What IT jobs will disappear in the near future?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Leon Richards



What IT jobs will disappear in the near future?

Q. "What IT jobs will disappear in the near future?"

A. I'm not so sure that the Data Entry Operator / Clerk / Technician is such a dying breed; it all depends on a precise definition. I hope that in companies with more than three levels of management, there will continue to be a number of people who are primarily entering information that is for the benefit of another person.

I agree that doing it on paper tape, punched cards, and magnetic tape (another input mechanism) is no more, although there may be some roadblocks in the dusty corners of the world.

One specific job that I hope is now defunct are card operators v

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Q. "What IT jobs will disappear in the near future?"

A. I'm not so sure that the Data Entry Operator / Clerk / Technician is such a dying breed; it all depends on a precise definition. I hope that in companies with more than three levels of management, there will continue to be a number of people who are primarily entering information that is for the benefit of another person.

I agree that doing it on paper tape, punched cards, and magnetic tape (another input mechanism) is no more, although there may be some roadblocks in the dusty corners of the world.

One specific job that I hope is now defunct is card verification machine operators. In the past, a person wrote data on a card punch machine. The cards would then be given to someone else who would write the same information into a system that would verify what was on the cards. I personally saw a couple of such machines in the IT operations building around 1980 at the University of Melbourne (it was the internal IT group, separate from the IT teaching department). - See https://wiki.c2.com/?HollerithPunchCard and Punch Card Computing - technikum29 for more details.

Another example is the work of threading cables for the central memory, or even the wiring software in the central memory.

However, I am not aware of any currently viable job that will disappear in the near future.

Thanks Veron for the A2A

Currently on the list of endangered species is the Data Entry Operator / Employee / Technician. We no longer need someone sitting in front of a machine the size of a small Hammond organ with a QWERTY keyboard punching cards and then feeding one at a time into a giant computer. Similarly, we don't need someone to receive 11 ″ x 17 ″ sheets of paper connected end-to-end to bind into a book and then pore over an arcane script to translate into English.

Next on the list would be Computer Operator. Except for those that power removable media on midframe and mainframe computers, the personal computer requires less filing.

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Currently on the list of endangered species is the Data Entry Operator / Employee / Technician. We no longer need someone sitting in front of a machine the size of a small Hammond organ with a QWERTY keyboard punching cards and then feeding one at a time into a giant computer. Similarly, we don't need someone to receive 11 ″ x 17 ″ sheets of paper connected end-to-end to bind into a book and then pore over an arcane script to translate into English.

Next on the list would be Computer Operator. Except for those who push removable media into mainframe and midframe computers, the personal computer requires less data archiving and retrieval skills than that.

At the opposite extreme, until the day the system boards are self-repairing and components are regenerated, we will have repair technicians.

It is about the (manual) disappearance of work. The fate of IT is exactly that, including itself. Basically, everything manual in information processing is an IT fault.

So, as already mentioned, there are three options in IT: 1. Fulfill the IT mission 2. Operate in IT and test the race against the machine 3. Focus on tasks that are not worth the machine, just no business case . All three job categories will remain. Most jobs will change or be lost in Category 2.

A festival of buzzwords. "Strategic technology managers"? Seriously? Any technology manager must have technical skills. It is the only place where a manager can know absolutely nothing about the work that his subordinates do. Elsewhere, they are promoted from below and can, at any time, replace any of their subordinates right down to the conveyor assembly worker. A former technical "tech" engineer manager will always be lacking in IT, although corporate IT departments don't seem to be too concerned about that. Duh ... they would have to fire their entire management ultimately responsible for the

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A festival of buzzwords. "Strategic technology managers"? Seriously? Any technology manager must have technical skills. It is the only place where a manager can know absolutely nothing about the work that his subordinates do. Elsewhere, they are promoted from below and can, at any time, replace any of their subordinates right down to the conveyor assembly worker. A former technical "tech" engineer manager will always be lacking in IT, although corporate IT departments don't seem to be too concerned about that. Duh ... they would have to fire all of their management ultimately responsible for the over 70% failure rate. And please ... don't bundle Google and Oracle.

