What job can a foreigner have in Germany?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Victoria Booth



What job can a foreigner have in Germany?

Foreigners must apply for a job applicant visa that requires a college degree, among other requirements. It allows you to look for work and work for 6 months. Thereafter, if you have obtained legal employment in Germany, you are eligible for a German work visa or a Germany work permit and will be allowed to work and live in Germany.

Or you can apply for an employment visa for Germany if you work in a highly specialized area / encounter a shortage of German skills or are sponsored by a German company.

EU citizens and select developed countries (Canada, Australia, Japan, New Zealand, South Korea, Israel and Switzerland

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Foreigners must apply for a job applicant visa that requires a college degree, among other requirements. It allows you to look for work and work for 6 months. Thereafter, if you have obtained legal employment in Germany, you are eligible for a German work visa or a Germany work permit and will be allowed to work and live in Germany.

Or you can apply for an employment visa for Germany if you work in a highly specialized area / encounter a shortage of German skills or are sponsored by a German company.

Citizens of the EU and certain developed countries (Canada, Australia, Japan, New Zealand, South Korea, Israel and Switzerland) can apply for a "residence permit" for work reasons after entering Germany without a visa. All other nationalities must apply for a visa.

After obtaining the required visa, your chances of getting a job depend on:

  • your occupation,
  • the German labor market / employment rate,
  • Be realistic and accept that, as in other countries, preference is given to German applicants with German qualifications. Which is fair, as employers have an obligation to hire their own citizens or permanent residents to ensure a favorable domestic labor market; and you will have no concerns about language ability / cultural adaptation (which are concerns with foreigners).
  • Your level of proficiency in German! You need to be fluent in or around him to be competitive with German applicants, unless you want to clean the toilets. Englisch ist nicht genug!

It belongs to several aspects and each case is individual, but in general it can be said:

  • If you are an EU citizen, you can. Each residential in the EU could work in other EU member countries
  • If you are an asylum seeker / refugee, no you cannot, you must get the green light from the administration to work. If a company wants to hire you, it is requesting that
  • If a company in Germany wants to hire you and you are from outside the EU, there are some formalities to do, but in general it is fine with more or less hazzle (German bureaucracy)
  • If you want to move from outside the EU to Germany
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It belongs to several aspects and each case is individual, but in general it can be said:

  • If you are an EU citizen, you can. Each residential in the EU could work in other EU member countries
  • If you are an asylum seeker / refugee, no you cannot, you must get the green light from the administration to work. If a company wants to hire you, it is requesting that
  • If a company in Germany wants to hire you and you are from outside the EU, there are some formalities to do, but in general it is fine with more or less hazzle (German bureaucracy)
  • If you want to move from outside the EU to Germany and then look for work, that should not be possible; if you are here as a tourist you can apply for a job and if you get a job please refer to the previous step.

Disclaimer: Based on private knowledge, there can be many individual differences and legal issues to consider, so there is no guarantee that it is 100% accurate.

Most of the jobs you can get as a foreigner in Germany are low paying unskilled jobs like cleaning, production, warehouse or kitchen helper etc. And even for these jobs there is also very high competition, like 10 people competing for one of those low paying unskilled jobs. The German job market is almost always saturated with candidates at almost all job levels. Even for the lower paying unskilled jobs, they also want to land the perfect candidate, who should be smart like Einstein and physically as strong as a Tarzan.

No applicant is disqualified simply because of their nationality. Many EU citizens can work as plumbers, cleaners, construction workers, etc. Professionals from outside the EU (= white collar) must have a minimum annual salary of € 44,000 for Aufenthaltserlaubnis (residence permit). It may be that this figure is lower now.

The labor market is gradually opening up to foreigners due to staff shortages in almost all lines of work. It's just that many jobs require knowledge of German. Therefore, schools that teach German do a great business.

It might be easier to help if the other asked the question

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No applicant is disqualified simply because of their nationality. Many EU citizens can work as plumbers, cleaners, construction workers, etc. Professionals from outside the EU (= white collar) must have a minimum annual salary of € 44,000 for Aufenthaltserlaubnis (residence permit). It may be that this figure is lower now.

The labor market is gradually opening up to foreigners due to staff shortages in almost all lines of work. It's just that many jobs require knowledge of German. Therefore, schools that teach German do a great business.

It might be easier to help if you ask the question backwards: what skills do I need / are in demand in Germany?

Best of luck.

I have several Indian friends who recently got a job in Germany. From internship (university) to dentist.

For example, my company is very multinational. (The only "lost" continent is South America).

But it is not always easy. Without a decent qualification, the visa process will be a problem. Dabbawala jobs are only for uneducated locals. Germany does not need more uneducated people.

There are two things to consider:

  1. Do you need a work visa or not?

European citizens do not need a visa, for example.

  1. You speak German?

You will need both to find a "general" job. If you have a unique skill that is hard to find elsewhere, you may have a higher chance of finding a job.

