What job will keep you in better physical shape?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Ismael Summers



What job will keep you in better physical shape?

Big question! We all get the same thing 24 hours a day, so if your fitness is a priority (which it should be) and you want / need to work, why not combine them?

The answer is not that simple. I mean, there are THOUSANDS of jobs that can keep you modestly in shape. The MOST fit? Probably a Navy Seal! Or any number of professional athletic endeavors. You would have to think that professional football is the best option for that industry. Dancers Dancers must be very fit to do their job.

You could be a park ranger, but to be really fit, you would need to do some more intense cardio and weight lifting at least a couple of times a week. Same

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Big question! We all get the same thing 24 hours a day, so if your fitness is a priority (which it should be) and you want / need to work, why not combine them?

The answer is not that simple. I mean, there are THOUSANDS of jobs that can keep you modestly in shape. The MOST fit? Probably a Navy Seal! Or any number of professional athletic endeavors. You would have to think that professional football is the best option for that industry. Dancers Dancers must be very fit to do their job.

You could be a park ranger, but to be really fit, you would need to do some more intense cardio and weight lifting at least a couple of times a week. The same goes for any job that keeps you on the go all day: sales, retail, nursing. But none of them will keep you in shape on their own, and if you overeat and don't get enough sleep and eat too much processed food and too much sugar, even dancing or soccer won't keep you as fit as you'd like to be. .

The work environment is also essential. Spending all day on an oil rig pulling steel or working in a mine is going to burn a lot of calories, keep your heart rate high, and probably keep you in good shape, but the polluted air, toxic chemicals, and high risk of injury typical of Those environments are going to negate some or all of the potential fitness benefits.

If you don't want to supplement with the gym or other focused fitness efforts and get all your cardio and strength training on the job, you will have to be in a job that is physically demanding and still in a healthy environment. .

Don't forget mental health too. Nurses spend 12-hour shifts standing, pushing equipment, lifting and moving injured people and body parts - it's an exercise and a long shift. But he is also in a difficult environment, with a lot of emotional stress, physical anguish and many times working at night. It's a growing part of the economy and it pays well, but you'll want to make sure you tackle your mental health on the go, just like any other career.

Tennis coach? Extreme sports competitor? Cross-country ski instructor / guide? Mountaineering guide? Worker? There are many ways to stay active and fit, but only if supplemented by a good diet, adequate rest, mental emotional fitness, stress management, and any component of your fitness that work does not offer.

Ultimately, what I like about the question is that, in essence, it should remind all of us to think about the broader impact of our work, and that our health is critical to our well-being, our productivity, and indeed all other aspects of our life. lives, so whatever career we pursue, make sure that you, too, maintain an acceptable level of fitness and health in that endeavor, or it may be worth looking for other options.

Good luck.

Possibly a desk job in addition to going to the gym. The problem with physical work is that while they generally try to hire people who are capable of it, you have to do it no matter how you feel, this wears out your body. If you go to the gym you can work at your own pace and avoid injuring yourself.

Also, if you do hard physical work, it is easier to associate exercise with work than with play. My grandfather and my husband's great-uncle worked as a radio engineer, which involved climbing towers, and a power line installer, respectively. Neither of us was in shape in retirement. My father had a desk job and he is much m

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Possibly a desk job in addition to going to the gym. The problem with physical work is that while they generally try to hire people who are capable of it, you have to do it no matter how you feel, this wears out your body. If you go to the gym you can work at your own pace and avoid injuring yourself.

Also, if you do hard physical work, it is easier to associate exercise with work than with play. My grandfather and my husband's great-uncle worked as a radio engineer, which involved climbing towers, and a power line installer, respectively. Neither of us was in shape in retirement. My father had a desk job and he is much more so.

