What jobs in the UK can I get without a photo ID?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Messiah Bright



What jobs in the UK can I get without a photo ID?

It does not work like that

Employers must verify the immigration status, the right to work, of everyone. Most use passports. It's an easy check.

Verification of the right to work of a job applicant

There are no exceptions, no labor sector where it is not necessary to verify the right to work. Employers may use other means of verification, but that's just as true for any job.

The only way to avoid checks (photo ID or home office database) is to find an untrustworthy employer who breaks the law. And other things like PPE, vacation pay, etc. may be skipped.

I had never heard of such a requirement.

You need to show that you have the right to live and work in the UK, but a photo ID is not necessarily part of that.

Some

The UK does not have any type of mandatory photo ID

I don't drive, so I don't have a driving license.

I am not required to have a passport

I've never had a problem getting jobs or contracts yet.

If you don't have a passport, employment agencies accept other forms of identification, such as utility bills and bank statements. But you will be suspected if you claim that you were born in the UK and do not have a passport but have a foreign accent. Even today's young black and Asian young people who are third generation British have a British accent and have lost their Caribbean and Indian accents. First-generation white Europeans born in the UK speak exactly like white Britons.

Okay, I just hit that Eden-style stage after 4 years of fighting, so here's the skinny one:

Since your question is not specific to which country you are from, what you are studying (it relates to the type of job you are looking for) and whether it is a part time or full time job, I can break things down based on my experience and help you fill in the gaps with any questions you have.

Part time jobs:

  1. Use your university. You will certainly have a tutor at the university. Build a relationship with him and let him know that you are always open to opportunities. Then they will find you.
  2. If the tutor
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Okay, I just hit that Eden-style stage after 4 years of fighting, so here's the skinny one:

Since your question is not specific to which country you are from, what you are studying (it relates to the type of job you are looking for) and whether it is a part time or full time job, I can break things down based on my experience and help you fill in the gaps with any questions you have.

Part time jobs:

  1. Use your university. You will certainly have a tutor at the university. Build a relationship with him and let him know that you are always open to opportunities. Then they will find you.
  2. If your initially assigned tutor doesn't seem very willing to help you with things like that, you can switch to someone you align with better. I did it my first week of college, and that tutor got me two jobs and is supervising my senior thesis. He is not a personal mentor of mine, but he takes care of me and has helped me a lot (but the key is that you keep asking).
  3. Things made, which is a key asset for someone starting out in their career, whether they like it or not, it's hard to sell their unlimited talent and wisdom.

Full-time jobs - This
is where it gets tricky. What angers me the most here is that as international students we have very few options in terms of the number of employers we can work for due to visa sponsorship rules. To a large extent, your hopes depend on very large or very small corporations (startups, etc.). I will explain why below. Http://www.oliverwyman.com/index.html

  1. Large Companies - Generally not a bad place to start your career, large companies are your best option for visa sponsorships. I also used to be a skeptic because I have had great experiences with startups as a student, and I know that I generally prefer a smaller work environment. But it's not impossible to find a great company that will keep you here and still offer a good small business feel (I did: Home)
  2. Start-ups: If you are interested in start-ups, this is a great route. Startups often hire on campus for internships and part-time work (your mentor can help you find one of these roles). Once you join them, if you do well and get along with the team very well (both criteria are very important), there is a chance that they can sponsor you for a visa. My current boss is an example of this. The biggest risks that diverted me from this path were that:

    a) Things can change very suddenly with startups. If the company runs out of money for its sponsorship a month before its student visa expires, it has no other choice. Also, even if things go well and they sponsor you, there is no guarantee that the company will be around for another 2 or 3 years (which is generally what you would expect, or at least I did) and then you '
    b) The cycle decision-making starts too late. Large companies start and end their hiring rounds by February / March at the latest. If you are in your senior year and you miss these rounds relying on your startup and if something goes wrong in the final months of trading, you will be left without backup.

    If you really love the startup environment so much, you can always come back (especially if you have a good relationship, which is always a great strategy). But getting hired at a big company is a great first step because the easiest time to get that experience is often straight out of college (when you're at least sure they'll be hiring, and there's often only one position to apply for) .

Personally, while I am here, I worked on academic research by myself, interned at a small startup, interned at a large technology consulting company and a small and medium-sized private equity company, and now I am joining a company. management consulting. The experience of trying different sizes (and even types / industries) has been invaluable, and I recommend doing the same to decide which of those paths is important to you.

