What kinds of first jobs do linguistics students usually get?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Conrad Clay



What kinds of first jobs do linguistics students usually get?

I'm not sure what jobs linguistics students generally find, especially as first jobs fresh out of school, but I can tell you about my own work experience and what I remember from my classmates' graduate plans. I have a BA (2002) and a MA (2008) in linguistics.

My first job after college was in retail; I sold running shoes for about 5 years while thinking about what to do next and preparing to graduate. During my master's program, I realized that while I enjoyed linguistics very much, I didn't see myself doing a PhD or becoming an ESL teacher, which seemed like next month.

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I'm not sure what jobs linguistics students generally find, especially as first jobs fresh out of school, but I can tell you about my own work experience and what I remember from my classmates' graduate plans. I have a BA (2002) and a MA (2008) in linguistics.

My first job after college was in retail; I sold running shoes for about 5 years while thinking about what to do next and preparing to graduate. During my master's program, I realized that while I enjoyed linguistics very much, I didn't see myself doing a PhD or becoming an ESL teacher, which seemed like the next step for most of my fellow students. class. I also got another entry-level job, this time as a receptionist at a nonprofit organization, because I was tired of retail. About a year after finishing my master's degree, I was laid off from my receptionist job and eventually found another entry-level job at a nonprofit organization.

Six years later, I am still working in that nonprofit organization, and as the organization has grown from $ 2 million / year to $ 10 million / year, I too had the opportunity to grow. I've done all kinds of work related to fundraising and marketing: data entry, donor recognition, volunteer management, event planning, grant writing / reporting, marketing writing / editing, and more. I am now a certified Salesforce administrator and am responsible for several of the other platforms we use, as well as fundraising reporting and analytics, nothing that I was qualified for when I was hired in 2009. While none of my responsibilities are directly related to linguistics, I think my education served me well as a roundabout route to a more tech-oriented job. It taught me to analyze data, look for patterns, break big problems into manageable parts,

I am no longer in contact with my fellow Linguistics students, but I remember some of the jobs that some of them had shortly after graduation: food service, answering machine, and retail. Most of my classmates went straight to graduate school and I'm not sure where they ended up next.

I am happy to see young people interested in linguists.
Let me be honest with you, if you really want a good career in linguistics, you may want to consider doing your masters to complement your bachelor's degree in the subject. In any case, here is a list of career opportunities you can explore:

1. Academic teaching and research is a nascent discipline around the world, especially with a lot of ground to cover in machine learning and the role that language plays in programming. But remember that before all the noise of technology there was philosophy. Philosophers and critics of literacy in high demand as

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I am happy to see young people interested in linguists.
Let me be honest with you, if you really want a good career in linguistics, you may want to consider doing your masters to complement your bachelor's degree in the subject. In any case, here is a list of career opportunities you can explore:

1. Academic teaching and research is a nascent discipline around the world, especially with a lot of ground to cover in machine learning and the role that language plays in programming. But remember that before all the noise of technology there was philosophy. In-demand literacy philosophers and critics like Noam Chomsky and Mikhail Bakhtin were linguistics graduates just like you!

2. The rise of information technology has also left enough room for budding linguists. Fields such as natural language processing, speech synthesis and recognition, and language data analysis will be ideal for you if you are an early adopter or just interested in technology.

3. Language specializations have also spread to the medical space with a growing demand for speech therapists and audiologists. Of course, these require specializations, but a specialization in the broader field of linguistics should be a good place to start.

4. One of the most interesting domains of linguistics has to be forensic linguistics. These specialists analyze the communication of threats, suicide notes, emergency calls, trademark disputes, etc. They mostly work with the government and law enforcement agencies.

I'm not sure, but my classmates who graduated three years ago are working in industry as linguists and others in government, while most are doing their PhD. It really depends. For last year's cohort, 20% were dedicated to teaching.

Most of the linguistics majors in my school's program tend to work as speech pathologists. There is a very good market for that.

For me, the experience was incredible.

In my freshman year I entered Stanford University thinking that I wanted to major in biochemical engineering. I was studying chemistry and also signed up for a little introductory linguistics seminar (with Tracy Chou actually!) Taught by one of our assistant professors from the department. I already knew I didn't like chemistry, but that kind of introduction convinced me that I couldn't get through years of chemistry and o-chemistry. On the other hand, I loved my linguistics sem intro. An article, by someone named Lera Boroditsky on psycholinguistics, particularly fas

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For me, the experience was incredible.