You don't want to work in a corporate IT department, also known as "IT." It's outsourced, and it's the only way to keep alive the hodgepodge of "legacy" systems with duct tape and zippers and equally outdated IBM and Oracle deals bought out of the blue, not to mention the billions of spaghetti codes written by monkeys from $ 5 / h code since then. The 2000s is, unfortunately, more "offshore" outsourcing, as no self-respecting Computer Science graduate would want to touch that mess with a 10-foot pole.

If you're talking about software development in general, progress only stopped in corporate IT departments (of non-technical companies) after the year 2000 was avoided. Tech companies like Google and Amazon kept inventing, so they need normal programmers to write normal code: elegant and efficient instead of something taped and zipped. As for the language, there will be no drastic changes, as everything "new" is still based on C ++ and Java. NoSQL, for example, Cassandra and Mongo, will go mainstream in 2025, hoping to end Oracle's reign. Sure, Mr. Ellison can buy anything.

Data, artificial intelligence, and other scientists are too specialized to be in high demand. A typical software company typically needs only one scientist (if any) of a specific type. You didn't ask about research labs, it doesn't matter at some university or on Google's payroll. It is not technology.

What will change by 2025 is the disappearance of many IT occupations, at least in smart companies (versus dysfunctional employee numbers and happy IT for working hours).

  • Specialized desktop support for Windows and MS Office installations, pesky antivirus and other nonsense. Not necessary after "bring your own device" is adopted, especially the non-Windows kind.
  • System / Network Administrators - Replaced by Cloud, for example AWS Hosting
  • Data Architects and Database Administrators - Replaced by the aforementioned cloud hosting with easy online administration and intuitive NoSQL databases that allow, for example, a Java bean to be loaded and saved along with all its nested content. Long overdue, as typical "mid-tier" programmers have been able to design relational structures and write / optimize SQL queries for several decades.
  • In general, the separation of "tiers" in a typical "multi-tier" application will give way to development teams with generalist "microservice" style staff responsible for the entire vertical subsystem / module. Today's developers can cover all layers of software, even without Node.js and Nashorn, showing unification of programming languages ​​and skills. The only separate specialization that will remain is Photoshop-experienced web / mobile art designer. Everyone else will be able to do the rest of the work.
  • Hour Counting Project Managers: Scrum and XP Butchers. Scrum means a self-managed team, you know. I can't wait for that redundant pseudo chain of command to go away.
  • Four types of "architects": application, data, solution and system (infrastructure). Just call them technical salespeople from your IBM or Oracle distribution company (sorry, "solution provider").
  • DevOps - Replaced by automated tools.
  • Third Party Recruiters. I know, illusions. No one will miss them.
  • Full-time business analysts. Remember Office Space with its "people person"?

The point I'm trying to make is that even if some of those dying specializations survive in "IT organizations" backwards, you don't want to work there. You want to target tech companies that only have three main occupations: engineer, designer, and manager. Minor specializations like SEO are more aligned with marketing, which is not part of the IT workforce at all.

Edit: A commenter asked about web development so I'm going to put it here.

The exclusive web development of JavaScript has already been merged with the so-called "intermediate level". The only distinction is between design (Photoshop), which requires truly artistic skills, for example manually drawing a pictogram and implementing the designer's vision, on all "layers". There are no tiers in the microservices architecture adopted by major technology employers.

I hope that JavaScript will become a strongly typed (optionally) language like Groovy, usable in all web application layers, as well as in the platform's "native" mobile development, which I hope will die as .exe files as soon as possible. Apple has never been a solid software company. Steve's genius temporarily brought him back from the long period of mediocrity, and hardware alone. As soon as you get back to where you were in the mid-90s, programmers will have one less thing to worry about: Swift. Whereas Google can go ahead and base Android on Chrome. Browsers enabled the Internet revolution and are still the future of the user interface.

