate functions of government at various levels, and I support that taxes are necessary to fund those functions. My argument here is against the distortions that come from an extremely inequitable tax code.
    • Progressive income tax policies reduce the marginal returns to the highest wages; If the natural price of your labor is just above the limit of a certain tax bracket, you will choose to work slightly less and stay in the lower category, or you will demand artificially higher wages to make up for the additional amount lost to taxes.
    • Tax breaks granted to specific industries, corporations, or even specific events (think movie making) allow those companies to inflate their salaries relative to competitors.
  • Compulsory licenses, certification, etc. Conceptually, government licenses should be made on the basis of protecting the public from significant harm, especially when it comes to health problems (although even here I think there are good arguments against compulsory licenses). Now, governments demand all kinds of ridiculous professional licenses: hairdressers, public accountants, interior designers, contractors, etc. Who asks states to implement those licenses? There is no public outrage that these industries are riddled with incompetence and dangerousness. People who want to enforce licensing / certification programs are those who benefit financially from those licenses: companies with established practices,
  • Industry regulations. This one cuts both ways. Compliance in a heavily regulated industry generally means hiring (or hiring) people to ensure that a company is doing what the government wants. Therefore, you have to pay a significant amount of money to people who do little or nothing to improve the value of your company / product. Meanwhile, there is less money available to compensate the people who are actually doing the work.
  • Government competition against the private sector. In the name of reducing the cost to the public or making something more available to consumers (both are typically fallacies), governmental or quasi-governmental institutions place the burden of financial risk on the general public, while often distorting the profits of the employees. by those institutions. Higher education is one of the best examples I can think of here, especially when it comes to income from administrators and sports departments. Some of those salaries might be appropriate for their free market value, but since taxpayers fund so many other things that go on at the institution, it's hard to know if that soccer coach is really worth the millions of dollars they are being paid.
    • Public sector unions are a particularly bad actor here. Matthew Bates pointed to the ridiculous pension packages being given to retired administrators of Illinois public schools. It is inconceivable that we have allowed unions and politicians to collude against taxpayers for benefits that could not otherwise be justified.

So let's look at a few different jobs and think critically about whether the jobs really reflect a "market price."

