What is your job How did you get it?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Abigail Berry



What is your job How did you get it?

My job is that of CEO or a small business that I started many years ago. I started my company when I was working as a full time employee for another company. I started my company as a side activity working in technology as an independent contractor for large companies. Since I couldn't risk giving up my full-time job because I had a stay-at-home wife, three children with my twins who had been born a couple of months earlier, I had a large mortgage and a large car payment. I kept my job full time for almost three years before my side hustle could keep me full time.

Welding.

First he dropped out of college. I worked for a few years. I couldn't live past 11 an hour. I went to college to weld.

My friend since he was 5 years old, his uncle worked in a plant that manufactures antennas for the government and airports. I got an interview. I have been there more than 3 years ..

Relaxed place .. Pays good enough .. Boring as hell to stare at a light all day.

I received my first dose of the Covid - COVAXIN vaccine yesterday (May 6, 2021) at DELHI. I checked the CoWin site a day ago and luckily got the space for the next day. Arrived at the vaccination center at the preferred time; There weren't many people as only registered people were on the list and kept the proper distance. We handed out a token number and then they called everyone in a batch of 10 people.

Registration Verification Done - Submitted for Vaccination.

The doctor asked if she had symptoms of fever or corona and then injected her with the vaccine. They asked to sit in a room for 30 minutes, in case someone felt uncomfortable or

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I received my first dose of the Covid - COVAXIN vaccine yesterday (May 6, 2021) at DELHI. I checked the CoWin site a day ago and luckily got the space for the next day. Arrived at the vaccination center at the preferred time; There weren't many people as only registered people were on the list and kept the proper distance. We handed out a token number and then they called everyone in a batch of 10 people.

Registration Verification Done - Submitted for Vaccination.

The doctor asked if she had symptoms of fever or corona and then injected her with the vaccine. They asked to sit in a room for 30 minutes, in case someone feels uncomfortable or has any problems, they can consult with the doctor.

Meanwhile, he received the message of Successful first dose of vaccination.

When the doctor was asked what to take in case of fever, he suggested taking a paracetamol tablet.

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Hunger increased after vaccination :)

4 hours after vaccination: I did not feel a fever, just a slight pain at the injection site.

10 hours after vaccination: no fever, sore at the injection site, so she used an ice pack for 6 to 7 minutes, took a paracetamol (crocin) tablet, and went to sleep.

24 hours after vaccination: pain at the injection site is not another problem.

Update 1

30 hours after the vaccination: pain in the injection area, but not severe and also did not face any other problems, for a safer side, he took the paracetamol around 27 hours.

Update 2

36 hours after the vaccination - the pain is still there, I felt some fever, the thermometer showed 99.2, so I had one more crocin with milk. A little gas, but it may be due to an irregular diet.

Update 3

54 hours after the vaccination, the pain is still there. No other problem.

Update 4

60 hours after the vaccination, the pain is still there.

I did not take any medicine or any kind of pack: ice / hot.

Update 5

84 hours after the vaccine, feeling a slight temperature, so he took crocin.

→ In total he took 4 crocin tablets until after vaccination.

Update 6

96 hours after the vaccination: the pain is almost nil, without feeling any other problem.

Update 7

120 hours after vaccination, all good, mild but insignificant pain.

Sometimes it feels a little up / down in the body, but it can be due to very less physical activities.

Update 8

June 8, 2021 - I received my second dose today.

I was looking for spaces in nearby states as Covaxin Dose 2 was not available in Delhi, but couldn't find any. In the morning I saw in the newspaper that Delhi had Covaxin so I checked and luckily got a space for myself at 9am. M. And, at 12 p.m. M., I got the second dose of the covid vaccine.

3 hours after the second dose of the vaccine: all mild, fine pain in the injection area.

Update 9

I didn't take any pain reliever or acetaminophen tablet at night, just applied an ice pack for 15-20 minutes to the injection site.

24 hours after the second dose of the vaccine: pain at the injection site is not another problem. So using an ice pack on the injected site.

Update 10

80 hours after the second dose of the vaccine: mild pain in the injected area with no other problem. Between 24 hours and 80 hours, for a short time she felt a little discomfort, but it disappeared automatically.

I didn't take any medication this time, I let the body adjust with the vaccine on its own.

Update 11

There was slight pain at the injection site for the first 4 to 5 days, but it went away. He did not take any medications related to pain or fever. I didn't feel any problem. Body back to routine level.

Today is the 11th day of the second dose, so good.

Bottom line: get yourself and your family vaccinated as soon as possible if you haven't already. People faced some health problems like fever / pain / nausea, but it is because the body is trying to adapt with the vaccine.