As browsers become more robust, their programming, including HTML and CSS, will become more complex and will inevitably need patterns like Inversion of Control and Dependency Injection, Google has already experimented with the client side, without gaining much popularity. React (or its successor) can evolve into a Spring-rivaling container framework that wraps all browser services and UI programming patterns in clean OO APIs.

In any case, none of that is likely to happen in the next 10 years, while Forbes cluelessly praises "mobile technology" as it praised Blackberries in the mid-2000s.

The IT landscape is changing year by year, so the trend in 2019 (as 2020 has just started) may not be relevant in 2025, but here are some skills that will have a bright future1. Cloud: This is a hot skill right now. More and more companies are moving to the cloud to optimize costs. Big Shots like Amazon, Microsoft, Google are investing a lot of money in the cloud. Cloud architects and developers have long and promising careers.
2. Data Science - This is another of the most popular skills today. The applications are huge, from the fraud ...

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It's really good to see that you are motivated to land the highest paying job in the IT industry. The IT industry in general is made up of various types of roles that can offer you better career growth. To get the desired salary package and fringe benefits, employees need to train in the right fields and choose job opportunities that are worthy of their interest.

The salary range is primarily based on the company. There are mainly two types of companies that pay a lot,

  1. Very established companies that spend a pump to get the best talent on the market.
  2. Those startups with huge VC inv
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It's really good to see that you are motivated to land the highest paying job in the IT industry. The IT industry in general is made up of various types of roles that can offer you better career growth. To get the desired salary package and fringe benefits, employees need to train in the right fields and choose job opportunities that are worthy of their interest.

The salary range is primarily based on the company. There are mainly two types of companies that pay a lot,

  1. Very established companies that spend a pump to get the best talent on the market.
  2. Those startups with a large venture capital investment will spend better than the bigwigs to attract those engineers into established companies.

With that said, I know of some software engineers who earn 48 lakhs + annually (fixed component)

The expected salary for newbies is Rs. 2.4 Lakh PA for Rs. 8.5 Lakh PA for jobs in India by major multinational companies. However, top-tier financial sector giants like Moody's, Meryl & Lynch, HSBC, Goldman Sachs, etc. along with big tech companies like Amazon, Microsoft, Directi, etc. offer Rs. 10-30 Lakh PA for IIT, NIT, VIT, BITS and Manipal graduates. Mid-range multinational companies like Mu-Sigma and Samsung easily offer Rs. 6.5 Lakh to Rs. 8.5 Lakh PA for graduates of government and top private engineering universities.

But based on the things you mentioned about yourself:

  • Engineering graduate from a level 1 university
  • Proficient in competitive programming
  • Interest in web development and machine learning

This seems to be a perfect recipe for packets of fairy tales that we generally read about in the newspapers and see interviews on the television news.

Google offers ₹ 2 crore, Facebook offers ₹ 1.5 crore, Uber offers ₹ 1 crore, etc. Sky is the limit for you.

This can be a reality for you if you are really good at it. As today, the general hiring process and the compensation offered depends on the skills you possess. Therefore, my advice to you is to acquire the best skills necessary for the particular job position based on your interests and abilities. And you need to demonstrate your talent and skill to land your dream job.

Speaking of the web development industry as your area of ​​interest, there are three popular career options:

  • Back-end developer: a back-end web developer, is a software engineer who deals with programming and writes all the code necessary for the central logic of the website. The programmer takes data from the database and shapes it appropriately, which is used and displayed to the user through the interface.
  • Front-end developer: A front-end web developer, is a software engineer who deals with both coding and design through programming in different computer languages. The programmer ensures the representation of the data in a structured way that is displayed directly to the user.
  • MEAN Stack Developer: It is a combination of skills required by both the Frontend Developer and the Backend Developer. The individual must have a wide variety of interests in multiple computer programming languages. This position deals with coding and design. Full or MEAN Stack developers earn the highest salary in the web development industry.