I think the link link I am pasting would be very helpful for people trying to get a job in Germany ...
Jobs in Germany - The Local

If it is. The idea that if you speak German you will find work is a myth that Germany sells when they want to attract foreign students. International Higher Education is Big Business: $ 1.9 Trillion The Global Higher Education Market of $ 1.9 Trillion | Technology and learning

And increasingly, as the state cuts or redirects funding, universities are competing for it.

Germany has three conflicting forces at play:

  1. universities want students for the funds they contribute (many courses charge tuition and there is a measure to charge all students from outside the EU); university professors, especially early in their careers, need
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If it is. The idea that if you speak German you will find work is a myth that Germany sells when they want to attract foreign students. International Higher Education is Big Business: $ 1.9 Trillion The Global Higher Education Market of $ 1.9 Trillion | Technology and learning

And increasingly, as the state cuts or redirects funding, universities are competing for it.

Germany has three conflicting forces at play:

  1. universities want students for the funds they contribute (many courses charge tuition and there is a measure to charge all students from outside the EU); University professors, especially early in their careers, need to “internationalize” courses to obtain state funding. They need to get that coveted “passerby” (official) status that comes with tenure, a much more complicated business than in the US or Canada. If you are considering a graduate school in Germany
  2. the economy needs an endless supply of cheap labor and international students have to submit 8,000 euros a year. Visa restrictions mean that you will spend some of it here, in addition to working a mini job, thus becoming a net gain for the economy.
  3. the population is quite xenophobic (not the whole world, but a politically significant minority) and that is why it does not want immigrants, especially immigrants from outside the EU.

How does Germany overcome this? To attract international students, they sell the "Make it in Germany!" Myth, but it puts many barriers to your job search. The truth is that German entrepreneurs, especially SMEs, are not interested in immigrants from outside the EU, even if they speak German.

The German state wants me to go back and transfer technology. This is obvious if you look at the alumni site Home. The focus is on those who have returned and have ties to Germany.

When Germans talk to me about technology transfer and that I have a moral obligation to come back to help my people, I want to punch them in their red and smug faces, or buy them a one-way ticket to my country so they can do technology. transfer. Believe me, the first option is much better.

These disgusting hypocrites don't give a damn about my country, they just want my dark ass off German soil ASAP. They can't say that openly, so they chatter about how they are training inferior humans so that we can remake our countries to be Germany.

If Germany really needed immigrants, they would make the job search easier by granting open work permits and allowing permanent residence based on a number of factors, including knowledge of German. Actually, if you studied here, unless you get that elusive engineering job in your own specialty, in a year and a half, you'll have to go back to your hometown.

If you are not educated in Germany, don't be fooled by the job applicant visa myth. That's another scam: you bring your own money to Germany and spend it on a fruitless job search. You are not allowed to accept even a minor job in it.

If you really want to come, get a job offer first and then relocate.

The IT job market in Germany is currently doing well. There is a skills shortage in the IT job market, as the growth of the IT industry in the EU has been far greater than the number of professionals with the skills required for the industry. So this has led EU countries to relax visa rules for IT professionals from outside the EU.

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Let's understand the job market first.

If taken in the right perspective, the German job market is already open to IT professionals across Europe. Therefore, the demand for non-EU professionals in Germany is currently for highly qualified IT professionals with

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The IT job market in Germany is currently doing well. There is a skills shortage in the IT job market, as the growth of the IT industry in the EU has been far greater than the number of professionals with the skills required for the industry. So this has led EU countries to relax visa rules for IT professionals from outside the EU.

—————————-

Let's understand the job market first.

If taken in the right perspective, the German job market is already open to IT professionals across Europe. Therefore, the demand for non-EU professionals in Germany is currently for highly skilled IT professionals with industry-specific SKILLS. The demand is not so much for

a. IT professionals with commonly available skills

B. For someone who only has a degree in Computer Science and IT. It doesn't matter if you belong to an Ivy League institute of technology.

I hear HR professionals in my circle often complain about hundreds of applications for commonly available skills positions on the market.

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It would be useless to mention the TOP companies, as the shortage of IT professionals depends on the shortage of skills in the market and not the shortage of people in a company. Therefore, currently the shortage of professionals is predominantly in the fields of SAP, PLM, AI, ML, Unity, Unreal and Data Science.

It is also important to learn the German language. It is possible to get a job in Germany in some very specific fields if you don't speak the language perfectly. However, let me tell you the whole truth before you book your air ticket.

Let's start by getting a job in Germany.

  1. Get the job
  • In Germany, the German language is considered an important skill. So much so that many of the job descriptions clearly list language as an eligibility criteria in the job description. If you look at popular job sites (stepstone, monster, etc.), only 1 in 10 jobs would accept that the candidate speaks only English and has no knowledge of German. This reduces the number of jobs for which you are eligible. So statistically speaking, the chances of landing a job successfully are significantly reduced.
  • With that being said, you can land a job if you are highly qualified and apply very rigorously for a period of time after a series of rejections.
  • There are global corporations in the big cities that could make you an offer.