I am in the unfortunate position of applying for jobs while procrastinating and writing this answer. There are hundreds of thousands of jobs available to apply for. I know, I am registered with all job sites and employment agencies within 50 miles of my home.

What bothers me about the recruitment and recruitment process in the UK is the lack of common sense. Your CV is scanned for keywords or worse, run through ATS software that compiles an overview of your experience, skills and gives you a score of 100.

The problem with ATS is that it is complete nonsense. According to ATS, I am

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I am in the unfortunate position of applying for jobs while procrastinating and writing this answer. There are hundreds of thousands of jobs available to apply for. I know, I am registered with all job sites and employment agencies within 50 miles of my home.

What bothers me about the recruitment and recruitment process in the UK is the lack of common sense. Your CV is scanned for keywords or worse, run through ATS software that compiles an overview of your experience, skills and gives you a score of 100.

The problem with ATS is that it is complete nonsense. According to ATS, I am an engineer with some low-level management experience. I am not. I am a designer with more than 20 years of senior management experience. My CV says it very clearly.

And when you find an agency that really bothers to look at the information they send you, it seems unable to find transferable skills.

Perfect example :. I was recently turned down for an office manager job at a small plumbing company. When I asked for feedback, I was informed that I do not have any experience as an office manager in a plumbing company. Fair enough. However, if you bother to look at my CV, you will notice that I have 20 years of senior management experience leading teams in the UK and Northern Europe. Experience of executing a budget of more than $ 8 billion. Experience in managing the Trade Finance office of an international investment bank with an operating budget of £ 93 million. A Ph.D. and advanced computer skills. I think I am capable of running an office of 3 people and 2 mobile plumbers…. But no,

More than one agency has told me that because I do not have CLAIT (a very low level IT certificate), I need to take an IT skills test before registering with them. This is despite the fact that an entire section of my CV is dedicated to my high-level IT qualifications, which include my PhD. But no, I don't have CLAIT, so I have to show that I know what a spreadsheet is and that I know how to print something.

There are tons of jobs out there, but if you want something that pays more than minimum wage, and unless it meets the exact person requirement specified by the client, the chances of outperforming short-sighted recruiters are negligible, in my experience.

When applying for a job in the UK, always check the job posting for the correct way to apply. The usual two ways are with a completed application form (which you will need to request from the company) or with a CV, and applications are often posted, not emailed.

It is not common to send copies of your qualifications, letters of reference, or a photo with the initial application, but do review the job posting carefully.

These documents will be necessary if you get an interview, so keep them in a folder ready to present.

As always, make sure you meet the application deadline and check that you meet all the criteria.

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When applying for a job in the UK, always check the job posting for the correct way to apply. The usual two ways are with a completed application form (which you will need to request from the company) or with a CV, and applications are often posted, not emailed.

It is not common to send copies of your qualifications, letters of reference, or a photo with the initial application, but do review the job posting carefully.

These documents will be necessary if you get an interview, so keep them in a folder ready to present.

As always, make sure you meet the application deadline and verify that you meet all of the job criteria. Tailor your CV and cover letter to show how you check all the boxes and therefore are the best person for the job.

What is a CV?

CV is short for Curriculum Vitae and it is not completely different from a resume in that it is a summary about you. Try to keep it to 1 page or 2 pages maximum. Keep it short and well organized to help the HR team verify your criteria. White space is good on the page, so don't write too much.

If possible, you should tailor your CV for each job application and the best place to do this is in the 'Personal Profile' at the top.

These are the points to include in a standard CV:

  • Name - Font larger than the rest of the text, usually centered at the top.
  • Contact information: address, phone, email, usually centered under your name.
  • Personal profile: short paragraph about you. Write in the first person (I am ...) and use appropriate adjectives (I am a worker, etc.). Don't be silly as no one will read it and then they might miss out on the good in you.
  • Employment History - Most recent at the top. Include company name, title, brief job description, and dates. Consider whether you only need to list the years of your jobs or the months and years. Of course, if there is a gap, you will be asked about this in the interview, so be prepared.
  • Education and Grades - List most recent studies first and include high school grades.
  • Training / Courses - List the appropriate additional training you have taken that did not mean a qualification, a 1-day customer service course.
  • Skills - Optional section, but can include bulleted list of skills such as languages, IT knowledge, driver's license, etc.
  • References - Optional section, but if you have space include the name and contact information of two people willing to give you a reference. References are usually needed for job applications, but adding the details to your CV is not crucial.