If I had one piece of advice for any young man it is to get a desk job or one that is nice to the body. Sometimes physical exchanges pay a lot (which is why I do it) but it comes at a cost. And if you really want to do it to make good money, have a plan to do it in your 30s. I can work and function, but at 39 my hips, shoulder, and back have some issues, so I'm working on my exit plan right now. I will do it for a maximum of another 2 years. Viewing exercise as a medicine, it is much better to be able to control the dosage. It is better to sit at a desk and go to the gym for an hour after work than to have a lot of work.

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If I had one piece of advice for any young man it is to get a desk job or one that is nice to the body. Sometimes physical exchanges pay a lot (which is why I do it) but it comes at a cost. And if you really want to do it to make good money, have a plan to do it in your 30s. I can work and function, but at 39 my hips, shoulder, and back have some issues, so I'm working on my exit plan right now. I will do it for a maximum of another 2 years. Viewing exercise as a medicine, it is much better to be able to control the dosage. It's better to sit at a desk and hit the gym for an hour after work than to carry heavy objects all day at poor angles.

Join us in the military. We will get you in shape.

Mandatory training every morning and sometimes in the afternoon as well.

Fitness test to make sure you are fit.

Height and weight measurements to make sure you are healthy.

Depending on your branch and job, you could see even more intense training.

Hello, a couple of things I should point out. If we are talking about the US armed forces, as I am going to assume you are, then if you are already 30 years old and have no prior military service, then you are already too old to join the Marine Corps. The age limit for enlisting in the US Marine Corps is 28. In fact, at 30 he is too old for any other branch of the military except three. Those would be the US Army and the US Navy and the US Air Force. The age cutoff of in ...

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It's because of what happens if you're not in top shape.

When I served with the Croats in Bosnia, we could only do physical exercises when we were not in the front line. Participation was completely voluntary. Nobody told you if you should go to a bar and drink like a fool or do a 15km cross country run.

Most of our guys did both: run and push-ups during the day and get drunk at night. There were only a few soldiers who did not play any sports, but most served in our logistics unit.

In my platoon, there was only one guy who didn't train, another German. Drank and smoked

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It's because of what happens if you're not in top shape.

When I served with the Croats in Bosnia, we could only do physical exercises when we were not in the front line. Participation was completely voluntary. Nobody told you if you should go to a bar and drink like a fool or do a 15km cross country run.

Most of our guys did both: run and push-ups during the day and get drunk at night. There were only a few soldiers who did not play any sports, but most served in our logistics unit.

In my platoon, there was only one guy who didn't train, another German. He drank and smoked a lot and was in very bad shape.

Some boys from our brigade during an operation in the mountains (photo: 1.Gbr HVO).

During a major offensive operation, our unit had to walk through the mountains of central Bosnia for several days. It rained all the time, food was scarce and we had very heavy backpacks to carry.

To make matters worse, the Croats often called us on the radio and told us to hurry up: all the other units (moving on asphalt roads) were in front of us, even the logistics!

This meant that we were almost running to reach our goal. For two days, nothing happened, but on the third day, our second German suddenly stopped and declared: “I am dead! I can't go on anymore! "

My platoon commander ordered us to take his backpack and distribute its contents. One guy took ammunition, the other food and water, and a third his grenades. This put even more weight on everyone.

As this 'distribution exercise' had cost us valuable time, we had to hurry even more. After half an hour, our German stopped again, this time forever.

We couldn't leave the guy alone and therefore two soldiers were ordered to stay with him while the rest of us continued our march through the mountains.

We arrived hopelessly late and with little strength and, after reporting what had happened, our battalion ordered us to abort the mission.

It was a complete disaster, just because a man was not in good physical shape.

I don't know if this still happens today, but my first enlistment was USNR… my second was USN. To this day I don't really understand why this was the case. I deployed on an aircraft carrier like any other sailor ... or airdale in my case. There was no difference in my position as a member of the US military, except for an additional "R" on my license and earnings statements.

