What is the salary for new graduates starting at Google in 2016?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Lia Pratt



What is the salary for new graduates starting at Google in 2016?

I received my offer for a new graduate software engineer position in Mountain View a couple of weeks ago, starting in January 2016. I am about to complete my bachelor's degree and have a competitive offer from another large consumer software company (capitalization market value in the range of $ 15 - $ 30 billion):

  • 105k annual base salary
  • 15% target annual bonus (as my recruiter told me, 15% is the minimum and the actual bonus can go up to 25-30%)
  • 15k signing bonus
  • 250 units of stock for 4 years
  • 6k relocation paid within 1 month of start dates


Note that this is the base / average salary for a recent graduate with a bachelor's degree. For a teacher's degree

Keep reading

I received my offer for a new graduate software engineer position in Mountain View a couple of weeks ago, starting in January 2016. I am about to complete my bachelor's degree and have a competitive offer from another large consumer software company (capitalization market value in the range of $ 15 - $ 30 billion):

  • 105k annual base salary
  • 15% target annual bonus (as my recruiter told me, 15% is the minimum and the actual bonus can go up to 25-30%)
  • 15k signing bonus
  • 250 units of stock for 4 years
  • 6k relocation paid within 1 month of start dates


Note that this is the base / average salary for a recent graduate with a bachelor's degree. For a masters the starting salary is around ~ 110k, for a PhD I guess ~ 120k or more.

Google does not negotiate based on what candidates say, but only on competitive offers. From what I've read, they don't increase base salary, but they can increase the amount of signing bonuses and stock options.

Where I know of that Google, it has come to rescue practically each and every Indian college student at the time of their projects, presentations and whatever. This Silicon Valley-based company, backed by an Indian named Rajeev Motwani in its early days, is one of the highest paid information technology companies in India today. Giving a median salary of around 14 lpa for honeymooners in India plus the added brand value of working with this company is nothing less than finding a gold mine for a newcomer in India. The average salary for a senior software engineer in Google India is over 25 lpa.

"Google Bangalore pays a CTC of around Rs 17 Lakhs to B Tech and Rs 18 Lakhs to M Tech (most recent)".

Rs 18 lakhs is approximately $ 28,500 USD. Less than 1/5 of the cost.

Two years ago there were 3.6 million software developers in the United States? India had around 2.75 million and was expected to overtake the US in 2018 with 5.2 million developers, an increase of almost 90%, up from an expected number of 4.5 million in 2018 in the US, an increase of 25% during that period.

Google california pays a CTC for the first year of $ 167,000 (base 100k, variable 15k,
shares of 31.25k (125k in 4 years),
bonus of union + relocation of ~ 20K).

Google Bangalore pays a CTC of around Rs 17 Lakhs to B Tech and Rs 18 Lakhs to M Tech (most recent).

At IIT Bombay.

Edit:
10 Lakhs = 1 million

Go to Hackerearth.com. You will get all the details about reputed IT companies including locations and career opportunities, the advantages these companies offer. The minm. Salary that google offers to an engnr associate. is 14 LPA

As a staff software engineer, it is definitely possible to earn 500k a year inclusive. The real challenge is how aggressive your timeline is. That is not to say that it is not possible to do so. But it is less likely. So let's try working backwards through a possible timeline of how this can happen:

  1. 500k, even as a staff, is on the higher end of the pay scale. So you would have to push the staff and then be a consistent top performer to get even more raises. That means you probably need to get to staff before the fifth year.
  2. To get promoted to staff, you typically need 3-quarters of exceeds expectations.
Keep reading

As a staff software engineer, it is definitely possible to earn 500k a year inclusive. The real challenge is how aggressive your timeline is. That is not to say that it is not possible to do so. But it is less likely. So let's try working backwards through a possible timeline of how this can happen:

  1. 500k, even as a staff, is on the higher end of the pay scale. So you would have to push the staff and then be a consistent top performer to get even more raises. That means you probably need to get to staff before the fifth year.
  2. To be promoted to staff, you generally need 3-quarters of Strongly Exceed Expectations or more. That means it should be performing at the staff level by the second quarter of year 4.
  3. That means you have 3.5 years to go straight from college to staff-level performance. The thing about Google is that we use a lot of proprietary technology. So even if you are completely familiar with popular industry standards and frameworks, you will still feel incredibly lost on your first day here. So let's say it takes you 3 months to get all the in-house technology (which is an incredibly optimistic assumption. Most people take 6 months).
  4. Now you have 3.25 years left to do the work necessary to go from L3 to L6.