In my freshman year I entered Stanford University thinking that I wanted to major in biochemical engineering. I was studying chemistry and also signed up for a little introductory linguistics seminar (with Tracy Chou actually!) Taught by one of our assistant professors from the department. I already knew I didn't like chemistry, but that kind of introduction convinced me that I couldn't get through years of chemistry and o-chemistry. On the other hand, I loved my linguistics sem intro. An article by someone named Lera Boroditsky on psycholinguistics particularly fascinated me. Several studies were discussed that focused on the effect that linguistic conventions (specifically, grammatical gender) could have on the perception of the object, subconsciously. I was captivated.

I signed up for another linguistics class, called Language and Gender, taught by one of the best sociolinguists of our time, Penelope Eckert, next term. In it, Lera Boroditsky came to talk to us, apparently she was a professor in our psychology department and I didn't know it! I spoke to her after her guest lecture, as awkwardly as only a star-blown freshman can be, and she agreed to let me investigate with her. After that, it was practically decided: I would specialize in linguistics.

The core of linguistics is not that bad: we had to take something like 5 of the 7 main classes, including phonetics and phonology, morphology, linguistics 1, syntax, semantics, etc. The syntax was very difficult for me, but I found my best friend (Joachim D) in it, it is worth it.

Although linguistics was a small specialization, our classes were never too small. All of our teachers have done incredible research and were very good teachers. This is an advantage that I think the social sciences and humanities have over engineering departments: our professors are creme de la creme masters. Because they have fewer opportunities to enter the industry, permanent and teaching positions are pretty much the pinnacle of a career as a social scientist. Therefore, universities can be incredibly selective about who they offer positions to, and as students we really benefit.

Linguistics was one of the only departments I knew of that had a "sophomore job" to do, basically a baby version of a senior thesis. It sucked. None of my friends were doing it and it was because of the quarter I was abroad, not that I or any of the other linguistics majors I knew got it on time;)

Some of the other students in the department were a bit strange, but they were all really passionate about what they were doing. We weren't a tight-knit community, nobody got together outside of class.

At Stanford, each department has a separate graduation ceremony. In mine, I was literally the only student to graduate that year, so it was more like a celebration of mine, oddly enough. I didn't tell my parents that it was just me who was graduating and as we ran out of the main ceremony for the entire university, my mother was freaking out, worried that I would be late and not get my diploma. I have to admit I was a bit cocky when I told him not to worry ... My "ceremony" basically consisted of my top advisor in the department toasting me, everyone drinking champagne and getting my diploma. They also had a full lunch, for the 10 of us who were there. Afterwards, I went to the EE ceremony to see my friends.

I liked that linguistics was something that almost everyone is interested in, but sometimes it can get tedious when someone who heard that I studied linguistics asked me:

  1. How many languages ​​did I speak.
  2. What was linguistics Or, what was more annoying, he assumed it was the study of languages.
  3. What was she going to do with him in the future.

Also, almost everyone had a question about some random linguistic question: ("Why does Russian do x?") or less they had nothing to do with it. ("Oh, the relationship between language and thought? So do you know if it's easier to write poetry in Turkish?" Or worse yet, "Psycholinguistics huh? So does that mean you can read my mind? "-> What ?!) So, it was a shame that hardly anyone really knew what linguistics was and instead had the wrong view of the field. The worst people were those who were sure that, by speaking a language, they understood linguistics as a field. You would not do that

I consider myself fortunate that Stanford had one of the best linguistics departments in the country, especially since I came to Stanford with no idea of ​​its existence as a specialty or intention to specialize in it. When all is said and done, I do not regret majoring in Linguistics. I knew there was a good chance I could end up living in a box because of it, but I did it anyway.

Unless you graduate from one of the top ten universities, most degrees have little value in the job market. I mean, you will look better than someone who just graduated from high school, but that doesn't say much. It is?

It is the skills that count. A degree in petroleum engineering is not as valuable as the skills a student acquires by earning the degree. Where else is a student likely to get those skills if not in college? I don't know of any linguistics skills taught to you that puts you in a high-demand position in any company or in government.

If you are worried about your future

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Unless you graduate from one of the top ten universities, most degrees have little value in the job market. I mean, you will look better than someone who just graduated from high school, but that doesn't say much. It is?

