What is the scope of employment after a PhD in marketing from a reputable university?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Alfie Young



What is the scope of employment after a PhD in marketing from a reputable university?

Here are some of the career paths I've seen for marketing PhDs:

  • marketing professor
  • management consultant at a company with a background in hiring doctors (e.g., McKinsey, BCG, ZS Associates)
  • boutique management consulting firm
  • marketing scientist or manager of a corporate company (e.g. analysis, pricing, behavior)

Note that when one enters a PhD program at a reputable university, there is generally a very strong inclination towards future placement in academia (at least for US PhDs).

If in the 20th century it was essential to have a good accountant and lawyer, in the 21st century companies must have a marketing expert or a specialist in public relations. In today's world, it's more about how you sell a product. Companies need to be more serious to have a good marketing team or a marketer on their team. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics has already projected that the employment of advertising, promotions and marketing managers will grow 10% between 2016 and 2026, faster than the average for all occupations.

In 2017, the median annual salary for marketing managers was $ 132,230 and $ 62.20

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If in the 20th century it was essential to have a good accountant and lawyer, in the 21st century companies must have a marketing expert or a specialist in public relations. In today's world, it's more about how you sell a product. Companies need to be more serious to have a good marketing team or a marketer on their team. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics has already projected that the employment of advertising, promotions and marketing managers will grow 10% between 2016 and 2026, faster than the average for all occupations.

In 2017, the median annual salary for marketing managers was $ 132,230 and $ 62.20 per hour.

The vast majority of marketing PhD graduates become marketing professors. There really isn't much of a nonacademic job market in marketing.

I was working full time when I completed and completed my PhD. So yes, it is doable. From start to finish, pursuing a doctorate. It is a challenge, but let's get to the point. It's all about the dissertation that will kick your ass if you let it. From posing the research problem and questions, writing the proposal, conducting the research and methodology, to writing the thesis, all of those tasks (and I've probably skipped a few others) will be time-consuming. when you work more than 40 hours a week.

So below are some thoughts and tips that I remember during my PhD. I travel when I work

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I was working full time when I completed and completed my PhD. So yes, it is doable. From start to finish, pursuing a doctorate. It is a challenge, but let's get to the point. It's all about the dissertation that will kick your ass if you let it. From posing the research problem and questions, writing the proposal, conducting the research and methodology, to writing the thesis, all of those tasks (and I've probably skipped a few others) will be time-consuming. when you work more than 40 hours a week.

So below are some thoughts and tips that I remember during my PhD. I travel when I work at my job full time.

1) The mechanics of completing the course requirements are almost the same as obtaining a master's degree. You will have to study and pass the exams of the individual courses that are part of your doctorate. Program. What is different is that you will have to retain and apply that knowledge to pass the comprehensive exams (also known as qualifiers) after completing the courses.

TIP: Review your course notes / slides from previous courses between semesters (or quarters). Prioritize this phase in the same way that you did your master's while working full time. Why? The more knowledge you retain from your accumulated coursework, the better prepared you will be for full exams rather than taking time off to study exams "on the fly."

2) It is never too early to start discovering your research topic. For me, formulating the research problem and the corresponding research questions was painstaking. It took me about three semesters (for example, almost a year and a half) to finalize a research topic. It had been about a year AFTER I passed the qualifying exams before I actually came up with an acceptable research problem and question due to having multiple research interests. It took another ~ 8 to 9 months before I wrote the proposal and successfully defended it.

TIP: If you are armed with several sources of inspiration for research topics BEFORE applying for a PhD. program, that's useful. However, be flexible. Your research interests may change over time, especially as you complete your courses. In my case, I wasted two years (and paid the tuition) by not investing more time earlier in my research topic / interest.

3) Verbally negotiate the scope of your dissertation with your advisor and write that agreement as your personal contract.

TIP: If you are too ambitious, plan to work on your PhD. longest degree. My advisor and committee allowed me to contact them when I was "ready" to review drafts and seek feedback while writing the thesis. In hindsight, I should have set deadlines for myself. When writing the thesis, set weekly and / or monthly deadlines on the content aligned with the scope discussed with your advisor (eg, "your personal contract"). This will help you prioritize content writing when you're not working during the day (or the night shift for some people).