So how do you go from being a new hire to someone who is trusted with a great cross-team effort in just 3 years? While this is not a complete guide, there are some common traits that I have observed in all the successful leaders in my group:

  1. Be humble - you have a lot to learn from L3 to L6. Google's tech stack is huge and complex. And if you work on one of the more popular products like Ads or Maps, there is a lot of history behind those areas. So while some technical designs may look stupid or in elements from your perspective, there could be many historical reasons behind this. In fact, some of those reasons may still be valid. And even if they aren't, it makes sense to first understand the historical context behind them, before making improvements. And the best way to get that context is to be humble and ask the most important members of your team to explain the situation.
  2. Be productive: this goes without saying. To be entrusted with large and important cross-team projects, you need to show that you can get things done. So if you are assigned a task, do it quickly and do it thoroughly. Keep your commitments and promises.
  3. Be Passionate: To truly become a leader, and that's what it takes to earn that kind of income, you need to start treating your job as more than just a job. You should start to feel like an owner and to feel passionate about what you are working on. All the best leaders genuinely care about the product and achieving customer / user excellence. They spend more time and extra effort, rolling up their sleeves to do the dirty work that is often required.
  4. Be Product Driven - This ties into passion in the sense that you need to not only be good technically, but also have a vision for the product you are working on. What are the strengths and weaknesses of the product today and how do we address them so that we can create more “magic moments” (as Larry puts it) for the user?

In terms of the numbers 3 and 4, it helps to delve into an area that you are already familiar with. For example, if you're already a YouTube video producer, you may have an intrinsic understanding of how things work on YouTube, what creators are looking for, and what pain points they suffer from. And if so, you may be able to start contributing significantly early on. So it would definitely be helpful if you managed to get into an area that you are already well versed in. But even then, remember to make your suggestions humbly. Many of the higher-level people on your team may have been working in this area for the better part of a decade, and they probably know more than you do. So it never hurts to listen first and then speak.

In any case, good luck! I hope you achieve your ambitions.

I worked at Google for 6 months in New York and had a terrible experience. That had more to do with my manager (so terrible that a recruiter I worked with, a year later, had heard of him; he had a pattern of using fake performance issues to unravel people's health issues and then screw them up. ) than with Google. It really wasn't Google's fault.

First, I think it's a great place to start a career in software. If you come straight from school and have a reasonably open mind, you can learn a lot. Expectations will not be excessively high, which is why there are a trillion educational opportunities to

Keep reading

I worked at Google for 6 months in New York and had a terrible experience. That had more to do with my manager (so terrible that a recruiter I worked with, a year later, had heard of him; he had a pattern of using fake performance issues to unravel people's health issues and then screw them up. ) than with Google. It really wasn't Google's fault.

First, I think it's a great place to start a career in software. If you come straight from school and have a reasonably open mind, you can learn a lot. Expectations won't be excessively high, which is why there are a trillion educational opportunities to take advantage of (and you should). A couple of years at Google can go a long way for your resume. Your first project can be boring, but you just have to stick with it for 18 months and you'll have a better job and life than 99% of your classmates. It is much better than being an investment banking analyst. Even if you have trouble for projects (and you may not; some people are lucky, especially on Mt. View) 2-3 years at Google will open a lot of doors.

I also think Google is great if it has a national reputation in some software domain where Google excels. (I have a national reputation for being a loudmouth; that wouldn't count.) If you are a first-rate C ++ expert or have written foundational articles on natural language processing, Google is probably the best place in the world for you. to work. (Experience with things Google doesn't do well, like product management, won't help you.) Google doesn't really "respect" the ability of the 95-99.5 percentile (which is so common there) but it does respect the 99.9. percentile immensely, and you'll be able to dodge the tight allocation mess. You get the autonomy of the academy, as well as incredible resources, and you are in a company with incredibly smart people.