It is the skills that count. A degree in petroleum engineering is not as valuable as the skills a student acquires by earning the degree. Where else is a student likely to get those skills if not in college? I don't know of any linguistics skills taught to you that puts you in a high-demand position in any company or in government.

If you are worried about your future, I suggest that you start developing business skills. You can always take the academic route: go for the doctorate; To do investigation; teaching. I imagine there is not a great demand for linguistics teachers, so you will have to go wherever you find work. The advantage is that you can continue to focus on the abstract parts of the language and someone else will pay you for it. It's not a bad deal.

Applying linguistic knowledge more broadly is also a way to go. Learn to speak a language like Farsi, Urdu, Pashto or Arabic and getting a job in the government will not be terribly difficult: the State Department, the CIA, the NSA, take your pick. Learn a language like German, Japanese, Chinese or Korean and it will appeal to companies doing business in those countries.

However, you will also need to develop other skills. For a corporate job, an advertising specialization, business, or sales experience are great combinations with language skills. International relations degrees are nice, but not necessary. If you want to go the government route, look for internships. They often care less about the title and more about their experience (i.e. internships) and skills. Work with an NGO or the Peace Corps if you can't get an internship.

In short, marketable skills are the path to a good career. Don't worry too much about your degree, especially your bachelor's degree. Focus on ways to develop marketable skills to get you the job you want.

It depends a lot on what you mean by "worth it." If you are working towards a PhD in almost any field, the main reason for doing so is that you love and are obsessed with the subject and want to learn all you can about it and eventually add to the field of knowledge. If you want to have an academic job in this field and you want to have it as your career, then it is an absolutely necessary (but not sufficient) step. In that sense, "it's" worth it. If you love the field and want to spend a lot of time learning it in depth and you have a good deal (free ride, stipend, etc.) then you could b

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It depends a lot on what you mean by "worth it." If you are working towards a PhD in almost any field, the main reason for doing so is that you love and are obsessed with the subject and want to learn all you can about it and eventually add to the field of knowledge. If you want to have an academic job in this field and you want to have it as your career, then it is an absolutely necessary (but not sufficient) step. In that sense, "it's" worth it. If you love the field and want to spend a lot of time learning it in depth and you have a good deal (free ride, stipend, etc.) then it could be a very satisfying way to spend 6 years. You will likely be personally changed and enriched by the experience. If you mean "worth it" In the common American way (that is, you will finish it and get a permanent upper-middle-class professional job outside of academia), then the answer is definitely no. But if you can get a permanent job and you like to teach, think, write, research, debate, have really smart colleagues, good benefits and a job for life, then it is "worth it." Of course, tenure in such a field is very difficult to come by, so you better love what you are doing while doing it. good benefits and a job for life, then it is "worth it". Of course, tenure in such a field is very difficult to come by, so you better love what you are doing while doing it. good benefits and a job for life, then it is "worth it". Of course, tenure in such a field is very difficult to come by, so you better love what you are doing while doing it.
I disagree with Nizamova's other answer, if you want to teach a language, then a higher degree in linguistics is a waste of time. Teaching a language is a very different set of skills and interests than higher-level linguistics. Knowing a little about the linguistics of the language you teach can help, but it's a very different matter from that. There is the sub-discipline of applied linguistics, but most programs are much more theoretical and abstract.
If you are interested in linguistics and computer science or neurobiology, there may be non-academic jobs in the future.

One of my proudest moments as a linguistics tutor, when I was still doing my PhD, was when my brightest student in the undergraduate subject I was teaching asked me this question.

I was still doing my PhD, but I was already aware of how few jobs there were. How you had to step on people's bodies and endure 10 years of postdoctoral work to get an academic position. And that's without even considering the academic experience of the USA, where you will end up condemned for life to be a teaching adjunct, because it is more difficult to get an academic job than to be one of Calvin's chosen ones.

And i told him

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One of my proudest moments as a linguistics tutor, when I was still doing my PhD, was when my brightest student in the undergraduate subject I was teaching asked me this question.

I was still doing my PhD, but I was already aware of how few jobs there were. How you had to step on people's bodies and endure 10 years of postdoctoral work to get an academic position. And that's without even considering the academic experience of the USA, where you will end up condemned for life to be a teaching adjunct, because it is more difficult to get an academic job than to be one of Calvin's chosen ones.

And I said to my brightest student: just do a Ph.D. in linguistics, if you can't imagine doing something else.

She thanked me. And I ended up doing psychology instead.