You may note that it is not necessary to include your date of birth, citizenship, marital status, but you can include them if you wish.

UK paper size

Please note that standard letter paper in the UK is A4, so print your cover letter and CV on this size of paper.

Presentation letter

Always include a typed cover letter with your application and keep it short and simple. You need three main paragraphs:

  • One reason to write: "I would like to apply for the position of ..."
  • A short paragraph about you. Tell them why you are the best person for the job.
  • Your hopes for the future.

End with a short and courteous conclusion. "Hope to hear from you" may be enough.

How to apply

It can be tempting to send your application in a large plastic folder, thinking that this will mean that it will turn heads. This is probably not the case as your app is likely to separate from the rest of the stack and not come back. If you want to use a wallet, choose an A4-size plastic presentation wallet with a clear front cover. This way, your HR team won't be bothered to open a fancy folder or remove papers from a zip-top bag. When I was working in an office, the first thing I did with applications and shipments was remove all the fancy 'extras' and staple the papers.

Follow-up / Responses

Don't be put off to learn that you are unlikely to receive a response to all of your job applications. In reality, you are unlikely to receive an answer unless you are wanted for an interview. This is simply due to the large number of applications and the additional work and expense that this would incur. I have known larger companies that use a standard postal receipt to let you know that your application has been received and to let you know if you don't hear from them in the next 3 weeks then it has not been successful.

HR departments don't want a follow-up call from every applicant for every vacancy or they would never hang up the phone. Really, don't call them after a week to ask if your letter got there. Make sure it arrives yourself by personally delivering the application or submitting it via Recorded Delivery (must be signed). But with that said, if you're sure you're the right person for the job and it's been a month since the closing date (which you obviously knew about), give them a call. Be clear, polite and don't waste time.

conclusion

It takes time to get through the selection process and get the job started, even if you are selected, so always plan ahead. Employers expect candidates to have to give notice before leaving their current job, so it can take months from when you first saw the ad to the first day at your new job. Remember, it's easier to look for a new job while you're already working, so don't rush into these things. Find the right job for you.

Nagesh hits the spot.

It is extremely difficult and not worth it (the level 2 visa and a salary of 35,000 pounds per year will not even allow you to rent a normal house that you took for granted in India!). To top it off, you will be made to feel (on a daily basis) that you are doing yourself a favor by allowing you to do a job a Brit would have done for twice the salary. Some of my friends stayed in the UK and are sorry.

I applied for my level 2 visa in the UK and got it (I had gone there on a student visa). However, it took me almost a year to reach this level + I could see that the job market was shrinking

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Nagesh hits the spot.

It is extremely difficult and not worth it (the level 2 visa and a salary of 35,000 pounds per year will not even allow you to rent a normal house that you took for granted in India!). To top it off, you will be made to feel (on a daily basis) that you are doing yourself a favor by allowing you to do a job a Brit would have done for twice the salary. Some of my friends stayed in the UK and are sorry.

I applied for my level 2 visa in the UK and got it (I had gone there on a student visa). However, it took me almost a year to reach this level + I could see that the labor market was shrinking dramatically, not only for non-EU citizens (such as Indians), but also for British and EU citizens ( who get 1st and 2nd preference regardless of how qualified the Indian might be)

This was a few years ago; Now, it is much worse, thanks to (a) all the uncertainty of Brexit and because of it (b) the fact that Britain has its fingers sunk in all the wars in the Middle East, resulting in acts of terrorism in the UK (Manchester bombing is the most recent) resulting in (unjustifiably) all residents talking about expelling all immigrants (regardless of the country they come from and how qualified they are).

For the average Briton (including Indians and Africans who live in the UK and now think like them), an uneducated Ugandan refugee, a Nigerian bully who has emigrated to the UK, an educated, hardworking Indian who just wants a good job and a decent life, a Chinese immigrant who wants to work hard, a Nigerian economic immigrant who just wants to work hard in the UK and have a better life, a Syrian doctor who has emigrated to escape all the violence in his country, a person from the Middle East who has come to the UK illegally on a boat risking his life: they are all the same. For them, "They have all come to the UK because the UK is the best, they are all absorbing social security and they are the cause of all the problems in the UK. Throw them out."

