What is the worst career in the field of information technology?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Andrew Day



What is the worst career in the field of information technology?

My father, whom I love even more than I can explain, is a saint of man. The horror stories I heard would be an automatic kick in the ass and ever since he's been in business since the late 80's when an IT professional was known as a computer consultant.

so my dad is an IT OG, yeah I'm being silly.

so I am going to share with you the now familiar legend of the "porn boy". Oh god I only saw this guy years after this situation, he literally looks like a pervert guy.

well, my dad regularly came to this guy's house. Each. Single. Bleepin. Weather. "I don't know why, but it's going slow and those pop-ups are back" this mor

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My father, whom I love even more than I can explain, is a saint of man. The horror stories I heard would be an automatic kick in the ass and ever since he's been in business since the late 80's when an IT professional was known as a computer consultant.

so my dad is an IT OG, yeah I'm being silly.

so I am going to share with you the now familiar legend of the "porn boy". Oh god I only saw this guy years after this situation, he literally looks like a pervert guy.

well, my dad regularly came to this guy's house. Each. Single. Bleepin. Weather. "I don't know why, but it's slow and those pop-ups are back", this jerk was going to the same porn sites. Same videos. Every time. Well, my frustrated dad makes a comment that I should have to raise the rates to convince the boy to stop. At that point my dad lost that client and he never cared. I can only say that at the beginning of their interactions, the boy turned red in the face. He took my dad out of the room and said “look. Um. Let's talk as if we were two men ”my dad still laughs at that. Thus was born his legend as a porn boy.

I would also help my friends with their computer problems. Well, a former motorcycle buddy was now the last straw. I never touch anyone's computer after this. I was trying to recover a lost file. Well I do my thing and write the filename in

see if it's recovered. Sadly I couldn't save it, but they gave me a free ride down a fucking alley. Lots of younger, weird but legal gay porn. I remember one involved a priest. Euuurrgghh. Well that's what I saw. I was so scared. This guy looked like the gentlest, most straight older biker I've ever met. Well, I guess I made noise when I saw the files. I'm coming down the stairs and he looks angry. I just walked past him

and out the door

Any work that involves infrastructure or application support. The only time someone talks to you is when something doesn't work. The time it takes to fix the problem is always too long. And of course, when something doesn't work, it's your fault because you're the person to call, right? You can never do a good job. You'll never hear "wow, that system worked flawlessly for two years" or "solved that problem in record time."

Service desk, also known as level 1 support technician. High stress, high pressure to hang up the phone, catches you wrong for not getting all the correct information, or for not being able to spend the time to fix it on the phone, or for being able to find out the details with the client because of that. Stupid too long on the shit on the phone. You are under an unreasonable slave. Everyone assumes you are not that bright. And you never talk to a happy person ... sometimes they are indifferent ... but they only call you when something bothers them. There's a reason Tier 1 is one of the highest-turnover jobs in the industry.

I would say network administrator! It's nice when everything works, but… when it doesn't work, where do you look? AD, client, server, patch, switch, cable…. Sure, you will eventually find out what it is, but the time it takes, all the stress that you will get from the department, manager, CEO in the worst case, you will get the idea.

Top-notch general IT support. First of all, it is difficult to transition to other higher paying careers and you are usually micromanaged in calling rate. Second, the job title has not increased significantly in compensation over the past 20 years.

According to me, all IT jobs are worse.

How can you not believe who is good for you, until when and why did someone turn bad for you and when.

It is something like the Game of Thrones series where everyone will try to play their own strategies and techniques to grow and stay safe in the company.

Yes, it is true that no job is completely future proof. The big threat here is automation. And some jobs are clearly at a more immediate risk of being automated than others. For example, I would say that becoming a programmer is a safer long-term bet than becoming a GP.

It's also true that people entering the workforce today have never had more freedom of choice. These days, academic grades often take a backseat. The rise of industries that allow remote work has also destroyed centuries-old workplace constructions.

That leaves a lot of people entering the workforce.

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Yes, it is true that no job is completely future proof. The big threat here is automation. And some jobs are clearly at a more immediate risk of being automated than others. For example, I would say that becoming a programmer is a safer long-term bet than becoming a GP.

It's also true that people entering the workforce today have never had more freedom of choice. These days, academic grades often take a backseat. The rise of industries that allow remote work has also destroyed centuries-old workplace constructions.

That leaves many people entering the workforce in an unusual position: They have more options than ever, but the understanding that whatever career they choose can be automated in a few years. In fact, even the term career seems strange now: a holdover from a time when jobs were expected to last a lifetime.

My point is that software engineering is not going to be automated anytime soon. Neither will UX layout for that matter. Both are highly skilled creative jobs and, for now at least, they are safe from automation.