  • Doctors. A 2017 survey showed median earnings for physicians of $ 294,000. Pediatricians are on the low side averaging $ 202,000, while orthopedic surgeons averaging $ 489,000. What determines your earnings? Almost all of a doctor's income comes from a third party, be it a public or private insurance plan. Insurers have reimbursement programs that base their rates on things like how many tests are requested, how much time is spent with a patient, the complexity of the patient's health problems, and more. Lately, there has been a major push to create a system that pays for results rather than job input, although this is an overly simplistic approach to a very difficult problem. I will not go into all the other problems that affect our healthcare system, Except to note that the regulatory burden is increasing exponentially. further increasing system costs. My point here is that there is a huge distortion in physician compensation because the consumer is actually two parties: the patient and the insurer. The patient, who initiates the transaction and receives the product, has a very different motivation than the insurer, which pays for the product but does not receive anything directly from the doctor. If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . who initiates the transaction and receives the product, has a very different motivation from that of the insurer, who pays for the product but does not receive anything directly from the doctor. If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . Whoever initiates the transaction and receives the product has a very different motivation from that of the insurer, who pays for the product but does not receive anything directly from the doctor. If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . Whoever initiates the transaction and receives the product has a very different motivation from that of the insurer, who pays for the product but does not receive anything directly from the doctor. If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . Whoever initiates the transaction and receives the product has a very different motivation from that of the insurer, who pays for the product but does not receive anything directly from the doctor. If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . your employer selects your insurance and pays most of it with money the employee never sees. . Whoever initiates the transaction and receives the product has a very different motivation from that of the insurer, who pays for the product but does not receive anything directly from the doctor. If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . your employer selects your insurance and pays most of it with money the employee never sees. . Whoever initiates the transaction and receives the product has a very different motivation from that of the insurer, who pays for the product but does not receive anything directly from the doctor. If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. .
  • Minimum wage employees. Not only do minimum wage laws skew the price of menial work, they also make it difficult for employers to structure their compensation plans to offer scheduled raises and financial incentives for quality work. The average McDonald's employee lasts about 3 months. I'm curious what that number would be if a franchise owner could pay $ 6 / hour when hired, but with a planned increase to $ 8 / hour at 3 months and $ 10 / hour at 6 months. It may also include some performance bonuses. Who knows where the correct starting salary is, what should be the timing and amount of raises and what might be the right incentives for performance? What works for one restaurant (even in the same company) is probably not suitable for another restaurant, and is almost certainly not suitable for someone who operates a car wash or landscaping service. Minimum wage laws also restrict entry to the market for low-skilled employees. If a business owner can only pay $ 6 / hour for a new hire and there are people willing to work at $ 6 / hour, then a law that requires them to be paid at $ 7.25 / hour means that they are actually paid $ 0 / hour, because they don't hire you. Talk about an unfair salary! And it's almost certainly not suitable for someone who operates a car wash or landscaping service. Minimum wage laws also restrict entry to the market for low-skilled employees. If a business owner can only pay $ 6 / hour for a new hire and there are people willing to work at $ 6 / hour, then a law that requires them to be paid at $ 7.25 / hour means that they are actually paid $ 0 / hour, because they don't hire you. Talk about an unfair salary! And it's almost certainly not suitable for someone who operates a car wash or landscaping service. Minimum wage laws also restrict entry to the market for low-skilled employees. If a business owner can only pay $ 6 / hour for a new hire and there are people willing to work at $ 6 / hour, then a law that requires them to be paid at $ 7.25 / hour means that they are actually paid $ 0 / hour, because they don't hire you. Talk about an unfair salary! 25 / hour means they are actually paid $ 0 / hour, because they don't hire you. Talk about an unfair salary! 25 / hour means they are actually paid $ 0 / hour, because they don't hire you. Talk about an unfair salary!
  • CEOs, CFOs, Presidents, Vice Presidents, and all the other corporate baddies. Few people have such a complex salary structure as large corporate executives. There is a base salary. There are bonuses, both guaranteed and based on performance. There are common stock payments, but there are also stock options. Who determines how much the person is paid and how is that payment structured? These determinations are typically made by the company's board of directors, which often acts as a proxy voter for the shareholders. Ideally, those pay structures are geared towards company performance: CEOs win or lose while companies win or lose. If that's the setup, then your salary is pretty much justified, i.e. they are paid for the value they bring to businesses. Unfortunately, there are a lot of distortions here too. Stock value is often used as a proxy for other measures of company performance, so the focus of some executives is to manipulate the stock price, rather than creating a good product and competing well in the market ( Does anyone remember Enron?). Twisted performance incentives can also lead to shady corporate accounting and even fraudulent practices (hello again, Enron). The worst, however, is when large corporations achieve and maintain their "success" by securing political favors that allow them to force their competitors or issue large salaries without actually producing anything of value (ahem, Solyndra). I do not believe in the idea that all executives in large companies do not deserve their salaries. I just warn that there are enough bad players on the market,
  • Professional athletes. Of all the examples I give here, professional athletes may actually have salaries that are the closest reflection of their market value. Certainly there are some distortions, for example, different leagues have requirements for a benchmark minimum wage. There are also some significant distortions in the way owners can finance those wages; I have a particular problem with the notion that taxpayers are hooked on building arenas / stadiums in most circumstances. But, if you look at the contract between the player and his employer, there are many market forces at play. See Also - John Nagel's Answer to Why Major League Athletes Make So Much Money

It is mainly due to some of the reasons mentioned below.

  • Selling is an art: selling something to someone is an art. It involves talent, knowledge, experience and individual contacts. Very few people can master all of these qualities. Every organization becomes profitable only thanks to its sales team. If you have a good product but not a good sales team, your product may be doomed. All organizations do their best to keep the best sales team they have or try to recruit the best person available in the market. Along with open competition to sell any product, there will be hidden c
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It is mainly due to some of the reasons mentioned below.

  • Selling is an art: selling something to someone is an art. It involves talent, knowledge, experience and individual contacts. Very few people can master all of these qualities. Every organization becomes profitable only thanks to its sales team. If you have a good product but not a good sales team, your product may be doomed. All organizations do their best to keep the best sales team they have or try to recruit the best person available in the market. Along with open competition to sell any product, there will also be hidden competition to buy from the seller. So finding a good salesperson is not an easy task.
  • It is a demanding job: this is a very demanding job, in which you can succeed or perish. A sales person can sell and meet the goal or get kicked out of the organization. There is no such thing as an average salesperson or survivor. Whereas in any other field, average or even below average performance can survive. Due to the demand for hiring and also the salary or commission involved, many people are attracted to and enter this field. Over time, many of those people lost their way due to the demanding nature of this job. Many salespeople change their fields due to the pressure it caused on individual performance and also on their immediate family, due to the hiring and firing policy of this job.
  • It is exhausting work: just like the way mentioned above, it is not only exhausting on the mind but also on the body of the individual. The job of most salespeople involves traveling from the local to the international arena, depending on the product or organization in which they are involved. Travel affects health or personal / family time. Some prefer to choose health or family over money while changing fields.
  • Cost of the salesperson himself: A good salesperson creates his talent and his contacts. How selling is an art and any art has its own price. The cost of recruitment is high for these people. Most of the organization doesn't have that hiring budget to attract those talents. Which results in many salespeople not applying for those positions where the demand and stress will be the same as in any other sales job, but not the money.