4) If you are concerned about how much detail (or how little) to write certain sections of your dissertation, take the guesswork out of having more frequent reviews with your committee and advisor.

TIP: There were times when I felt distress when certain sections of my dissertation looked lean or there were not enough sources / literature to support my ideas / concepts. In this case, don't be afraid to seek guidance from your advisor. Release your ego and be willing to ask for feedback. In some cases, my advisor suggested that the content I had already written could be carried over to other areas of my dissertation to reinforce concepts. This saved me a lot of time and reduced the need to review entire chapters or important sections of the draft.

5) If you are not careful, you will lose track of your digital references.

TIP: If I'm using Microsoft Word, I've found it helpful to insert a comment indicating the filename of my references for quotes or ideas being cited. This will save you a lot of time, especially when finishing or polishing the bibliography section of your dissertation. After accumulating several hundred references composed of PDF, Word, PowerPoint, Excel and image files, this practice easily saved me a lot of time "searching" for the computer file with the content to cite.

6) Most importantly: get enough sleep.

TIP: Sometimes writing your thesis will feel like a full-time job. Appreciate the sleep you can and never write your dissertation when you are half awake.

Of course you can, as long as there are many good institutions that offer you the best quality education on the subject.

However, before diving headlong into a Ph.D. In digital marketing, I would like you to take a step back and think and analyze your decision, since we are talking about a highly evolving field like digital marketing here.

Well, from my personal experience and having spent a lot of time in this field now, I strongly believe that there is really no need for a PhD. in this field. You can learn this topic easily and make sure you work hard and with dedication.

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Of course you can, as long as there are many good institutions that offer you the best quality education on the subject.

However, before diving headlong into a Ph.D. In digital marketing, I would like you to take a step back and think and analyze your decision, since we are talking about a highly evolving field like digital marketing here.

Well, from my personal experience and having spent a lot of time in this field now, I strongly believe that there is really no need for a PhD. in this field. You can easily learn this topic and make sure you work hard and dedicated to achieve the greatest amount of success in this field with the proper guidance.

Requirements for the field of digital marketing

Now all that the field of digital marketing demands of you is to learn the subject in a very simplified way and that you can also start by learning for yourself at the beginning and then approach an industry expert to seek their guidance on the subject and your career path too.

Reasons why I would not recommend a PhD. in digital marketing, they are:

Universities or colleges that offer a Ph.D. In digital marketing, it usually takes a long time with a minimum of 3 years minimum (obviously if you are considering a PhD), which is certainly not necessary for a field like digital marketing.

Now, digital marketing is an ever-evolving topic that needs you to constantly learn about it and get new insights and updates on it from various reputable resources, with or without a job.

Also, it requires you to have a more industry-oriented learning experience rather than a laboratory-oriented one. You have to be out there, do things yourself and thus get the practical experience that would really count a lot in this field.

In fact, this is what companies expect. More than academic training, they will be more interested in how much real-time exposure you had in this field. Your experience is what counts and not your PhD. degree.

Also, for a Ph.D. You will have to shell out a lot of money to learn and acquire the degree. While if you take a short-term course, about 3-6 months in length, which is enough to learn and master digital marketing, it is better, of course, at a much lower cost as well.

Additionally, Ph.D. Offering Universities would not have industry experts as professors or trainers. Rather, they would have professional academics focusing more on theory.

This is certainly not required in a field like digital marketing, which is very practice-oriented.

From my personal experience, I highly recommend that you attend the free online demo session conducted by IIM SKILLS on their website to learn more about such courses, which are also conducted online so that you can attend them from the comfort of your home. as well as.

I joined an R&D lab after a postdoc. My postdoc time was added as work experience, my doctorate time was not (which makes sense, considering all the researchers there had a doctorate anyway).

Some of my friends entered more application-oriented positions after their PhD. For them, in general, half or less of their doctorate time was counted as work experience. Therefore, most 5-6 year PhDs were counted as 2-3 years of work experience. Note that I am counting pure real time PhD, not the preparatory phase where you only take graduate classes. The additional 1-2 years of graduate-level classes are simply counted

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I joined an R&D lab after a postdoc. My postdoc time was added as work experience, my doctorate time was not (which makes sense, considering all the researchers there had a doctorate anyway).