Full stack developers (MEANs) are in high demand right now due to the benefits that the technology stack offers. The average salary of a MEAN stack developer in INDIA is over 6 LPA and the average salary of a MEAN stack developer in the US is $ 142,000. Full stack JS developers are being persecuted by companies like Amazon, Salesforce, Intel, Uber, Goldman Sachs, and even B2C startups like Paytm and Flipkart. So this is the best tech stack for years to come.

You can take MOOC certifications as there are so many options available online to start your learning. But if you are looking to start your career in this particular domain, I would say that you can go for the platforms mentioned below:

  1. Udacity - Provides online learning, but charges a large fee for it.
  2. edWisor.com, this platform is one of those places where you not only acquire web development skills, but you are also hired by companies for paid internships or a full-time position.
  3. Edureka (company): an online platform where you learn from video conferencing.

So here is the question. There are two problems with that question. This is what I mean:

  1. You are asking someone to predict the future. Now even if someone gets it right, we end up with the next problem.
  2. Even if someone gets it right, choosing a field just because it will be lucrative for a while is a recipe for misery.

People tend to choose niches or freelance careers because they believe they will make a lot of money. Now that may be true, but the problem is that people tend to feel miserable when they do a job just for the money. Also, with most people, your expenses increase with your inc.

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So here is the question. There are two problems with that question. This is what I mean:

  1. You are asking someone to predict the future. Now even if someone gets it right, we end up with the next problem.
  2. Even if someone gets it right, choosing a field just because it will be lucrative for a while is a recipe for misery.

People tend to choose niches or freelance careers because they believe they will make a lot of money. Now that may be true, but the problem is that people tend to feel miserable when they do a job just for the money. Also, with most people, their expenses increase with their income, which means that they are not necessarily richer, they are just running every day to ultimately have no savings or financial security.

Instead, what you need to ask yourself is, what do you enjoy? What is your passion? It could be a niche within you or it could be something else entirely.

Once you know what that is, you are much more likely to be successful as a freelancer as you will actually be motivated to do it every day.

Freelance work is a very broad topic, and if you're willing to dive into it, I post videos on it on my YouTube channel, The Freelance Question.

Selling will always be a valuable skill and there is no really clear answer to this question. Ultimately, I would say that no sales work is going away anytime soon, but this is my most complex answer: While automation can replace a large number of traditional sales people, there is still a desire for human interaction when making purchases. This is especially true if it is a commercial setting and not just an online product that is shipped to your home. Marketing and sales are the lifeblood ...

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Various industry studies have found that 90% or more of certified Indian "engineers" and "programmers" are not qualified to the level that companies expect. Glorified people who repair appliances are called engineers.

94% of Engineering Graduates Are Unsuitable for Hiring, Says This IT Hardcore

I'm not worried about those people creating excess competition in IT.

Nor will the wave of simplification lead to a decline in demand for advanced IT skills. Just because you can code a game without code doesn't mean you can move mainframe software to the cloud, handle advanced IT security.

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Various industry studies have found that 90% or more of certified Indian "engineers" and "programmers" are not qualified to the level that companies expect. Glorified people who repair appliances are called engineers.

94% of Engineering Graduates Are Unsuitable for Hiring, Says This IT Hardcore

I'm not worried about those people creating excess competition in IT.

Nor will the wave of simplification lead to a decline in demand for advanced IT skills. Just because you can code a game without code doesn't mean you can move software from the mainframe to the cloud, handle advanced IT security protections, or find the flaw in the interconnected network of software you have to work together to order. items through the supply chain. The sheer number of people piling up is on the low end, not the high end.

There is a complicated mix of conscientiousness, systems thinking, and advanced knowledge to get the tough job done at a high level. Being able to create interactive modules on a website, update a Wordpress theme, or test login sites is not good enough.

I spent a decade supporting the Sharepoint and PDM system. I handled a lot of problems, but that doesn't mean I was qualified to write new code or fix system interfaces.