Thanks 4 A2A

Objectively, there is no such thing. It is basic economics. If a job has a high pay and low pressure, a lot of people will want it, so the employer will not have to pay as much and the high salary will turn into a low salary.

What you want to look for is a job that may feel a lot of pressure for most people, but not for you. This can happen if you are doing something that you love to do.

For example, I have a cousin who was an underwater welder. He loved the water and dived (pigeon?) In his spare time. He loved to weld. He enjoyed the job and was paid well because most people are afraid of being underwater.

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Objectively, there is no such thing. It is basic economics. If a job has a high pay and low pressure, a lot of people will want it, so the employer will not have to pay as much and the high salary will turn into a low salary.

What you want to look for is a job that may feel a lot of pressure for most people, but not for you. This can happen if you are doing something that you love to do.

For example, I have a cousin who was an underwater welder. He loved the water and dived (pigeon?) In his spare time. He loved to weld. He enjoyed the job and was paid well because most people are afraid of being underwater using potentially dangerous equipment while working under tons of steel (fixing a ship's hull).

Another example, telephone sales. Most people don't like talking on the phone and they don't like the pressure of setting a quota every day / week / month. But I know someone who, at 25 and without a university, loves to talk to strangers on the phone. She will make almost $ 100k this year selling a million dollars worth of products over the phone and in 3 years she will double that. It would be terribly stressful for me, but she loves it.

Do you love cars? Sell ​​high-end cars. And so on. Find something that you like and that most people hate and you can earn big money without stress.

The old concept that electrical engineers are just "power engineers" is dead.

In fact, the only electric companies that will employ new and inexperienced electors. the graduates of engg are the State Distribution Companies (Discoms), which exist solely for political corruption; his incompetence is staggering.

Serious power companies like Tatas or Reliance (Adani) will expect much more academically qualified candidates.

So anyway, today's electrical engineering is:

Note the title: "Electrical and Systems Engineering".

Berkeley combines EE and Cs.

Same with Georgia Tech.

And the University of Illinois.

AND

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The old concept that electrical engineers are just "power engineers" is dead.

In fact, the only electric companies that will employ new and inexperienced electors. the graduates of engg are the State Distribution Companies (Discoms), which exist solely for political corruption; his incompetence is staggering.

Serious power companies like Tatas or Reliance (Adani) will expect much more academically qualified candidates.

So anyway, today's electrical engineering is:

Note the title: "Electrical and Systems Engineering".

Berkeley combines EE and Cs.

Same with Georgia Tech.

And the University of Illinois.

And these departments now deal a lot with Signals and Systems and Communications.

EE programs today provide students with a strong theoretical and experimental understanding of the underlying principles of hardware and software, ranging from device physics to electronics and medical imaging, embedded systems, and device engineering. control systems.

Students may choose to specialize in any of these areas, as well as others including: electrical power generation and distribution, medical imaging, computer systems, or micro- and nanoscale optical and electronic device design.

These will take you throughout your career.

This is the NEW electrical engineering.

▲ In mid-August it was announced that the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign would be home to two new artificial intelligence institutes, one of which will focus on agriculture. The Illinois Autonomous Farm (IAF), led by Illinois ECE Assistant Professor Girish Chowdhary, Donald Biggar Willet Faculty Member of Agricultural and Biological Engineering (ABE) and Computer Science (CS), will assist the new institute to achieve your goals.

Digital signal processing is the branch of engineering that, in the space of a few decades, has enabled unprecedented levels of interpersonal communication and entertainment on demand. By reworking the principles of electronics, telecommunications, and computing into a unifying paradigm, DSP is at the heart of the digital revolution that brought us CDs, DVDs, MP3 players, mobile phones, and many other devices.

The goal, for students in this course, will be to learn the fundamentals of digital signal processing from scratch. Starting with the basic definition of a discrete-time signal, they work their way through Fourier analysis, filter design, sampling, interpolation, and quantization to build a comprehensive enough DSP toolset to analyze a practical communication system in detail.

Probability in Electrical Engineering?

"The theory of probability is nothing more than common sense reduced to calculation." Pierre-Simon Laplace, 1812.

Not all systems are deterministic. In fact, systems have never been completely deterministic; you just assumed because they were easier to solve.

No more. Today's systems have to deal with errors, reflections, echo, noise, and multipath reception (think mobile phone reception).

Why don't you dive right in?