2. Thrive in work and social life

  • Remember that the first language of communication in most workplaces is still German. You should perform efficiently at work with your colleagues who (in most cases) would be native German speakers. Not knowing the language can compromise your efficiency to perform at work and also slow down your career growth.
  • For a closer integration into German society, you will get a better and faster answer if you know German. Unless people know the language, life can be comparatively difficult. Since I knew the language, it was much easier for me to organize everything and get cooperation compared to other people with the same nationality and economic position.
  • As Germany is slowly opening up to attract highly qualified foreign professionals, as it is necessary for economic reasons, the language situation is slowly changing but takes time. Government offices in the city of Düsseldorf have adopted English as an official language and the new generation is embracing English as a second language in schools, but the overall transformation will take more time.
  • So if you aspire to work in Germany and assimilate into German society, you'd better learn the German language sooner rather than later.

I hope my answer helped you. Health!

You can stay up-to-date on this topic by following the space here: IT careers in Germany

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Additional answer: Varun Mehta's answer to What are some tips and tricks for a successful job application in Germany?

Image source: Google.

This is me graduating very happy not realizing that I should have asked myself this question before moving to Germany in 2016 from Pakistan.

I graduated in Biochemistry and Cell Biology in a small town in northern Germany called Bremen. Of course, at the time, I was ignorant of the fact that there is a strong possibility that you need German to work in Germany, and even more so in this very specific field.

Note: At this point in the story, I am a very dumb person.

Around graduation, when I started applying for a job, I realized I had screwed up. Most of the job openings that c

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This is me graduating very happy not realizing that I should have asked myself this question before moving to Germany in 2016 from Pakistan.

I graduated in Biochemistry and Cell Biology in a small town in northern Germany called Bremen. Of course, at the time, I was ignorant of the fact that there is a strong possibility that you need German to work in Germany, and even more so in this very specific field.

Note: At this point in the story, I am a very dumb person.

Around graduation, when I started applying for a job, I realized I had screwed up. Most of the job postings I clicked on asked for a specific thing at the bottom:

"Fließend in Deutsch und English", ie "Fluent in German and English"

Clearly I was missing the German part of it.

Just to make things even more difficult, he was specifically applying for jobs that he didn't have the skills for. Intelligent.

Why do you ask? I hated my major in college and wasn't about to settle for it.

So let's see, I am not fluent in the language nor am I willing to use the skills that I spent 3 years developing. There is absolutely no way for me to get a job, right?

Fast forward 1 year, I work at Entrepreneur First, the world's largest talent investor, where I help super smart people build companies in Berlin.

Being in Germany without speaking the language, you have two options:

  1. Or be a loser and nobody in a German company
  2. Be a high-level player in the emerging startup scene in Germany

70% of the labor market understands the former and that is also why you probably asked this question.

But the last 30% is all yours to take advantage of and in my opinion that's also where innovation and exciting things are brewing and all you need to get a job is a valuable skill set (chances are, you have more tan than you had when you were applying).

If I, as an individual who received the worst possible card, that is, a foreigner who is not fluent in German and has studied a highly research-oriented degree, can make it on the German job market, then anyone can.

Fun fact: I am now B2 in German and all the other foreigners in my company come to me with questions when they don't understand or need help in German, how strange.

Remember, this only happens if you play your cards right;)

It certainly does! But sadly, only for the "right" people. Who are the "right" people, you ask? Anyone who works in engineering, computer science, natural sciences, business and economics, medicine and nursing, and who has attended college or a 3-year job training program and speaks decent German. For people with little or no ability in German, with little or no higher education, or with an education in subjects such as history, languages, literature, philosophy, etc., the chances of landing a well-paying job are not very good. Yes, German companies have quite a few vacancies, but most of them wo

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It certainly does! But sadly, only for the "right" people. Who are the "right" people, you ask? Anyone who works in engineering, computer science, natural sciences, business and economics, medicine and nursing, and who has attended university or a 3-year job training program and speaks German adequately. For people with little or no ability in German, with little or no higher education, or with an education in subjects such as history, languages, literature, philosophy, etc., the chances of landing a well-paying job are not very good. Yes, German companies have quite a few vacancies, but most would rather have these vacant positions than fill them with an unsuitable candidate and often

The situation is worse in the unskilled labor sector. Jobs that you don't need any degree or formal education for have not seen any increase in real wages for a long time and often only get temporary or part-time contracts. The number of jobs in the unskilled sector is also trending down due to automation: retail jobs are declining, as more things are bought online and more and more cashiers are being replaced by self-service machines, and Fewer and fewer people are needed in Amazon Warehouses as the development of fully automated warehouses continues. In case the whole idea of ​​drone delivery works, the package delivery stuff will no longer be necessary. For the moment, the situation of the low-skilled is not so bad yet in the sense that most of them find work. but since they are easily replaceable, they have no bargaining power, and the consequences are very low wages and the absence of permanent contracts. The same goes for cleaners, they barely get minimum wage and the work is pretty tough, they basically have to clean at full speed to get off work on time.

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