What jobs can you get as a very young self-taught programmer?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Macie Curtis



What jobs can you get as a very young self-taught programmer?

I have to admit that I don't find many of the optimistic answers here plausible. If you have a computer science degree (with at least a certain GPA), then I have some confidence that you have been exposed to various programming concepts, even if you may not be able to use them yet. If you are self-taught and experienced, I can call your previous employers and verify what you know, or at least take a look at what you have posted on github or similar.

But if you don't have any, why should I hire you?

Given the ubiquity of open source software, gaining experience is not a problem. Becoming

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I have to admit that I don't find many of the optimistic answers here plausible. If you have a computer science degree (with at least a certain GPA), then I have some confidence that you have been exposed to various programming concepts, even if you may not be able to use them yet. If you are self-taught and experienced, I can call your previous employers and verify what you know, or at least take a look at what you have posted on github or similar.

But if you don't have any, why should I hire you?

Given the ubiquity of open source software, gaining experience is not a problem. Becoming a constant contributor to big, well-known projects should be your goal. Working on individual projects is a good way to get there, but I'll be more impressed if (say) the Debian community has looked at your work.

Keep learning for yourself ... then you can find a Junior Software Developer job.

For example, I am a self-taught programmer, and after a year and a half preparing and studying on my own, I found a job as Junior Software Developer .NET, and now I am working there.

The important thing is ... if you do what you do because you love it, sooner or later someone will give you a chance.

Fight for what you want! ;) Do
n't let people tell you you can't do it! Believe in yourself!

I'm a self-taught programmer, so I'll tell you how I did it.

First of all, I don't think anyone will hire someone without experience. So that's the key. You need experience.

He was working a job where we hired a programmer to do something, and we weren't happy with his job. Somehow I convinced my boss that I could do a better job than the guy we hired. Then I opened several books and taught myself Fortran (this was back then) and also took a systems programming class. Then I succeeded in replacing the programmer we hired and continued writing programs for at least 5 more years.

Keep reading

I'm a self-taught programmer, so I'll tell you how I did it.

First of all, I don't think anyone will hire someone without experience. So that's the key. You need experience.

He was working a job where we hired a programmer to do something, and we weren't happy with his job. Somehow I convinced my boss that I could do a better job than the guy we hired. Then I opened several books and taught myself Fortran (this was back then) and also took a systems programming class. Then I succeeded in replacing the programmer we hired and continued writing programs for at least 5 more years.

These days, there are many ways to take online classes to learn how to code.

The key is experience. If you can't code in your current job, take classes and take part in programming challenges, or something you can later point to as proof that you really can code.

The day I quit my job and got a job as a "real" programmer was really scary. I wasn't sure I could do it, but I did, and the rest is history.

Clearly, you cannot be hired without training or experience. So get both, and best of luck.

Not having a degree in computer science will not be a problem.

Being self-taught will work hugely in your favor because as a programmer you are most likely coding independently / alone most of the time, unless you work somewhere that does pair programming, in which case you will be paired with someone. . can learn, so there are really no downsides to this equation.

Employers will appreciate the fact that you took the initiative to learn to code yourself, as it shows that they won't need to empower / motivate you to get the job done.

Regardless of how you learn to code, either

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Not having a degree in computer science will not be a problem.

Being self-taught will work hugely in your favor because as a programmer you are most likely coding independently / alone most of the time, unless you work somewhere that does pair programming, in which case you will be paired with someone. . can learn, so there are really no downsides to this equation.

Employers will appreciate the fact that you took the initiative to learn to code yourself, as it shows that they won't need to empower / motivate you to get the job done.

Regardless of how you learn programming, be it through a college degree, books, or online tutorials, the thing about programming is that you never stop learning. Programming languages ​​develop and evolve, and each project presents a unique combination of requirements and challenges, so self-study skills will be invaluable throughout your career.

So all you need to do is write your CV in a way that reflects those strengths (because they will really be an asset to any company) and then apply for those junior-level jobs.

Nobody cares about the title.

As far as experience goes, you can find some open source project to start with, and once you have it, you can include it in your CV for entry-level job. Also, if you have code on github that looks good, that will fix any experience issues.

Since you don't have the title, try to get some experience first. Modern programmers have many opportunities these days to gain experience without going through traditional HR and college degree checks. Try working as a freelancer (there are some websites that make this easy, like odesk or elance) or ask your friends if they have any small websites they need to create. You can also try contributing to open source projects or creating your own software project / tool that you can launch online for free or try to sell. You can also try developing an application for iOS or Android.

Once you have

Keep reading

Since you don't have the title, try to get some experience first. Modern programmers have many opportunities these days to gain experience without going through traditional HR and college degree checks. Try working as a freelancer (there are some websites that make this easy, like odesk or elance) or ask your friends if they have any small websites they need to create. You can also try contributing to open source projects or creating your own software project / tool that you can launch online for free or try to sell. You can also try developing an application for iOS or Android.

Once you have a reasonable amount of experience, let's say you have an application or software with a moderate following, or are a recognized contributor to an open source project, there will be companies willing to look beyond the lack of title. The best software companies will know not to be strict about the requirements of a relevant degree (I should know, my degree is in Electronic and Communications Engineering, but I have always worked as a software developer).

I found a guy on Craigslist who ran a one-man web development company. He paid me $ 12 an hour. to do simple development while helping me learn PHP and MySQL. That was a year ago, now I make $ 40 an hour. with a different company. In fact, we became great friends and I respect him very much as my mentor.

Most of the successful programmers I know personally are self-taught.

You can get great entry-level jobs. I have met many people who have done this. The pay won't be great, but it's just getting started, so you shouldn't expect anything else.

The trick is to keep growing and perfecting your craft as a web developer. That is the key to getting better jobs and better wages.

Don't let anyone tell you that you can't get a job. You are wrong.

You can do it!

Let me tell you a much better approach. Learn what you learn, learn to solve a problem that affects many people. Try creating a mobile app for eg. which will be used by many users to solve their problem.

Learn about the technologies involved in it. Try to find a good design. Learn everything for yourself. In the end, if you are successful, you will have a successful startup in the making, otherwise you would be employable at least in multiple startups.

Trust me, troubleshooting is more important than a bunch of learned tech for nothing, but I can get a job done.

Keep going and never stop learning. You can find everything you need on the Internet or in books, the only thing you really need is a passion for programming and a real pure interest. Companies don't hire people just for their title, they hire for knowledge. So if you have knowledge, it doesn't matter where you got it from. :)

Everybody starts somewhere. Good employers recognize this and look for attributes unrelated to experience in a candidate. They should hire at a variety of levels.

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