The demand for software engineers will continue to increase. We are on the cusp of several "revolutionary" social changes. And all of this will require software engineers! They will be needed to help us engage with user interfaces (augmented reality / virtual reality), build new infrastructure (blockchain), and much more (AI).

Once you've decided that you want to be a software engineer, you need to consider how best to "future-proof" the skills you learn. Studying the wrong languages ​​will negatively affect your income. Older skills like HTML and CSS are becoming staples. Competition here will continue to drive down prices.

So what skills should you learn?

At Scalable Path, we work with thousands of developers, and the most difficult roles to fulfill are always those of new and trending technologies. That's because there are few people with these skills and even fewer who can prove they have business experience with them. Part of my job (as CEO) is to identify growing macro trends and then determine "if" and "how" they will affect the skills needed in our developer network. Judging supply and demand correctly is key to our success.

JavaScript

The JavaScript market share will increase over the next half decade. There's so much momentum here that even if the tide turns, legacy systems mean JavaScript will still be dominant in five years.

Piton

Python is also on an upward trend. It is a popular language for machine learning, AI, and IoT. It took over from R as the primary language for scientific research a few years ago and has gone from strength to strength. Due to its flexibility and speed, I expect it to become one of the fastest growing languages ​​in the coming years.

I also look at future industries and the languages ​​and frameworks that will drive them:

Artificial intelligence:

AI is becoming a catch-all term (in the way 'algorithm' has been for the past few years), but overuse (and often inaccurate) of the term doesn't mean its impact isn't real. AI will continue to trickle-feed everything we do. One area that fascinates me is how it is likely to get good enough that it can "speak" a loosely defined design idea to a user interface tool, and will generate the mock design screens from those requests.

Learn:

- Python

- R

- Lisp

- Foreword

- Java

Augmented reality (AR)

In reality, this space has been static for a long time. Really from the touch screen revolution. But the near future should be fascinating for user interface designers, as AR is successfully navigating the transition from science fiction to reality. This happens in part because costs are going down. Which is generally a sign that we are close to wide adoption. We're likely to see more and more AR adopting mobile devices - the two blend so naturally. This is why I see augmented reality becoming more popular before virtual reality (see next section) - end users don't need new technology. That and both Apple and Google have launched their own AR developer.

Learn:

- ARCore framework with Java

- ARKit framework with Swift or Objective-C

Virtual reality (VR)

While we don't see many virtual reality projects yet, it is a fascinating area. If noticed by the general public, this technology could drive some wildly innovative changes in our daily lives. Of course, predicting such a change is fraught with difficulties. Like AR, we cannot imagine where it will take us, nor do we know if it will mature or how. What we do know is that it will start with headphones. Now lighter and cheaper (less than $ 200), the headphones are priced to go mainstream. With the assumption that they do not suffer the same fate as Google Glass, we may be only a few years away from similar social changes brought about by the iPhone / app store.

Learn:

- JavaScript

- Java

- C ++

- C #

IoT

IoT is just beginning to become a common language. Their goal is to create a network of connected devices, from key fobs to home appliances, that collect and analyze data to make them behave more intelligently. The launch has been slower than expected due to issues with the commercialization of IoT data. But as these hurdles are overcome, I expect to see technology used in many ways similar to the Jetsons. For example, Doors that recognize you and open or refrigerators that ask for your favorite food before it runs out:

Learn:

- Python

- JavaScript

Blockchain

Whether or not you buy the blockchain and crypto space in the long term, there is no denying that it is a huge and growing sector. You only need to look at the $ 100 million VCs that have just been injected into CoinBase to know that there are many more developer roles in this area. This is undoubtedly the fastest growing space for us.

Learn:

- Python

- C ++

- JavaScript

- solidity

Big data

Another skill shortage lies with the Hadoop developers. Again, this is due to the rapid increase in demand. Which in turn indicates that it will play an important role in the coming years. It is closely related to the rise of big data analytics trends. Businesses will want to analyze more and analyze faster. So these trends will continue to grow as almost everything I'm discussing in this answer is trying to collect and analyze data to better sell your goods and services.

I hope this has helped you realize that moving to software engineering is a safe bet.

Well I see some answers and I don't think they really answer your question.

First of all, the field of IT is vast but it can basically be divided into two:

  • operations (also called infrastructure)
  • development (programming)

So once you discover what you like, you can start your training. It's a great idea to know at least a little about what you don't choose. For example: if you decide to become a programmer, it would not hurt to know a little about TCP / IP and how computer networks work. What is a router, how does routing work, etc. A little knowledge of storage won't hurt you (NAS, SAN,

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Well I see some answers and I don't think they really answer your question.

