What is the salary comparison between New York and Singapore? How much should you earn in Singapore to live the same lifestyle as in New York?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Spencer Fisher



What is the salary comparison between New York and Singapore? How much should you earn in Singapore to live the same lifestyle as in New York?

I recently moved to Singapore after living in Manhattan for five years.

First of all, you cannot replicate the New York lifestyle in Singapore. Singapore doesn't have Broadway or Lincoln Center or MSG or Yankees Stadium, etc. The art scene in Singapore is nowhere near that league. While the food options in Singapore are great, it doesn't have the density of high-end restaurants in the league of The Modern, Gramercy Tavern, Le Cou Cou, etc. The equivalent of Whole Foods does not exist. You can't take a train out of town to visit craft fairs, go hiking, buy antiques, or

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I recently moved to Singapore after living in Manhattan for five years.

First of all, you cannot replicate the New York lifestyle in Singapore. Singapore doesn't have Broadway or Lincoln Center or MSG or Yankees Stadium, etc. The art scene in Singapore is nowhere near that league. While the food options in Singapore are great, it doesn't have the density of high-end restaurants in the league of The Modern, Gramercy Tavern, Le Cou Cou, etc. The equivalent of Whole Foods does not exist. You can't take a train out of town to visit craft fairs, go hiking, buy antiques, or pick apples, etc. Singapore is very, very small.

You have to adapt and adapt to a new lifestyle.

Second, a lot depends on your tax situation. If you are not a US citizen or green card holder, your after-tax income in Singapore (assuming you only pay Singapore tax) will be significantly higher than in the US, even if your salary is still the same. In other words, you will have more disposable income.

So with these two caveats in mind, the differences are generally as follows:

Housing - Rent in Singapore is cheaper than in Manhattan, assuming you are not looking for fancy private property but are willing to live among the locals in public housing (and public housing in Singapore is unimaginably better than public housing in Manhattan, nearly 80% of Singaporeans live in public housing on long-term leases for 99 years). Even private property can be cheaper and definitely cheaper than in Manhattan. It is almost unheard of to have an apartment in Singapore without a washing machine, and apartments without a lift are rare. The cost varies depending on the type of home and also the location.

Transportation: Since you live in Manhattan, I assume you don't have a car. In Singapore, you don't need to own a car either, but if you do, it is ridiculously expensive to own and drive a car in Singapore. Taxes on taxes and charges on charges. Do not do it. Take Grab (the equivalent of Uber) and the Singapore subway is amazing compared to the shitty MTA. Public transportation here is clean, efficient, and ridiculously cheap for a developed city.

Telecom / Internet: Much cheaper in Singapore than in Manhattan (at least against major service providers like T Mobile, Verizon, etc.). You can get a monthly data telecommunications plan for half or less what you pay in Manhattan. The same goes for the Internet.

Food: If you need to limit yourself to salads and sandwiches and western meals, Singapore isn't cheap (and frankly not as good as what you get in Manhattan). If you have to eat organic, it is even worse. If you're adventurous and willing to eat local food, your lunch can cost as little as USD3 for a bowl of noodles. If you need your western cuisine, it can be closer to $ 10 (and probably more) for lunch. Which is what I used to spend for lunch in Midtown shopping at a food truck. Singapore restaurants and food stalls don't charge higher prices for the same dishes just because you buy at dinner instead of lunch.

Alcohol: Alcohol in Singapore is very expensive. There's a growing craft beer scene, and wine and whiskeys are popular, but the amount of tax levied on them means they are incredibly expensive to consume. Even a very mediocre cocktail can cost $ 15. I've heard of $ 3 gin and tonics during happy hour. Avoid them.

Water - expensive. Don't rent a place in Singapore with a bathtub and take frequent baths, just take a shower. You will pay for that water.

Things are expensive in Singapore compared to the US: Your home appliances such as televisions, audio equipment, air purifiers, as well as anything imported from the US will be much more expensive than in the US. Clothing, furniture, etc. they are also more expensive.

Human labor is cheaper: your plumber, electrician, painter, housekeeper, etc. they are much cheaper in the US.

I am aware that I did not answer your question directly, but I hope you realize from the above how impossible it can be to pin down a number. It depends on your tax situation and your own lifestyle choice.