Some of my friends entered more application-oriented positions after their PhD. For them, in general, half or less of their doctorate time was counted as work experience. Therefore, most 5-6 year PhDs were counted as 2-3 years of work experience. Note that I am counting pure real time PhD, not the preparatory phase where you only take graduate classes. The additional 1-2 years of graduate-level classes are simply counted as a master's degree.

Sometimes you will be hired at the entry level, especially if your PhD does not have a direct link to your area of ​​work.

My suggestion is that you only do a PhD if you love to do research and then get a research job. Otherwise, you will be 3-4 years behind your peers on the wage curve. Of course, the knowledge and experience you gained from being individually trained by your supervisor could help you get up to speed, but financially, it almost certainly won't be worth it. (Of course, if you were scammed into paying for an online PhD, you won't get the individual training that is the main benefit of a PhD, so not even that.)


Another thing: if you get a research job, you will work almost exclusively with other doctors, so no one is called “dr. so-and-so. "It will feel quite strange to hear someone call you" Dr. ". My former boss (also in research) only called me by that title if he thought I was wrong, as a way of saying" can I remind you that you have a Ph.D. and therefore are you not supposed to make that kind of rookie mistake? ? "

Corollary: if you know someone who introduces himself as “dr. so and so ”, you can be pretty sure you are a doctor or that you had to settle for a company where doctors generally don't want to work. All good doctors went to work in research labs where using that title is rare.


Final note: some German humor, with English subtitles:

Well, okay ... If I read a lot of the answers on Quora, I get the impression that the PhD journey is mostly routine. To a large extent, it is. Success is practically a test of endurance, stubbornness, and concentration. So maybe there is a legitimate impression that it is not fun.

For me, much of the trip was fun. The funniest part was the end, when I finally defended my dissertation before my committee. Most people worry about oral defense, but at some point, I realized that this was MY show, not theirs. So, I decided to inject some humor into it and just tell my story. I actually made them laugh

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Well, okay ... If I read a lot of the answers on Quora, I get the impression that the PhD journey is mostly routine. To a large extent, it is. Success is practically a test of endurance, stubbornness, and concentration. So maybe there is a legitimate impression that it is not fun.

For me, much of the trip was fun. The funniest part was the end, when I finally defended my dissertation before my committee. Most people worry about oral defense, but at some point, I realized that this was MY show, not theirs. So, I decided to inject some humor into it and just tell my story. In fact, I made them laugh at some points.

Working with my cohort (fellow students, colleagues) was fun too. Especially group projects. Some people didn't really take me seriously when I asked them up front what note they wanted to get out of this. Together, we figured out how to get A's consistently. Together, we practically made it through our classes.

And there was a class where they asked us to introduce ourselves. I got our group to introduce themselves as "Bob." That was fun, especially when the teacher (who took herself too seriously, anyway) got flustered and left for a few minutes. At some point in that class, he realized that we had all come prepared for class, having done all the previous readings together.

And some nights after work when I was leaving my home office to show my wife the newspaper I had just finished. He feigned interest in my work and smiled and pretended to read it with great interest. I was grateful for it.

Sometimes editing other people's work can be quite fun.

So yeah, there were a lot of fun moments amidst the tedium of studying, researching, and writing.

I am about to finish my industrial doctorate in a few months. My subject is machine design. Here in Sweden, the industrial doctorate is quite common. Generally, the student is required to dedicate at least 50% of the working time to the research project. I have been lucky and have spent almost all my time on it (90% research, 20% normal work, not a typo…), and I will finish in a total of four years, which is the expected time for the PhD here.

Some pros and cons:

Salary and industrial benefits (as well as discounts for students).

Get relevant industry experience. This is important to me as I have always intended to stay in the industry.

H

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I am about to finish my industrial doctorate in a few months. My subject is machine design. Here in Sweden, the industrial doctorate is quite common. Generally, the student is required to dedicate at least 50% of the working time to the research project. I have been lucky and have spent almost all my time on it (90% research, 20% normal work, not a typo…), and I will finish in a total of four years, which is the expected time for the PhD here.