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Note: My father (aged 60 and over) and my brother also took Covaxin, but they did not face any problems, not even pain in the arm, so it depends from person to person.

I knew I wanted to be a fashion designer since I made my first dress (with the help of my after school workshop) when I was 9 years old. I was sketching ideas for my dress when I thought 'I could do this for a living'. '. It took me eleven years to come to the conclusion that real life and real jobs (as opposed to the adjacent fairy tale jobs we imagine as children) are very different from what I thought they would be as a child. I have worked to be a fashion designer almost every day since I decided to be at 9 years old. I took the design classes, the business classes, the textiles classes, the A

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I knew I wanted to be a fashion designer since I made my first dress (with the help of my after school workshop) when I was 9 years old. I was sketching ideas for my dress when I thought 'I could do this for a living'. '. It took me eleven years to come to the conclusion that real life and real jobs (as opposed to the adjacent fairy tale jobs we imagine as children) are very different from what I thought they would be as a child. I have worked to be a fashion designer almost every day since I decided to be at 9 years old. I took the design classes, the business classes, the textiles classes, the Adobe classes, the delogue classes, and the construction classes. And you know, the more I do it, the more I think 'this is the part I hate the most' no matter what part I'm doing. I '

So what? I decided what I wanted to be and then, seemingly too late, I decided I didn't want to do that. I remember I was doing a quiz as a kid, and one of the questions was 'Would you rather do something you hate and earn a big salary, or something you love and only earn half?' For me that was an easy question, of course I wanted the money. I asked my mom and she said she wanted to do what she loved. Now I am faced with a dilemma: should I work in construction, where I have been told there is a great future, and spend the money I earn on hobbies that I love or find a career that I really like? Personally, I have a lot of hobbies, but I rarely do them, because I'm busy with my education, my job, or any other excuse I have. So the answer is obvious. For me to be happy I need a career that makes me happy. I am still going to finish this education as I am halfway there, but when I finish, I will continue with other teachings. I will apply to an acting school, a writing school, and a BA in English, in that order.

Here is my reason behind them:

Acting: I've always liked acting. I love to dress up and lie, and I always thought acting would be a glamorous way of life. I never chased it, because I thought the odds were too slim. One day, I was telling my mom a joke, and she said "you should be an actress." I ask her why, and she says I have a sense of time. My mother is not the type to just hand out random compliments, nor did she ever say that I could become president, and she was always skeptical about me working in the fashion industry, so I value her word and go to Dale. one shot.

Writing: I have always liked books and have tried to write them since before I could write (I did my best, but I don't think it made sense). I have written with friends to pass the time and a year ago I started writing a book. I have a plan for that and the next two, and although I'm pretty slow in the process, I'm going for it. Very few are accepted into writing schools, so just my reason for trying is that if they accept me, it's something I should do.

English: I am a natural Englishman. It's my second language, and I'll tell you the same thing I told everyone, when they asked me why I'm so good at it: my family always watched a lot of television, mostly American, and I was too lazy to do so. read the subtitles. It sounds like shit, but it's actually true. Because it came so naturally to me, it has always been my favorite subject, and if there's one thing I can trust, it's that no matter how bad my day has been, English lessons will always make my day. So if I have to think of something that would make me happy for the rest of my life, it must be this, right? I'm still not entirely sure what to make of an English degree, but I guess I'll figure it out. For now, I think I will work as a translator, preferably in the field of politics (because I love keeping up with current politics). If nothing else, she could always be a teacher (the salary isn't that great though, but maybe that will change in the next 10 to 20 years? Here's the hope).

Late teens:

  • Lawn care (mainly mowing the lawn) I did this for two neighbors. One of them paid minimum wage and it was a pain to work for him. The other one paid 150% of the minimum wage and it was nice to be around. So this job was either poor or pretty good, depending on the employer.
  • Moving / stacking haybales and other agricultural work. The pay was generally minimum wage and the work was exhausting. Really useful for staying in shape, but I would hate to do it for a living.

Late teens and early twenties:

I had different construction inspection jobs during this time, with different pay levels and different employers. In general, if you were worried

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Late teens:

  • Lawn care (mainly mowing the lawn) I did this for two neighbors. One of them paid minimum wage and it was a pain to work for him. The other one paid 150% of the minimum wage and it was nice to be around. So this job was either poor or pretty good, depending on the employer.
  • Moving / stacking haybales and other agricultural work. The pay was generally minimum wage and the work was exhausting. Really useful for staying in shape, but I would hate to do it for a living.

Late teens and early twenties:

I had different construction inspection jobs during this time, with different pay levels and different employers. In general, if you worked with a great team, this job was not bad. But I had several experiences where the crew or working conditions were not good, and I decided to stay away from this type of work in the future.