First of all, the field of IT is vast but it can basically be divided into two:

  • operations (also called infrastructure)
  • development (programming)

So once you discover what you like, you can start your training. It's a great idea to know at least a little about what you don't choose. For example: if you decide to become a programmer, it would not hurt to know a little about TCP / IP and how computer networks work. What is a router, how does routing work, etc. A little knowledge of storage won't hurt you (NAS, SAN, NFS, iSCSI, SMB) and knowing a little about Windows Server and Unix / Linux (users and security)

After all, programming will take care of a lot of those things, especially when it comes to files, permissions, sockets, IOPS, etc.

and if you choose the infrastructure side, the. It won't hurt to know a bit about scripting (shell, power shell, python, perl, etc.) so as you can see if I were you, I'd pick a side and then work hard to learn a lot about it. , but don't rule out the other side either. A well-rounded engineer is a valuable asset.

With that said, if you're starting out with programming, do some research on Python, learn the basics of shell scripting, and maybe you can do a bit of C for a lower-level experience.

On the infrastructure side, learn the basics of TCP / IP, learn Linux (folder structure, users, configuration files, permissions) that would be the basics. And then you can venture into other areas.

Information technology is an exciting field, but it requires a lot of trial and error, a lot of research, and a lot of problem solving and curiosity. Above all, it requires your butt in a chair for long hours playing, learning, and testing.

prepare to spend countless hours searching forums for an answer, prepare to discover bugs in software, yours and others.

I would also recommend a mentor, either explicit or implicit, someone you can turn to if you have questions. Someone willing to share knowledge with you. I find the IT industry to be very private about knowledge at times, but it depends on geography, society and the environment. So you will find out.

If you are not passionate about it, you will be miserable. Trying to be an IT professional just because you think we get paid well is not the right reason.

I wish you the best in your new endeavor and I hope you enjoy the journey, it never ends!

Because only a small number of humans are ideally qualified to be a software engineer.

I believe that the quality and quantity of highly competent software engineers will probably remain constant now and in the future.

Software engineering is perhaps the easiest way to make a very good living, but it only suits a small majority of people as it requires specific intellectual and personality traits. For example, software engineering requires a combination of creativity and attention to detail that often contradict each other. For me, it suited me well, but many others find that it is less than opting

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Because only a small number of humans are ideally qualified to be a software engineer.

I believe that the quality and quantity of highly competent software engineers will probably remain constant now and in the future.

Software engineering is perhaps the easiest way to make a very good living, but it only suits a small majority of people as it requires specific intellectual and personality traits. For example, software engineering requires a combination of creativity and attention to detail that often contradict each other. For me, it suited me well, but many others find that it is not optimal for their career.

There is also limited demand for average software engineers, as their work is secondary and limited in scope, typically in the areas of existing codebase support and quality assurance. Average software engineers are replaceable and of limited use.

That is why the quality and quantity of software engineers is essentially limited in the long term.

The ability to create and innovate by designing new solutions to previously unsolved difficult problems is what matters in the end in terms of maximizing economic value and returns.

The typical functional option is to have a small group / team of 10x or 100x software engineers in a small venture capital - Silicon Valley funded by Wikipedia - Wikipedia Initial Public Offering - Wikipedia Startup Company - Wikipedia. I worked in 25 companies in 32 years, mainly in small startups in Silicon Valley: Wikipedia. The business economic model is stellar.

Creativity and excellence are what matters in the end, as a brute force with a large average group of software engineers does not produce anything of unique / high economic value.

High-tech developers are paid with good salaries and employee stock compensation, as Silicon Valley, Wikipedia is perhaps the most economically productive place on the planet.

Economically unproductive areas without high paying jobs have the unsolvable and intractable economic problem. There's only one Silicon Valley - Wikipedia and it's not moving anywhere as everyone in the tech industry has come and will continue to come here.

This is a big problem since Silicon Valley: Wikipedia will likely be the last place on Earth to have jobs for human workers. I wish the rest of the United States and the world would realize that this time it is different. Those jobs in Kansas will never come back.

Silicon Valley - Wikipedia drives automation that has been going on for decades and will continue as an irreversible process as ever cheaper, ever smarter automated machines permanently replace costlier human workers.

Jeff Ronne's answer to Is automation a friend or a foe?

Well, there are two variables there. It's difficult, but not impossible, to balance the two based on what you want.

One possible way is to be a core developer of some mission-critical piece of software and then move on to maintaining that software forever. In other words, load the job up front for the first 2 years and then milk for 5 or 10. But, you are sabotaging your career that way, because if something happens, you will never be able to move anywhere else with outdated skills. For this path to work, you have to find someone who will give you the opportunity early on to build everything from scratch and then stay away.

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Well, there are two variables there. It's difficult, but not impossible, to balance the two based on what you want.