Some pros and cons:

Salary and industrial benefits (as well as discounts for students).

Get relevant industry experience. This is important to me as I have always intended to stay in the industry.

Have a guaranteed job upon graduation.

I can use equipment both in my company and in the University. This is huge for me, as my company has a world-class laboratory for my specific project.

I got a lot of data for product usage and the specific details to work with. So far, I have been allowed to post what I need and want.

I am already applying my results in large development projects. My research is influencing how we design things, and it has for years, and I am not done with my PhD yet. When I'm done, the parts designed with my methods will have been on the market for over a year.

Cons: I would probably find it difficult to land a full-time academic position, except in the case of highly applied research directly related to my area.

I know of cases where industry and academic goals don't line up due to project changes. There is a risk if it is not finished.

Risk of a large workload with PhD and industry demands.

Excellent question.

My PhD friends in marketing and I discussed this.

So if you do experiments then a marketing PhD is better than a psychology PhD because you get paid more while doing similar research.

If you are a PhD in quantitative marketing, then you are happy that you get paid more than operations, but unhappy because you get less than finance.

In terms of external options, PhDs in quantitative marketing have more options. I've seen several work for tech companies. However, PhDs in behavioral marketing also get corporate jobs.

Now about the salary: if you are a good PhD in quantitative marketing and doing very well in a technology company,

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Excellent question.

My PhD friends in marketing and I discussed this.

So if you do experiments then a marketing PhD is better than a psychology PhD because you get paid more while doing similar research.

If you are a PhD in quantitative marketing, then you are happy that you get paid more than operations, but unhappy because you get less than finance.

In terms of external options, PhDs in quantitative marketing have more options. I've seen several work for tech companies. However, PhDs in behavioral marketing also get corporate jobs.

Now about the salary: if you are a good PhD in quantitative marketing and you are doing very well in a technology company, you can get paid a lot! The only problem is that sometimes you compete with PhDs in physics and C / S.

What about the doctorate itself? Depending on the program, the doctorate in marketing can be acceptable and hellish. I have seen programs where the entire doctorate in marketing applies only to the doctorate in statistics. They take many courses from the statistics and mathematics departments. They can be very difficult. Then there are those that are less quantitative.

Also, a problem with the marketing PhD is that the job market is very early, so you really have three and a half years to graduate in five years.

Good luck!

You have to be interested enough in the project to spend at least two years doing the research, one year doing the analysis work, and one year writing your thesis, so you should choose a topic that interests you.

If you are doing this in India, you could study the effect of marketing on, for example, the growth of the iPhone in India versus the growth of the overall cell phone market. Or the growth of the iPhone market and the growth of the infrastructure to support wireless phones. Since some parts of India are not fully electrified yet, you could study the power industry in the Indian market and the growth of the

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You have to be interested enough in the project to spend at least two years doing the research, one year doing the analysis work, and one year writing your thesis, so you should choose a topic that interests you.

If you are doing this in India, you could study the effect of marketing on, for example, the growth of the iPhone in India versus the growth of the overall cell phone market. Or the growth of the iPhone market and the growth of the infrastructure to support wireless phones. Since parts of India are not yet fully electrified, you could study the power industry in the Indian market and the growth in the number of homes now electrified.

Those are topics that interest me and you will need to find topics that are of interest to you. To limit your research commitment, you can select a geographic location to study the suggested topics.

In the end, you will have to choose the topic.

Probably a lot like any other PhD! Lots of backbreaking work, loneliness, and writing and rewriting ad nauseam! One place where you will earn a Ph.D. of science is that no one expects you to go on to do a postdoc! Academy job openings in the US are reasonably available to marketing PhDs and the salaries are very good.

The most popular doctoral programs in marketing are consumer behavior, quantitative marketing, and marketing strategy (recent branch). Most programs, at least the top-tier programs, prepare you to become a research professor - that is, to join a research university and teach as well. My personal belief is that you are overqualified for most jobs in the industry.

That said, I know PhDs in quantitative marketing who join companies to lead their market research and analysis team. But 90% end up in (or at least hope to end up) in academia.

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