One of my friends, Mr. Junus Tan from Singapore, said that the standard of living of the Singaporean people is very high, but so is the struggle. Junus Tan said that they are earning well, but the cost of living is also very high. That is why they have a lower savings rate. Therefore, to have a good savings rate and maintain their standard of living, Singaporeans need more income .. Junus Tan Said.

http://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/compare_cities.jsp?country1=United+States&country2=Singapore&city1=New+York%2C+NY&city2=Singapore

I will assume you are a foreigner and as such you will not have CPF deductions and the 9000 of that amount will be taken home. . I will also assume that you will agree not to have a car (not really necessary in super-connected Singapore) and that your children have no special needs. I don't know where you come from that considers ages 3 and 1 to go to school, not in Singapore.

So doing the basic necessities.

  1. The 3 bedroom rental apartment can range from $ 3000- $ 7000 per month depending on location and type.
  2. Expect to pay approximately $ 300 a month or less (likely) for electricity, water, and gas for cooking. If you need air conditioning
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I will assume you are a foreigner and as such you will not have CPF deductions and the 9000 of that amount will be taken home. . I will also assume that you will agree not to have a car (not really necessary in super-connected Singapore) and that your children have no special needs. I don't know where you come from that considers ages 3 and 1 to go to school, not in Singapore.

So doing the basic necessities.

  1. The 3 bedroom rental apartment can range from $ 3000- $ 7000 per month depending on location and type.
  2. Expect to pay approximately $ 300 a month or less (likely) for electricity, water, and gas for cooking. If you need air conditioning every day, you can slightly exceed this figure.
  3. Transport. I will assume that you have to work and that at least 2 children must travel to school every day. If you take the bus or subway, you should be comfortable at $ 300 a month or less. If children walk to school like many in Singapore, half.
  4. Edibles will vary widely. If you can adapt to using common items locally, you can easily get by on $ 800 a month.
  5. Lunch can range from $ 4 at a local hawker or kopitiam to a $ 6 + sandwich on the subway and $ 15 ++ at a simple bistro.
  6. School fees: Your 10- and 8-year-old children would qualify for elementary school if you choose to enroll in the local school system. Expect to pay around $ 800 per month per child. If you choose to go to IB international schools, they range from 25,000 to 40,000 per year per child.
  7. Childcare: That's what the 3-year-old would go to if he felt inclined. It would be in the range of 1000 a month to 2000 a month, but there is a world of variation in the types of preschoolers and hours of care in Singapore. But if you want 1.8k month, you will get care from 7 to. M. A 7 p. M., From Monday to Friday and from 7 to 11 Saturdays.
  8. Entertainment: Suppose you go out as a family once a week, 2 taxi rides from one place to another, and perhaps the entrance to the Singapore Zoo with a plan of lunch and dinner to spend $ 250. Obviously, going to the park or the library will cost a fraction of this.

In conclusion, 9000 is very doable, but it really depends on your expectations and lifestyle. You can check the price of almost anything at Shopee Singapore | Buy everything at Shopee or Qoo10: it offers you the best, even food through http://redmart.lazada.sg Consult milk, diapers, etc.

Alcohol and cigarettes are heavily taxed, so consider it if it's a big part of your life now. I answered the question to the best of my ability based on the few details provided, if you added your current standard of living you might get a fair comparison from someone.

I assume you are an expat, there are 2 ways to do it. If you plan to live as an expat, it will not be enough. If you live like the locals, it would be enough to get you some savings.

At 7,000 sgd, your tax bill is tied to 15% or the resident tax rate, whichever is higher you can afford for 12 months. That's roughly 1k lost every month if you decide to pay in installments.

Housing, from the amount of 3K if you decide to stay in a condominium. If you decide to stay in an urbanization, a 4 bedroom home will easily be under 3K. It depends on your preference.

The car will be the second largest item on your paycheck,

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I assume you are an expat, there are 2 ways to do it. If you plan to live as an expat, it will not be enough. If you live like the locals, it would be enough to get you some savings.

At 7,000 sgd, your tax bill is tied to 15% or the resident tax rate, whichever is higher you can afford for 12 months. That's roughly 1k lost every month if you decide to pay in installments.

Housing, from the amount of 3K if you decide to stay in a condominium. If you decide to stay in an urbanization, a 4 bedroom home will easily be under 3K. It depends on your preference.

The car will be the second largest item on your paycheck, I would not recommend buying a car in Singapore with that paycheck. A nissan that costs over 100k for a new car, or a second hand car at 30-100k. (Figures of the ball park). I feel like it's just bad debt to incur. You will spend between 1 and 1.5k / month just on the car. Public transportation is good enough with private rental readily available. I myself used to earn more than 7, but I don't dare to buy a car (fortunately with the covid).

So far that's 1 + 3 + 1.5 = 5.5k out of pocket.

grocery is about 200 to 250 (depending on where you shop) a week. Another 1k missing.