And I work in IT.

And you, OP, you are 15 years old and you are in no condition to make that call. Of course, read about linguistics and take some subjects in college. But, especially if you are in the US, and really, these days, even if you are not (I see you are in Ireland): do not go to a bachelor's degree committed to doing a PhD in linguistics. Of course, take linguistics subjects in its minor, maybe even major in it. Don't commit beyond that. You have a lot to discover, both about yourself and the workforce. And where your passions reside. You can certainly decide that after your Introduction to Linguistics course in your freshman year of college. (Or earlier, going to your library and reading some linguistics textbooks now.)

I would link to the answers I have already written about my experience of not ending up becoming a professional linguist; But I have enough to be depressed these days. My answers are searchable ...

Keep in mind that linguistics has a reputation among art students for being unexpectedly difficult. I think that's true whether I am in a Chomskian or non-Chomskian department: linguistics has much more in common in methodology with the soft sciences than it does with the humanities.

You have to enjoy analyzing things and using computers (for most linguists, using cmoputers is a daily chore).

To anyone thinking of specializing in linguistics, I would suggest a double major ...

linguistics + mathematics

linguistics + computing

linguistics + language / literature

are some suggestions. If that sounds too difficult, then linguistics is certainly not the most important thing to you. You can also choose to combine linguistics with psychology, sociology, archeology, etc., but for archeology and sociology at least, you will tend to work in those fields with the advantage of having a linguistics expert.

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You have to enjoy analyzing things and using computers (for most linguists, using cmoputers is a daily chore).

To anyone thinking of specializing in linguistics, I would suggest a double major ...

linguistics + mathematics

linguistics + computing

linguistics + language / literature

are some suggestions. If that sounds too difficult, then linguistics is certainly not the most important thing to you. You may also choose to combine linguistics with psychology, sociology, archeology, etc., but for archeology and sociology at least, you will tend to work in those fields with the advantage of having a background in linguistics.

Consider how you will use the title after graduation. “Loving the language (s)” is important, but linguists, like most people in their work, cannot do the things they love most of the time. Loving things doesn't always help you find a job, it doesn't pay the bills, it doesn't get grants, and it doesn't necessarily interest anyone else.

If you want to pursue field linguistics or language development, remember that money will be difficult to come by and you may have to spend long periods of your life in a foreign culture. If that doesn't bother you or sounds interesting, linguistics is something you might consider.

In my opinion, linguists who have never studied anything but linguistics are seriously deficient in their skills. Yes, they can analyze language, but they can't do much else. Consider broadening your horizons.

One idea to consider is studying another subject as an undergraduate, but taking linguistics courses as a prerequisite (perhaps as a minor or concentration). Then take a two-year master's degree in linguistics after you have completed your bachelor's degree. You may even be able to start work on a master's degree while you are a college student (summer courses, etc.). I have many linguist friends with a BA in linguistics but a completely different BA.

A few more things: Linguistics is a human science, which means it has scientific components but also complex human dynamics. If you like listening to people and discovering new things about them, and if you are open to changing your previous beliefs based on new information, you can enjoy linguistics. Linguistics is not for closed-minded people, because new theories come up all the time, and if you can't adapt to them, you won't survive.

Linguists can use their craft to serve themselves or to serve others. But if you study other people just to enjoy something for yourself (like getting a job as a college professor), what's the point? I would suggest that linguists see themselves as servants of language communities and of the people in those communities.

If you publish academic writings in linguistics, there are likely to be people who disagree with you, and even criticize you in your writing or in person. Be prepared for that. Linguistics can be a bit fierce. I have read or heard some criticisms like, “Dr. Bartleby claims that this phenomenon occurs in the Tawlikiliki language of Beyond Your Vegonistan, but does not provide supporting evidence, and a simpler analysis shows that phenomenon x does not exist at all. "You may spend years of your life working on something, come up with something that you think brilliant and a smarter linguist can knock down your whole argument in 5 minutes. One of my favorite article titles: “Mirativity” doesn't exist …. This was written in response to linguists who spent years describing the mirativity.

Of course, there are other academic fields like that, and there is also no mandate to publish theoretical papers as a linguist.

If the things I have said make sense to you and seem interesting and challenging, it is good for you to study linguistics. However, you must realize that you will probably have to decide very early in your career what type of work you are going to do: computational, descriptive, etc. Some linguists end up working on various types of translation.