(It is not much different from the ruling philosophy in Germany, 1931-43. Read the historical records of that time and you will find a striking similarity of thought to the UK today. I have lived there and you need to experience this to really understand that it is not about sour grapes)

There are many jobs that do not require or receive love.
Such as, but not limited to, marketing, hospitality team (the team that builds the trailers and disassembles them after the race), driver for logistics, logistics, advanced scouting team (team that goes with the cargo to advance the races ), cleaning engineers. Those are just a few that I can think of at the top of my head.

Actually, it is not that difficult to get a job in Formula 1, most teams like very young and inexperienced technicians. Because they can train them in their own way. Go to a local school, earn a degree or certificate of completion

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There are many jobs that do not require or receive love.
Such as, but not limited to, marketing, hospitality team (the team that builds the trailers and disassembles them after the race), driver for logistics, logistics, advanced scouting team (team that goes with the cargo to advance the races ), cleaning engineers. Those are just a few that I can think of at the top of my head.

Actually, it is not that difficult to get a job in Formula 1, most teams like very young and inexperienced technicians. Because they can train them in their own way. Go to a local school, earn a degree or certificate of completion in high-speed vehicles, and apply for the first ever Formula 1 team, which you can apply to. Motorsport.com: F1 News, MotoGP, NASCAR, Rallying and more have jobs for almost every team imaginable.

If you look and are selective, you could find yourself working in Formula 1.

I'll tell you a story, a guy from Kingfisher at the time, who later became Force India, now Aston Martin, offered me a job there on the spot. It was hard not to accept it. At that time he was linked to Honda. And he couldn't let them go.

Will employers in the UK realize the qualifications earned in 2020 and 2021, after all that has been handed to them on a platter?

Damn, I hope they do!

No1 Son has just completed his Bachelor's Degree in Medical Biogenetics.

His available lectures were at 10% of what should have been given. Ten fucking percent !!

He has had to work from home, or from 'Video Conferencing', which he (and I agree) hates for half of his course, which has still cost him the full amount!

He has worked hard as he was terrified of getting a bad grade and having huge debts with nothing to show for it.

Passes were given at 2

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Will employers in the UK realize the qualifications earned in 2020 and 2021, after all that has been handed to them on a platter?

Damn, I hope they do!

No1 Son has just completed his Bachelor's Degree in Medical Biogenetics.

His available lectures were at 10% of what should have been given. Ten fucking percent !!

He has had to work from home, or from 'Video Conferencing', which he (and I agree) hates for half of his course, which has still cost him the full amount!

He has worked hard as he was terrified of getting a bad grade and having huge debts with nothing to show for it.

Passes were granted to 2020 students, but not 2021 graduates because Covid was 'unknown' in 2020, but 'understood' in 2021!

Did you deliver them on a plate? Not for the damn medical students!

(He called me when the results were published. The jerk got a 'First'. It makes me nervous and gets a 'First ...' The only one in his cohort! (Grumble ... moan ..... Young man today ...)

I've been asked to answer this, otherwise I probably wouldn't. OP claims he is a 30 year old British citizen with no prior work experience and has never lived in the UK. I can't really answer about how easy it would be to find a job without asking a few questions.

  1. Language skills? Do you speak English at a reasonable level?
  2. Education? You have reached 30 without work experience. Is it because you have been in advanced higher education or have you been financially inactive?
  3. Other circumstances and experience. It may or may not make a difference.

If they had asked me this

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I've been asked to answer this, otherwise I probably wouldn't. OP claims he is a 30 year old British citizen with no prior work experience and has never lived in the UK. I can't really answer about how easy it would be to find a job without asking a few questions.

  1. Language skills? Do you speak English at a reasonable level?
  2. Education? You have reached 30 without work experience. Is it because you have been in advanced higher education or have you been financially inactive?
  3. Other circumstances and experience. It may or may not make a difference.

If I had been asked this question six months ago, I would have said that anyone who really wants to work will find a job, it may not be the perfect job, honestly, it can even be a horrible job, but you would probably find something. But as current events unfold, as they keep saying, it is unprecedented. If the OP is willing to pick fruit, that would provide them with immediate employment and some experience as well.

If this is your first time visiting the UK, please go online and make sure your tax situation is correct.

It is an enigma. My mother, who is 80 years old and no longer has a license or passport, had the same problem. Basically, do you have something that's a photo ID? Student card, blue badge, union membership, etc., etc.

If not, you have to go back to the address they need and tell them you don't have a photo ID, and ask what they will take instead. I can tell you from experience that at first they will say they can't take anything else, but if you honestly don't have a photo ID then just keep your position and offer other forms of ID instead.

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