COM-417 Probability and Advanced Applications

These course notes are from: École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne

What about mathematics?

Oh man. the maths! The Fourier transform, the Laplace transform, the z transform, the fast Fourier transform ... these are just the beginning.

And you better know how to use Matlab.

And the NEW differential equations using Matlab to solve them:

And Python, of course.

It's a whole new world, and it will test and push you!

It will even kill some of you!

This is what electrical engineers at my alma mater do:

They don't want an electrical engineer; they want an engineer!

Not just ISRO, ALL employers will expect this from you!

It all depends on what you have done in the fields of Sales and Marketing during your tenure. If you …

  • worked on the development of marketing, promotion and pricing plans,
  • surveys conducted, data analyzed from surveys and customer feedback,
  • developed strategies to improve profitability, market share and revenue growth,
  • worked with Sales in business development in new markets,
  • worked with design, engineering and research teams in the development of new products,
  • provided training and support to end users, distributors or representatives, and
  • contributed to better visibility and recognition of the company by writing articles on the trade jou
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It all depends on what you have done in the fields of Sales and Marketing during your tenure. If you …

  • worked on the development of marketing, promotion and pricing plans,
  • surveys conducted, data analyzed from surveys and customer feedback,
  • developed strategies to improve profitability, market share and revenue growth,
  • worked with Sales in business development in new markets,
  • worked with design, engineering and research teams in the development of new products,
  • provided training and support to end users, distributors or representatives, and
  • contributed to a better visibility and recognition of the company by writing articles in specialized magazines and participating in trade fairs, etc .;

then your career options are limitless.

Typically, most senior executives in sales and marketing end up as CEOs or presidents. They have a better understanding of technical, administrative and financial matters in addition to Sales and Marketing and are therefore ideal for the highest level in any organization.

A good marketing resume is a combination of creative storytelling and basic technical knowledge in one area (copywriting, graphic design, PPC advertising, SEO, etc.)

For the first piece, when applying for the job, please provide some creative suggestions. If you are an artist, make a mockup of something that is branded. Prove your ability to quickly assimilate your design parameters. If you want to be a writer, show them an example of your writing. Because you don't have a huge marketing portfolio, come to the table with novelty suggestions.

For the second part on a technical skill, ta

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A good marketing resume is a combination of creative storytelling and basic technical knowledge in one area (copywriting, graphic design, PPC advertising, SEO, etc.)

For the first piece, when applying for the job, please provide some creative suggestions. If you are an artist, make a mockup of something that is branded. Prove your ability to quickly assimilate your design parameters. If you want to be a writer, show them an example of your writing. Because you don't have a huge marketing portfolio, come to the table with novelty suggestions.

For the second part on a technical skill, take classes. I made a transition from sales to marketing myself. I did this by boldly taking a nano-degree marketing class, reading tons of marketing blogs, and testing marketing strategies with my own small business. Marketing information is readily available and there is even a wealth of free information. Watch LinkedIn learning, watch Hubspot Academy, read Ontraport blog, read Moz blog, read Crazyegg blog, read hubspot blog.

You can, but you will face competition in a country where there are more applicants for the same position. Marketing has some aspects of psychology that deal with human behavior. If you get a sales job, you can sign up for a diploma in marketing from any polygonal college or technique. This will allow you to become a sales professional or marketing person. In the case of any promotion, you can also have the advantage of being promoted to sales manager or marketing manager.

They are many. Please understand that there is no free lunch.

Every acquaintance who entered the insurance industry 10 or more years ago is making a lot of money. Saving $ 100,000 (after taxes) a year in your retirement account. Understand that earnings are low for the first few years. There is an impressive profit curve. No title needed just the license.

Bid Ticket (price of the product or service) generally equates to a large commission.

Every acquaintance who entered the real estate market at least 10 years ago and continues to work hard makes a lot of money - $ 500,000 plus a year. Look for the high priced active markets, Understan

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They are many. Please understand that there is no free lunch.

Every acquaintance who entered the insurance industry 10 or more years ago is making a lot of money. Saving $ 100,000 (after taxes) a year in your retirement account. Understand that earnings are low for the first few years. There is an impressive profit curve. No title needed just the license.

Bid Ticket (price of the product or service) generally equates to a large commission.

Every acquaintance who entered the real estate market at least 10 years ago and continues to work hard makes a lot of money - $ 500,000 plus a year. Look for active high-priced markets. Understand that earnings are low for the first few years. There is an impressive profit curve. No title needed just the license.

I suggest that you avoid sales of aluminum siding, boats and cars, as their promise is barely kept. Choose a large market product to sell; everyone is a potential customer for insurance; always has been, always has been. The real estate sector is also a strong long-term market; It always has been and always will be.

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