Counting the people who handle first-rate support calls and write chatbot scripts increases the number of jobs in IT, but it doesn't mean we have millions more coders. I know what IT migration specialists are being charged, and the rate is so high that there is much more demand than supply.

Personally, I counted as a member of the IT department when I was providing user support, but I was not coding. However, I tested it regularly as a mid-level app manager. The demand is greatest for troubleshooters who know the entire stack and all sides of the interface… those are few and far between, but they are the ones we need the most.

TLDR: A lot of people are being classified as IT, but they don't have the advanced skills and experience for which there is the greatest demand.

Discussing careers that are popular and booming in the IT industry are

I don't have a good idea about the career options that are disappearing today, but I will list some good options to choose from as a career:

  • Software developer.
  • Data scientist.
  • Engineer in Artificial Intelligence (AI) / Machine Learning.
  • IT manager.
  • Information security analyst
  • Database administrator.
  • Computer systems analyst.
  • Computer science researcher.
  • Mobile app developer
  • User experience (UX) designer.

For more guidance and other career and career opportunities, simply visit the link provided below:

Career

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Discussing careers that are popular and booming in the IT industry are

I don't have a good idea about the career options that are disappearing today, but I will list some good options to choose from as a career:

  • Software developer.
  • Data scientist.
  • Engineer in Artificial Intelligence (AI) / Machine Learning.
  • IT manager.
  • Information security analyst
  • Database administrator.
  • Computer systems analyst.
  • Computer science researcher.
  • Mobile app developer
  • User experience (UX) designer.

For more guidance and other career and career opportunities, simply visit the link provided below:

Career Domain: Career Domain: Career Domain is an AI-powered career counseling organization that has guided many students towards their best career options.

Just visit the link once,

AI-powered career guidance | Career Domain "Unleash your potential" Find your perfect career Go to CareerDomainhttps: //www.careerdomain.org/

It is an increasingly vulnerable field, the bubble would soon burst. It's not just about automation that would eliminate work, but other layers keep being added.

Let me explain another way, automation keeps growing so people doing service desk service or L1 work will surely catch up, so you would say you have to switch to development or coding domain to save your butt.

But again there is another weapon on the way, you will find everything that comes as a service today. Few examples of cloud as a service, platform as a service, application as a service, integration as a service and many more. In 10 years for the

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It is an increasingly vulnerable field, the bubble would soon burst. It's not just about automation that would eliminate work, but other layers keep being added.

Let me explain another way, automation keeps growing so people doing service desk service or L1 work will surely catch up, so you would say you have to switch to development or coding domain to save your butt.

But again there is another weapon on the way, you will find everything that comes as a service today. Few examples of cloud as a service, platform as a service, application as a service, integration as a service and many more. In 10 years, the company managed its own local server, databases and the cloud were taking shape. People said that the customer in the bank, more concerned with data, would never go to the cloud. But today the reality is that even Swiss banks use the cloud!

so the next generation as a service comes with pre-build packages, so you should code minimal or low code. Along with the automation concept, everything as a service would end up with more jobs.

Always have plan B ready before entering a black hole!

The (possibly) bright side of job-killing automation

Please read, read this article, it will open your eyes that all jobs are at risk including construction by 3D printers and surgeons jobs are also being lost due to automation, it is not just their jobs.

By the time ERP and AI entered the scene, everything in the IT industry is at risk. In 20 years you will not have the job you currently work in, the only way to keep up is to keep learning new languages ​​and new technologies that are presented to you, this is how doctors keep up with new drugs and people of IT with the new technology we

Keep reading

The (possibly) bright side of job-killing automation

Please read, read this article, it will open your eyes that all jobs are at risk including construction by 3D printers and surgeons jobs are also being lost due to automation, it is not just their jobs.

By the time ERP and AI entered the scene, everything in the IT industry is at risk. In 20 years you will not have the job you currently work in, the only way to keep up is to keep learning new languages ​​and new technologies that are presented to you, this is how doctors keep up with new drugs and people IT with the new technology used. Stay up or fall sideways, these are the only two options.

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