One possible way is to be a core developer of some mission-critical piece of software and then move on to maintaining that software forever. In other words, load the job up front for the first 2 years and then milk for 5 or 10. But, you are sabotaging your career that way, because if something happens, you will never be able to move anywhere else with outdated skills. For this path to work, you have to find someone who will give you the opportunity from scratch to build everything from scratch, and then stay for a long time even when there is nothing to do. Good candidates are small software companies, financial / banking, family, people you know and who will give you a chance.

Another possible way that programmers don't want to admit it exists is to trash and move every six months to a year. It's "easy" because you never have to develop long term or build long term and you get out before the chickens roost. To make this trail work, you get a good / awesome education, ideally from a brand university (front load of work) and then move every few months drinking beer and churning out shit and then running away before having to deal with any maintenance.

Another possible way is to acquire extreme skill in some niche technology, say cloud or virtualization, and move on to IT support / some maintenance function. This depends on your ability to earn industry certifications throughout your life, which is the equivalent of memorizing multiple-choice answers. Then it charges as much, if not more, than the average software engineer because you have extreme responsibility, and I think most people would agree that coding is "more difficult" than maintaining servers and things ( debatable).

Another way (my favorite) is to make software and milk it for many, many years. Take it with you between jobs. Good candidates are code generators, any kind of database-related software, any kind of meta programming language, even open source repositories. The trick is not to use the software in your work (because then they would own it), but as a tool, a utility, or a library. And you can keep improving for many years. The best thing about this is that you can form the foundation of your own business.

Then you will see that there is a common thread ... it may be "easy" and "well paid", but you have to pay the price at some point, either early in your career or consistently throughout your career. Depending on your personal interests, it may or may not be "easy" (easy defined as doing something you want to do).

Same as me :-)

There are many options. Although you do not need to program, but if you really want to excel in your career, you must at least understand how programming works, it is a basic component of software engineering and information technology.

I am a mechanical engineer (I must say it was!), I joined a software company in 2000. This company (softener in Pune) used to have 6 months long training, they still provide the training. It used to be completely focused on training system administrators (SA) and database administrators (DBA). But the training started with C programming. Once we started

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Same as me :-)

There are many options. Although you do not need to program, but if you really want to excel in your career, you must at least understand how programming works, it is a basic component of software engineering and information technology.

I am a mechanical engineer (I must say it was!), I joined a software company in 2000. This company (softener in Pune) used to have 6 months long training, they still provide the training. It used to be completely focused on training system administrators (SA) and database administrators (DBA). But the training started with C programming. Once we started with pointers, b-tree, and q-sort, my head was manipulated: assignments used to be programs. Even after looking at the resolved assignments, I couldn't understand the logic of how the program flows. I really pushed myself, I even joined the C programming class outside. Although I learned, I didn't really enjoy it.

Those who could get it right were highly regarded and put on the fast track for system administration (particularly the Unix track). They were really good at solving problems.

Although I have collected it to a satisfactory level, I never enjoyed it. So, I sided with the DBA (Oracle) track. But I guess they need to program PL / SQL and Pro-C too! So I learned.

And at work, I used both, but often used to avoid programming-related tasks. And gradually I realized that almost no programming is required in DBA jobs. It always used to be a team effort and someone who is good at programming or wants to excel at it will take care of those tasks. And you can focus on other tasks. Your team leader will also learn and will not feel safe assigning you tasks that require strong programming skills.

Then he saved me.

Fast forward: when I got a promotion and was taking care of a small team.
I often used to think about saving time and automating jobs, and started doing little shell scripts and shell programming. Remember that you had learned a little programming before. That really helped me learn to program in Shell. I was one of the best on those teams that handled screen programs. And it used to automate a lot of small / mundane tasks. That got the attention of one of the project managers and they sent me to the site. They probably thought this is a better person!

I spent about 8 years abroad, I worked in various teams as a DBA, but programming was never part of my job. I continued to do shell programming, but since it's never a lot of work and no company ever has a shell programmer position, it was always my interest or hobby!

The bottom line is that NO programming is really necessary to survive or develop a career in IT / Software, but knowing a little about it will help. I interacted with a large number of people in version control, testing, networking, business analyst, documentation specialist, database-related activities, administration, networking, monitoring and security specialist; surprisingly, not everyone had to do programming. Or programming used to be a very small part of your job.

In fact, you will gradually find that "developer" is used as a "low-end" label. Even that started to be reflected in discussions like: "There are no developers on the site, they don't need to be on the client end" etc. (That's not really good, but that's how things happened.) They will only be on site for a short troubleshooting period or major deployments. As you move up the ladder, people want to know themselves as an architect, specialist, project managers, customer-facing roles, etc. Very few want to be known as "specialized programmers." This could probably be due to the type of companies and projects I worked with (mainly I work in the banking field, which is all too often part of the investment industry). At core technology companies, things can differ.

So learn to code, but you don't have to accept it as a "necessary evil" - it's avoidable in the long run. You will quickly learn about the relevant roles in the future.

All the best!

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