That covers talented but entry-level people and very well established people.

What about the middle of that spectrum, the "good, getting great" people (this is what I was, and still am) who generally land in the SWE 3, Mr. SWE, or Staff SWE ranks? I think it's not that good for them. You do a lot for your resume (unless you make the mistake of leaving after 6 months, like I did), but will usually assign you to projects a level or two below your capacity. You won't have to try too hard because Google is more talented than it knows what to do. Have you ever attended a conference on some amazing technology (say, Haskell) but realize, sadly, that only a third of people can use it for serious work? That will be every day in your peer group.

Google will have to dismantle its closed allocation, stack ranking, and performance industry complex regime if it is to be relevant in the 2020s, but it is far beyond my power if it will. This is not relevant to the question of whether one should accept a job at Google. I would say yes. I am a notorious detractor of Google, but if you land on a good project, even I will say that the place can be really cool. Stack ranking exists, but it is not as cruel as in other companies where one person from each team has to be criticized (which encourages teams to proactively confront an incompetent, that dynamic does not exist in Google). The guideline is "about 5%," but for a high-performing team with a good manager, everyone on that team is fine.

On the other hand: work in the Mt. View office if possible. Sure, Mountain View is suburban shit, but there's a huge gap in project quality between what MTV gets and what the rest of the offices get. (New York and Kirkland are in the middle; the rest is desert.) If you're going to Google, hang on and move to California.

So is it a good place to work as a software engineer? It largely depends on your manager, but if you draw a good one, then yes. Your odds are better at Mt. View, and you'll get the most bang for your buck if you're new or well advanced in your career; the medium is more uncertain (but you should still try it, because you may be lucky, and if you do, the payoff is incredible).

As an individual who has been hired by Apple, Google and Microsoft, I can tell you that those crazy salaries as you call them are totally insignificant and irrelevant if you want to become a millionaire.

These public companies and any other tech company offer other things to employees besides salary like company cars, free food, free yoga lessons, free tennis lessons and many other cool things like free phones, free tablets, free watches and free Microsoft Xbox One. .

However, the main reason someone works at Facebook or any other software company is OPTIONS.

Let me tell you

Keep reading

As an individual who has been hired by Apple, Google and Microsoft, I can tell you that those crazy salaries as you call them are totally insignificant and irrelevant if you want to become a millionaire.

These public companies and any other tech company offer other things to employees besides salary like company cars, free food, free yoga lessons, free tennis lessons and many other cool things like free phones, free tablets, free watches and free Microsoft Xbox One. .

However, the main reason someone works at Facebook or any other software company is OPTIONS.

Let me tell you about your options.

An option is a legal document that gives you the right, but not the obligation, to buy a share in the future for a specified price.

Let's say you work for Google, which currently sells its shares for $ 759.

Stocks are just pieces of paper and companies can print as many stocks as they want. It's exactly like printing your own cash for free.

They can print 1000 shares.

They can print 10,000 shares.

You can print 100,000 shares.

It does not matter.

They can print as many actions as they want.

Please note that each share is worth $ 759

If you are the CEO of Google and you need $ 759,000,000 to buy a new football stadium or whatever, you can simply print 1,000,000 new shares and give them to your broker and he will sell them on the open market for $ 759 each and now they can buy them. Stadium.

This is the road that you see every month that Facebook is buying Oculus for $ 2,000,000,000 and you can say "Wow. They are paying too much money for that company", but the reality is that they pay nothing and they acquired the company for free. They just printed a lot of stocks and used them as currency.

So, if you can print as many stocks as you want and use them as your own currency, then you can GIVE THEM out to all of your employees and that's exactly what is happening when you are given a few options.

However, if they give you $ 10,000,000 worth of Microsoft stock, then you would take all of your shares and sell them on the open market and then buy a mansion in Beverly Hills and live happily ever after without ever having to go back to work.