After that, I briefly tried to freelance as an eSport coach. I liked the job, but found that most prospective students didn't have the financial resources to pay even half the minimum wage for my time. I couldn't keep doing that job, at the time.

I also tried starting a virtual reality arcade locally, but found that my area is too poor and not populated enough to accommodate that type of business.

Now I work as a civil engineer, I am in the structural design department for NYSDOT.

The pay and benefits are pretty good, and the workload isn't bad, but I find it pretty uninteresting. After saving enough money, I plan to become financially independent and live on dividend income from stocks, and get more involved in esports as well as my other hobbies.

I have been working for over a year and a half, I think I am eligible to answer this question.

There are some things that I look for in a job and they all need to be balanced and none are more or less.

  • How much am I learning compared to yesterday?

I don't take a job that requires doing the same thing over and over again. It is important that you learn something every day at the office. It would be great if the company provided enough resources to learn and develop not only as a professional but also as an individual.

According to me, there are two types of jobs, one requires an individual og

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I have been working for over a year and a half, I think I am eligible to answer this question.

There are some things that I look for in a job and they all need to be balanced and none are more or less.

  • How much am I learning compared to yesterday?

I don't take a job that requires doing the same thing over and over again. It is important that you learn something every day at the office. It would be great if the company provided enough resources to learn and develop not only as a professional but also as an individual.

According to me, there are two types of jobs, one requires an individual or group to create new things and the other (for the most part) is doing the same (created by someone else) efficiently. Obviously, the people who do the last part get paid less. Results are very important, people will not hire you for your knowledge, they will hire you for your results.

  • How well did I appreciate and guide towards the goal?

This is the most important part of the job. We are all part of a process, which requires individual and group efforts (Team) to achieve the common goal. It is vital that our supervisor appreciates our work and guides us toward the goal without bias. We must help our subordinates reach their potential by appreciating their work and guiding them accordingly. Some people I know left the company just to leave their managers. Your productivity in the office depends on your ability as well as appreciating the manager. Therefore, it would be very helpful to have a good relationship with teammates (this depends on the encouragement of your supervisor) and this, in turn, will improve the office environment.

  • How well am I paid according to industry standards?

There are some companies in India that pay according to the industry standards. There are obvious reasons why they don't. I am not interested in working for those companies that pay less and expect us to work more than 9 hours. Although it all depends on how much value you add to the project or business, it is important that you pay as much as you normally pay.

It depends on the job. For example, a teacher would look at how early he is promoted and in the IT industry would prefer the opportunity on the site.

Thanks

I had received my early childhood education and had been working in a nursery. He was very good at it and I put all my heart into it. After about a year, it was time for the increases. They explain that they only delivered raises of $ 0.10 this year. I really thought they were joking with me. Work didn't pay that much anymore even with my education. I knew they brought a lot of money for each child and I knew they were full of shit. I started applying for different jobs and one of them was for a staff member of a science museum. I ended up getting the job and I loved it. The director was a

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I had received my early childhood education and had been working in a nursery. He was very good at it and I put all my heart into it. After about a year, it was time for the increases. They explain that they only delivered raises of $ 0.10 this year. I really thought they were joking with me. Work didn't pay that much anymore even with my education. I knew they brought a lot of money for each child and I knew they were full of shit. I started applying for different jobs and one of them was for a staff member of a science museum. I ended up getting the job and I loved it. The director was an idiot and she was very prejudiced. We had many schools that came for field trips. He did not like inner-city children or children with special needs and expressed it regularly. It really bothered me. I had mentioned it to HR a couple of times about how annoying it was for me. Then one day I went to work and they told me she was fired. About a week later they approached me and asked if I was interested in being, not the director, but the coordinator of the museum. I was excited. I got a decent raise and was able to promote monthly children's programs and an outreach program. It was the most fun I've ever had and I got paid to do it! The sad thing is that after September 11, and after the recession, the museum ended up closing and becoming a mother school. We moved the offices to another location and they put me in administration for a year, but then they let almost everyone go, except the ones running the camp invention. It was difficult for me to find a job with museum experience because that was not where my education was. He didn't want to go back to kindergarten because he wasn't paying for a decent life. That was the only downside to the job because I seemed overqualified during my job search. I ended up finding another job, but it wasn't that profitable.

My path to the desired job is a little different than most.

I wanted to dabble in digital marketing and head towards branding, but I didn't have a degree or any relevant experience other than from a startup that I was a part of a long time ago.

To get the experience, I created a professional development project where I set up a Facebook ad campaign to market a webinar I was hosting, and I also had an offline initiative that didn't work that well, but was still fun. I documented all my steps and actions throughout the process, and once it was all over (it took about 1 month)

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My path to the desired job is a little different than most.