Most linguistics is much more scientific and mathematical than a person who simply "loves language" and wants to study it suspects.

The funny thing is that I never wanted to study Linguistics. Or English. Or Russian.

Why did I do it? Because math: Originally, I was a molecular biology student and was planning to enter the medical field. But because I was 18 and didn't bother to crack the system and get help, I gave up on that idea in my second year.

I sucked a lot in math. I could never understand where the teacher got numbers from when the equation had no numbers. However, for theoretical physics, I had no problems? Basically regular math = no, theoretical math (with many possible solutions) = safe.

I.D

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The funny thing is that I never wanted to study Linguistics. Or English. Or Russian.

Why did I do it? Because math: Originally, I was a molecular biology student and was planning to enter the medical field. But because I was 18 and didn't bother to crack the system and get help, I gave up on that idea in my second year.

I sucked a lot in math. I could never understand where the teacher got numbers from when the equation had no numbers. However, for theoretical physics, I had no problems? Basically regular math = no, theoretical math (with many possible solutions) = safe.

I decided to stick with English as I was pretty good at reading and writing. I loved researching. 15 pages? It is not a problem. He basically lived in the library.

I decided to broaden my horizons, so I took a linguistics course. He kicked my ass.

  1. because I have a hearing problem
  2. because I learned British English, not American English (Russian immigrant)

I remember failing course assignments (online), until the teacher asked me to meet him. Then we found out that ... well, I don't know American English.

Over time, I realized that I had a gift for language and for understanding the system. I studied Latin for 8 years, Spanish (I don't know how long), English ... I speak Russian fluently. I fell a bit in love with all of that. Linguistics is a bit like math. The idea is to get to the root of the problem or find out how you got X. There are formulas and theories, but they are not always concrete. For some of the changes, (if we talk about historical) it is difficult to say how you went from A to B.

I decided to attend a master's program (also because I got scholarships, why not?). My focus was: language, linguistics and literature. Since I love my mother tongue and wanted to learn more about it, my emphasis was on Russian linguistics and literature.

Honestly, this was not ... not what I expected. I loved the historical part. It was fascinating to see where many Slavic languages ​​came from and how they came about. I am not able to read, albeit slowly, and understand Ukrainian, Polish and Belarusian.

Problems: My biggest problem on the field was my hearing. I can't explain this very well. I think that because I have hearing difficulties, I could not identify certain sounds (phonetically) in the tasks. Russian is a complex language. Even if you are a native speaker, you run into major problems in addition to grammar.

Um, I didn't get along with one of my teachers either. I saw him as a very closed-minded person. He strictly believed in the American system, more than in the European system.

"We are in the United States, therefore, we should only go for the American system. If you want to use the European one, for each answer you give me, you must explain, in a paragraph, why you decided on that."

All right, asshole. He was also not fluent in Russian. I think he has been teaching the same classes, in the same way, for the last 30 years. Our books were from the 40s and 50s. Sometimes, starting in the 70s, if we were lucky.

Struggles and Many Tears: Linguistics in graduate school can be overwhelming. For the tests, I needed to memorize more than 20 pages of notes and a lot of formulas. There were times when I needed to write a research paper, but the topic that was given did not have many sources to turn to. He ended up using formulas and other things to help, and he prayed that he was somehow right or that his theory sounded plausible.

It was stressful. There were times when I threw my books against the wall and wanted to burn some notes. However, I am sure that most graduate and PhD candidates go through the same thing.

Results and other things: I was never interested in teaching linguistics; I did not see the need to attend a PhD program. I wanted to teach Russian. But ... to sum it up, that dream was destroyed. With my degrees, experience and background, I am able to work in universities and the United States government, as a translator, linguist, language / international coordinator. I would LOVE to work as an international coordinator or something like that at a university, but the problem is getting into the system. I wish I could knock on the supervisors' door and ask for an interview, but no. Not socially acceptable.

As for the government, I wouldn't mind and I've gotten quite a few interviews. The pay and benefits are excellent. I would know and enjoy what I am doing, up to a point. But there are other factors for me that make the final decision quite difficult as to whether or not I want to be in that system.

Ultimately, there are quite a few careers / opportunities in the field of linguistics. It really depends on what interests you and what your university offers. Your focus on linguistics can greatly reduce your job opportunities. If your field is very specific, then you can only apply for certain jobs.