To prevent you from quitting, they offer you options instead of stocks. These options can be used, say, in 2021 and if you quit before that day, you get nothing, but if you work as hard as possible, you will get your shares in 2021.

Some of my co-workers have $ 100,000,000 in options.

Some of my co-workers have $ 10,000,000 in options.

Most secretaries have $ 1,000,000 in options.

Even the one who cleans the floors is a millionaire.

One of my coworkers still lives with his mom and eats free on campus and gets his paycheck and sometimes he doesn't even cash his checks for a few months because he's too busy writing code and not spending money.

His mother told me the other day that he had over a million dollars in uncashed checks right there in the bedroom.

How crazy is that?

Anyway, you work exclusively for your options.

I suggest you enroll at MIT.

They are the best school in the whole world if you want to become a software developer.

After that, I recommend an MBA from any Ivy League school.

They would hire you before you finish your MBA training.

The problem with these companies is that most of the kids who graduate from MIT are already millionaires and will never work for any company.

Most of them will start their own businesses.

There are not enough software developers around the world to meet the demand for these software companies.

It's not uncommon to receive a salary of $ 250,000 right out of college.

You can easily get a student visa to enter the United States of America and then you can get a job after finishing your MBA and they will take care of all the paperwork and then you can live here like any other American.

There is a bright future for you working for me.

It is very difficult to get a job at Google without a college degree.

Find a way.

Not even close.

"$ 150,000 base salary" = no chance

If you have Machine Learning or Deep Learning against data sets that are relevant to Google (they want immediate experience), then you could hit the base salary range of $ 150K. But to be a "SWE" on Google after college (even the doctors) will not pay you as much. However, if you have 8-10 years or more of experience as a lead engineer, say in Java, C, or Python, you can easily land in the basic $ 150K-200K range.

But back to the OP, a base salary of $ 150K- $ 200K with a fresh out of college PhD, almost no chance, the only chance is if you

Keep reading

Not even close.

"$ 150,000 base salary" = no chance

If you have Machine Learning or Deep Learning against data sets that are relevant to Google (they want immediate experience), then you could hit the base salary range of $ 150K. But to be a "SWE" on Google after college (even the doctors) will not pay you as much. However, if you have 8-10 years or more of experience as a lead engineer, say in Java, C, or Python, you can easily land in the basic $ 150K-200K range.

But back to the OP, a base salary of $ 150K- $ 200K with a PhD fresh out of college, almost no chance, the only possibility is if you are doing research (machine learning or deep learning) that fits something from Google. . are doing or are already doing about what they have not published a document (very, very low probability) and they want that experience.

Most of the time, Google waits 1 year or more AFTER you have a job somewhere to email you about a job. Why? They want to see if you can lead your own investigation rather than be led by your advisor. Even under this condition, I don't see many cases where there would be a base salary of $ 150K. Google pays pretty good bonuses (can vary a lot for people with the same position / title) and stocks ** (can vary a lot too), but the base salary, much like the banking industry, is lower to protect against years of income Lower.

** Also, stocks are consolidated for 4 years, so you won't see all that money unless you stick around 4 years to get all GSUs of that first year's stock. So you can't really count that money until you get it. If you want a reasonable expectation, even on MTV, for a base salary + bonus (aka money you will receive after 1 year), you could expect $ 110- $ 130k + $ 10- $ 40K bonus = $ 120K- $ 170K + 1/4 shares, but again, the remaining 3/4 of that share will not fully consolidate unless you stick another 3 years after the first year.

I just got my offer from Google as a software engineer fresh out of bachelor's degree starting in New York.

Year 1 Compensation: about 175K

This is where that number comes from:

  • 105k base salary
  • ~ 40,000 shares in the first year (250 Google shares granting 25% per year)
  • ~ 15k bonus in the first year (15% target bonus. Could go up or down)
  • 5k relocation bonus.
  • 9k to 401k (50% match if you invest a total of 18k)
  • A host of other benefits to add to your overall compensation package.