I wanted to dabble in digital marketing and head towards branding, but I didn't have a degree or any relevant experience other than from a startup that I was a part of a long time ago.

To get the experience, I created a professional development project where I set up a Facebook ad campaign to market a webinar I was hosting, and I also had an offline initiative that didn't work that well, but was still fun. I documented all my steps and actions throughout the entire process, and once it was all over (it took me about 1 month) I wrote a long blog post about the whole thing. It showed the landing page that I made for him, the posters that I designed and printed to promote it, and also the Facebook ads that I created. I also documented the relevant metrics.

I really wanted the blog post to tell a story, and I think I got it right. This was all while I was doing a program called Discover Praxis, which is a program that aims to be a kind of alternative to college that still leads to white-collar work.

My professional development project was month 2 of the program. The first month he had me create my own website and expand my social media presence. The fourth month he had me study relevant philosophy to build a career. The fifth month it was about practicing interviews. Month 6 was the beginning of what they call the Placement Module. In it, I created custom releases for specific companies I wanted to work for. Follow the link to access the platform I use to make my presentations, and here is a resource page to help you familiarize yourself with what they are, as you can use them to get any position, not just marketing roles.

After submitting 10 custom pitches, I landed an interview with a digital marketing agency called Upgrow. And after 3 more interviews over the course of 3 weeks, I got an apprenticeship (like an internship, but I basically do entry-level job duties). The apprenticeship lasted about 6 months, after which I decided that agency life was not for me. I combined the job search strategies I learned from Praxis and the experience I gained from Upgrow to start landing clients, and what I do now is serve their digital marketing needs. I am not doing my dream job yet, which would be completely in brand strategy, but I am steadily moving in the right direction.

Hope you answer your question and let me know if you have any follow-up.

I learn fast.

When I learned the audit process in a hotel, the manager gave most of the people 6 days of training. He had 2 and the 3 ran his turn alone. My friend's hotel gave her 4 days of training and she still hasn't received it.

In my current position, work fell into my lap. Some aspects were overdue. Data entry, filing, and the like had been neglected for a year. I spent the first week catching up on the presentation, the input, and the like. Then I took the next 4 months learning more and more and having more and more added responsibilities.

Finally, I took care of all aspects of the postulate

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I learn fast.

When I learned the audit process in a hotel, the manager gave most of the people 6 days of training. He had 2 and the 3 ran his turn alone. My friend's hotel gave her 4 days of training and she still hasn't received it.

In my current position, work fell into my lap. Some aspects were overdue. Data entry, filing, and the like had been neglected for a year. I spent the first week catching up on the presentation, the input, and the like. Then I took the next 4 months learning more and more and having more and more added responsibilities.

Finally, I took on all aspects of the position that I have now and the woman I "replaced" did not return. I still pick up small parts from my boss to ease some of his burden, but now we are both doing the work we 4 did 4 years ago and we still have a lot of time left. (We changed the software to make it more efficient too)

But each of us is different. At a job, after 4 months I was fired for not understanding their system.

I landed my current job with adult continuing education, pushing myself into awkward situations and volunteering for opportunities as they arose (as long as I had some ability). I worked hard and built many relationships that led to my current job. I asked myself, "What is the cost of doing nothing?" For me, the response was so terrifying that I convinced myself to push myself to work as hard as possible at the risk of no reward, but it would be better than doing nothing. Fortunately, it has paid off so far and my career is far from over ...

How do they hire you?

Finally. They hire you by engaging in conversations with people trained in hiring decisions who are looking for people with your skills and backgrounds.

The conventional way of doing involves these steps:

  1. Job offer. The contracting entity publishes a job title.
  2. Resume. This means yours. To be successful, it must be keyword rich, customized for a given job description (see 1, above).
  3. Interviews This usually begins with an initial 15-30 minute phone conversation, then typically involves one or more rounds of video and / or on-site interviews. For technical positions (e.g. Dev
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How do they hire you?

Finally. They hire you by engaging in conversations with people trained in hiring decisions who are looking for people with your skills and backgrounds.

The conventional way of doing involves these steps:

  1. Job offer. The contracting entity publishes a job title.
  2. Resume. This means yours. To be successful, it must be keyword rich, customized for a given job description (see 1, above).
  3. Interviews This usually begins with an initial 15-30 minute phone conversation, then typically involves one or more rounds of video and / or on-site interviews. For technical positions (for example, developer, security, or infrastructure), you will also have one or more rounds of technical interviews. In an early stage, a conversation should be struck about the desired compensation to ensure that expectations are at the same stage.
  4. Background Check. Most organizations that send out offer letters condition them to successfully pass a background check. This may involve one or more than a criminal checkup, financial health checkup, or drug test.

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