My most regret is not having an MS (in hearing science or audiology). I guess I could go back to graduate school? I do not know. I've been in school for so long that I want to learn to be a fully functional adult with adult skills.

What am I doing now ?: I have no idea. I am still learning to be an adult.

I don't really know what I want to do. I currently run a business, but this is not what I will do for the rest of my life. I chose this career to, again, expand those horizons. I'm only 25 years old and I'm just starting out. I've never really been out of the academy, so I'm brushing up on those "job skills" that everyone seems to need.

As I said, ultimately my goal is a career in international studies / advisor / study abroad / blah blah. Why? I miss the university environment and I really enjoy working with students. In order to do that, I need to kick my butt. Who knows if I'll end up there.

Whatever happens.

With just a bachelor's degree and nothing else?

Not much, and what there is depends on your subspecialty (whether it's an official part of your degree program or just something you're particularly interested in and take more electives). You might get a job as an editor, but a real English / Editing degree would be just as suitable in most cases. You could become a lexicographer, but those jobs are pretty rare. If you're lucky, someone might sponsor you to do fieldwork, but that's iffy without a masters or PhD, or at least being in a PhD program (where you can

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With just a bachelor's degree and nothing else?

Not much, and what there is depends on your subspecialty (whether it's an official part of your degree program or just something you're particularly interested in and take more electives). You might get a job as an editor, but a real English / Editing degree would be just as suitable in most cases. You could become a lexicographer, but those jobs are pretty rare. If you're lucky, someone might sponsor you to do fieldwork, but that's doubtful without a master's or Ph.D., or at least being in a PhD program (where you could use such fieldwork to earn your Ph.D.).

You could become a dialect coach or language consultant for a theater or film production. You could dedicate yourself to localization and internationalization (l10n and i18n) and end up working in marketing or as a consultant for a technology company. Or you can pursue education and conduct assessments and test design for language learners and teachers.

However, with a higher degree, and especially combined with some other field (either as a minor or a second degree), the opportunities explode. Do you know anything about programming or statistics? You can make a lot of money in NLP, although the competition for those jobs is fierce. Do you know a second language? You could do translation, or even interpreting, and suddenly you look much more desirable for the l10n and i18n jobs, working with your particular target culture. The same goes for having a business or marketing degree. Do you have a PhD? You can become a research professor and it will improve your chances of getting those NLP jobs. And so on.

For most non-linguists, linguistics seems like an exotic subject and also quite mysterious. And people have pretty funny ideas about linguistics too. Sometimes students join a linguistics course with their own ideas and expectations about linguistics and are frustrated, while others enjoy the subject.

There are some things that students wishing to pursue a career in linguistics should be prepared for. They have to give up certain old ideas and notions about languages. They also have to face some hard facts and realities. Are here;

Ideas to quit:

  1. If you have those fun ideas like
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For most non-linguists, linguistics seems like an exotic subject and also quite mysterious. And people have pretty funny ideas about linguistics too. Sometimes students join a linguistics course with their own ideas and expectations about linguistics and are frustrated, while others enjoy the subject.

There are some things that students wishing to pursue a career in linguistics should be prepared for. They have to give up certain old ideas and notions about languages. They also have to face some hard facts and realities. Are here;

Ideas to quit:

  1. If you have funny ideas like 'xxx is the oldest language' or weird notions about the 'origins' of the language, you will be disappointed. Linguistics takes a scientific view on these issues.
  2. Do you think 'French is a beautiful language, but xxx is an ugly language'? Sorry. You will learn things that may not be to your liking.
  3. Any ideas like "They speak poor English in Texas" and "Australians speak English with an accent"? A big no for such notions. Linguistics considers all dialects and languages ​​on an equal footing.
  4. Are you planning to join Linguistics in order to 'improve' your English (sorry, this is what they do in India)? No. If you are a native English speaker, you already speak English just like any other native speaker, and if you are not, then sorry, linguistics does not teach you English, although it gives you very good insights into its structure. .

Well the list can go on. But now the second part.

Facts you will notice:

  1. A career in linguistics with only a degree in linguistics can be a bit difficult. It is always wise to combine it with some other theme.
  2. Linguistics demands your full-time attention and rigorous logical thinking. Be prepared to face challenges.
  3. Lately, linguistics has become something of a garden with multiple paths. Make sure which one to follow and do your best. You will get the benefits.

I assure you that linguistics can be very intellectually satisfying, but at the same time very challenging!

Good luck!

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