There are reservists, whose job it is to train and be prepared to be activated in times of need by the Navy. I spent a year or more drilling with them after I broke up, mainly because I missed the camaraderie. I stopped drilling to chase ac

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I don't know if this still happens today, but my first enlistment was USNR… my second was USN. To this day I don't really understand why this was the case. I deployed on an aircraft carrier like any other sailor ... or airdale in my case. There was no difference in my position as a member of the US military, except for an additional "R" on my license and earnings statements.

There are reservists, whose job it is to train and be prepared to be activated in times of need by the Navy. I spent a year or more drilling with them after I broke up, mainly because I missed the camaraderie. I stopped drilling to get a college degree. Oddly enough, reservists really aren't ready for the real thing, often requiring significant supervision to perform simple tasks. Well, simple for me, I did the job for 8 years, the TAR guys left very early when I was around, they knew I had a covered shift. I think the goal was to maintain a certain level of familiarity ... which shortens the job training required when shit really hits the fan.

I forgot to answer the question ... as a reservist ... I mean, weekend warrior, which is what I think you're talking about, you report to your drilling site one weekend a month, plus a commitment of a Once a year 2 weeks, where you are basically active duty for 2 weeks. The one-month weekend is typically local, while the 2-week deal can take you to some exotic places ... it just depends on what's going on. Hopefully, you have a military-friendly employer that will allow you to do 2 weeks of drills and basically exchange checks. You give them the military check, they pay you your regular salary. You can also use vacation time, but it is best when you stay with your vacation and the company is willing to fulfill its civic duty.

You always have the potential to mobilize. This is the true essence of being a reservist, you are telling the United States government that you are willing to drop everything to do your part in defending our nation. Once mobilized, you are on active duty and they will release you whenever they want. Again, some employers do check exchange in this situation, but they are required by law to keep your job while you are deployed. It's usually easier when you know your employer's position on it.

This is a tremendously subjective question, as everyone has a different opinion on "aesthetic physique".

If you mean building huge muscles, do activities that involve lifting, making sure to target your chest, back, biceps, and abs.

If you mean doing lean and defined look-Do activities using your own body weight for resistance, like rock climbing or martial arts.

Regardless of how you define "aesthetic physique," you should almost always consider using "muscle confusion," the concept that the more you do an exercise, the easier it becomes. So try to mix things up a bit.

And aesthetics almost always means

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This is a tremendously subjective question, as everyone has a different opinion on "aesthetic physique".

If you mean building huge muscles, do activities that involve lifting, making sure to target your chest, back, biceps, and abs.

If you mean doing lean and defined look-Do activities using your own body weight for resistance, like rock climbing or martial arts.

Regardless of how you define "aesthetic physique," you should almost always consider using "muscle confusion," the concept that the more you do an exercise, the easier it becomes. So try to mix things up a bit.

And aesthetics almost always means having decent abs, so when you exercise, remember to do abdominal exercises and try to eliminate unnecessary sugars from your diet.

There are tons of diet options, but if you are looking to get in shape, you would eliminate soda from your diet immediately and consider finding a sustainable nutritional option for the body type you want.

Love what you do and you will never work a day in your life. At least that's what I like to say. Personally, I love cars and engineering, so I chose 91B, Light Wheeled Vehicle Mechanic. I find that to be the easiest thing to do, and I signed up for additional education in that job. It all depends not on what sucks the least, but on what you like to do the most. But keep this in mind, just because the job is easy doesn't mean the rest of your career won't be.

You can find an easy MOS, like water supply or filtration, but it can be attached to a ranger or SF battalion. Which means you'll be doing ra

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Love what you do and you will never work a day in your life. At least that's what I like to say. Personally, I love cars and engineering, so I chose 91B, Light Wheeled Vehicle Mechanic. I find that to be the easiest thing to do, and I signed up for additional education in that job. It all depends not on what sucks the least, but on what you like to do the most. But keep this in mind, just because the job is easy doesn't mean the rest of your career won't be.