EDIT: Although I know you are not asking for advice, I will give you some anyway.

Don't just think about take-home pay when looking for work.

There

Keep reading

I just got my offer from Google as a software engineer fresh out of bachelor's degree starting in New York.

Year 1 Compensation: about 175K

This is where that number comes from:

  • 105k base salary
  • ~ 40,000 shares in the first year (250 Google shares granting 25% per year)
  • ~ 15k bonus in the first year (15% target bonus. Could go up or down)
  • 5k relocation bonus.
  • 9k to 401k (50% match if you invest a total of 18k)
  • A host of other benefits to add to your overall compensation package.

EDIT: Although I know you are not asking for advice, I will give you some anyway.

Don't just think about take-home pay when looking for work.

There are some important things to consider that should affect your decision

  • Make sure you think about the cost of living. While this offer sounds like a lot, it goes a lot further if I live in, say, Austin TX. (Cost of Living: How Much Will My Salary Go in Another City? - CNNMoney)

  • There is something affectionately called The Golden Handcuffs that you should be aware of. From wikipedia, these are "financial assets and benefits that are intended to encourage highly paid employees to stay within a company rather than move from one company to another." The idea is that after working a few years (about 4), you earn both in stock and base salary. The capture? It is valid for four years. If you leave the company, you will end up leaving around 450K on the table. This makes it very easy to convince yourself to stay with a company.
  • Some companies will compensate The Golden Handcuffs by offering bonus bonuses. The biggest I've seen is a 100k login bonus as a new hire.
  • Don't forget that bonuses are retained differently. From the comments on the post, it appears that your earnings will be withheld at the highest marginal rate (aka you were in the super rich tax bracket and made a lot of dollars). If you are in a lower tax bracket, you will not get the difference back until after you file your tax return. (Bonus Time: How the IRS Taxes and Treats Bonuses)
  • Don't forget to think about the fit of your equipment. In the end I chose based solely on this and actually left some money on the table in the long run to be paired with a killer team. I'm on a team that works with some of the best products from my company and works directly with the executive. That means I will ultimately have more visibility and career advancement if I do it right.

My wife works for Google. I earn about the same as last year at Mountain View. Last year we made about $ 390 thousand, we paid $ 112 thousand federal and $ 30 thousand state / local for a total effective tax rate of 36%. We recently moved from Maryland and can say that at our current income levels, the state / local tax would be $ 22K a year and probably similar to New York or a 2% savings. Seattle has no income tax, so your savings would likely be closer to 7%. CA also has an incredibly high sales tax, twice what New York has, but the same as Seattle.

I never lived in Zurich, but I heard that it is even more expensive than me.

Keep reading

My wife works for Google. I earn about the same as last year at Mountain View. Last year we made about $ 390 thousand, we paid $ 112 thousand federal and $ 30 thousand state / local for a total effective tax rate of 36%. We recently moved from Maryland and can say that at our current income levels, the state / local tax would be $ 22K a year and probably similar to New York or a 2% savings. Seattle has no income tax, so your savings would likely be closer to 7%. CA also has an incredibly high sales tax, twice what New York has, but the same as Seattle.

I never lived in Zurich, but I heard that it is even more expensive than the mountain view, which I can hardly believe.

In any case, Mountain View is likely the place you want to be if you work for Google. You have a lot more promotion options there and the ability to jump internally if you find yourself on the wrong side of the ladder. New York has quite a few options too, but whether it's a good fit will depend on the team you want to work for. Taxes are not enough to make or break your decision. Choosing the job that best suits your needs will easily make up for any differences. If you are unsure, you want to be at headquarters to optimize your earning potential. That said, the cost of housing is going to screw you like a fool in Mountain View. Manhattan is also expensive but you can commute from out of town and spend half of what you would in the Bay Area, which is expensive practically everywhere, almost regardless of the commute. Housing costs us about $ 24,000 more in the Bay Area than in New York. So 75% of our additional costs here come from housing. That is truly what will make a difference for you, especially if you are looking for the long term and will want to buy a home one day. You may not be able to do that in Mountain View without a lot of compromises.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.