You can find an easy MOS, like water supply or filtration, but it can be attached to a ranger or SF battalion. Which means you'll be doing ranger stuff with the rest of your friends, even if that's not what you signed up for. Heck, it might not even do its job. I know infantry guys who have really lazy leadership that doesn't force them to do anything, I know those who push the pencil who have to go to sleep in the field 3 days a week, I know mechanics who haven't turned a key in your mountain. division unit, etc.

Example: In basic training, I met a drill sergeant who originally entered as 42A (Human Resources), but was attached to a ranger battalion and deployed 3 times. He earned his ranger token, and being pushed through all of that is what made him sign up to become a drill sergeant.

Thanks for your question.

Yes!!!

Why?

The world we live in is drawn to physical appearance more than anything else. Like it or not, other traits are always secondary. So no matter what I believe and how important it is to me, people will judge me and you by our appearance. I know that it is not easy to accept that as fact, but this is the reality and the reality is that it is important.

Being in good physical shape is a useful tool in today's society because fit and attractive people seem to be smart, strong, funny, and kind. Generally, if you can take care of your body and know how, others will trust

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Thanks for your question.

Yes!!!

Why?

The world we live in is drawn to physical appearance more than anything else. Like it or not, other traits are always secondary. So no matter what I believe and how important it is to me, people will judge me and you by our appearance. I know that it is not easy to accept that as fact, but this is the reality and the reality is that it is important.

Being in good physical shape is a useful tool in today's society because fit and attractive people seem to be smart, strong, funny, and kind. Generally, if you can take care of your body and know how, others will trust your knowledge and believe that you know what it takes to help them, which is one of the most important leadership qualities.

I hope this helps.

Dr. Goran Poleksic

This reminds me of an episode of "Just Shoot Me" in the late 90's. Look it up. Maya challenged the staff to choose between an attractive guy and one who was clearly a better fit for the job.

Do you think fitness is a good or comparable measure of success? At best, it is a parallel model. If you are in shape, you will have more energy, but that does not make you more likely to be successful. There are many other metrics.

Go to the gym, run, bike, kayak. Do all of those things and then go back to your work and do your best. And if you think your exercise regimen is what makes you happy, that's fine.

But nothing has a

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This reminds me of an episode of "Just Shoot Me" in the late 90's. Look it up. Maya challenged the staff to choose between an attractive guy and one who was clearly a better fit for the job.

Do you think fitness is a good or comparable measure of success? At best, it is a parallel model. If you are in shape, you will have more energy, but that does not make you more likely to be successful. There are many other metrics.

Go to the gym, run, bike, kayak. Do all of those things and then go back to your work and do your best. And if you think your exercise regimen is what makes you happy, that's fine.

But it has nothing to do with the other.

Nay. Quora is choking on this nonsense.

Arctic oil rig welding and maintenance technician.

You work here in freezing temperatures away from family, friends and civilization:

You have to wear an uncomfortable, heavy and very uncomfortable “uniform”.

Your daily commute begins like this:

And it continues like this:

So you get to this:

Then you turn the lights on to this:

So your day job is in a very uncomfortable suit, underwater in subzero temperatures in pitch black and you have to be resourceful to weld, fix or maintain what you are supposed to do that day.

The pressure is deadly, the visibility is poor, the work

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Arctic oil rig welding and maintenance technician.

You work here in freezing temperatures away from family, friends and civilization:

You have to wear an uncomfortable, heavy and very uncomfortable “uniform”.

Your daily commute begins like this:

And it continues like this:

So you get to this:

Then you turn the lights on to this:

So your day job is in a very uncomfortable suit, underwater in subzero temperatures in pitch black and you have to be resourceful to weld, fix or maintain what you are supposed to do that day.

The pressure is deadly, the visibility is poor, the work is heavy and difficult, the tides can tear you apart at any moment if it is not secured, there is no itch, there is no need to go to the bathroom, do not call a friend if something goes wrong.

Any mistake, lack of judgment or preparation can mean extreme discomfort, injury or death.

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