Dining at restaurants will cost you between 50-100 per head for mid-range restaurants. $ 30 (10 / head) if you eat in cafeterias and street vending centers. So, assuming you eat twice a month at mid-range restaurants (2x75x3) and the rest at the street vendor center (30x4)

That is around 570 missing.

5500 + 1000 + 570 = $ 7070.

So, based on somewhat conservative ballpark figures, you have run out of budget.

During the last 10 years, I have lived in 5 cities. 3 of them are Singapore, San Francisco and New York (the other two are Hong Kong and Shanghai), so I think I am qualified to answer this question: from taxes to food to transportation to entertainment.


Tldr? Here is the summary

Singapore will save you more money if you can live on local food and go out less often (because there isn't much out there). SF, you will save more than in New York precisely because you are a tech worker who does not go out or is always looking for free food and drink. New York you spend more money and drink all the time and live in a smaller area.

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During the last 10 years, I have lived in 5 cities. 3 of them are Singapore, San Francisco and New York (the other two are Hong Kong and Shanghai), so I think I am qualified to answer this question: from taxes to food to transportation to entertainment.


Tldr? Here is the summary

Singapore will save you more money if you can live on local food and go out less often (because there isn't much out there). SF, you will save more than in New York precisely because you are a tech worker who does not go out or is always looking for free food and drink. In New York you spend more money and drink all the time and live in a smaller apartment and always buy drinks at that bar with Brazilian models.

Therefore, the cost of living is reflected in what you do and what each city offers.


Suppose the salary is the same everywhere, which is not the case, since San Francisco in the tech industry or New York in the media or finance industry will always be higher than Singapore (unless you work for a fund of coverage in Singapore, so it's comparable to New York)

Taxes: you can't talk about cost of living without taking taxes into account. Personal income tax is the lowest in Singapore and you will probably only pay 1/3 of what you will pay in the US (US has social security, Medicare, state and federal taxes). Now Singapore has CPF, but unlike the US social security, Singapore more or less matches your contribution and works more like a matching IRA, so it's a good business to save.

Living and Living Expenses: Singapore is 20% to 30% cheaper than New York City Manhattan (assuming you have a doorman-style building), but less convenient. In New York, there are food and corner stores everywhere, Singapore is quiet at night, and except for 7-11, most places have just closed. Didn't I mention alcohol too? San Francisco is actually 10% lower than New York these days, but since San Francisco doesn't have standard units like New York, the rent will be comparable to New York and higher than Singapore.

Food - For Singapore, if you can live like the locals and eat at the street vendor hub (mainly Southeast Asian food), Singapore food will be much cheaper. Even 50% cheaper than a burritos in SF or NYC.

However, for air-conditioned table food and non-Southeast Asian quality food, it is somewhat comparable to New York, but due to the crazy US tipping system (~ 20% now). after taxes and tips, New York is 10-20% higher and SF is 5-10% higher.

However, when it comes to variety, New York continues to beat Singapore. From Polish food to Peruvian chicken and lamb skewer on the street, it doesn't get better than New York (with the exception of Southeast Asian food). New York's Indian food is comparable to Singapore's Little India.

The variety of SF food would be less than New York, but SF makes up for it if you're into tech and walking downtown to all kinds of gathering events for free hotel-quality food. The rise of technology makes all meals free and there are free product launch events everywhere; this has already happened for the last 2-3 years. Yes, I know it sounds like a tech bubble.

To buy food at home to cook, Singapore food is the most expensive of the three places. New York supermarkets and street vendors are not cheap, but they are still cheaper than Singapore. San Francisco has the cheapest supermarket food. Take, for example, avocado. you would be paid 3 usd in Singapore (cold storage or fair price), 1.50–2 in the New York street vendor and 1–1.25 in San Francisco (Safeway or smart & final). Not to mention, America has Costco.

Transportation: Among the three cities, New York is the most connected (but the dirtiest), Singapore follows and San Francisco is the last. The New York subway runs 24 hours a day and you can walk from station to station without breaking a sweat. Good luck in Singapore as the station is far away in the 30 ° C summer heat. San Francisco you have to call Uber or muni and you need a car. SF BART is primarily a joke.

The cost of transportation is still cheaper in Singapore than in New York or San Francisco, with San Francisco costing the most.

Entertainment: Singapore is still a boring city (even with casinos) with few nightclubs, if that's your thing. There are no secret bars or clubs in the basement like New York. Also, the alcohol tax is very high in Singapore, so there is no hole for cheap drinking. You are likely to spend more money in Singapore to go to clubs than in New York or San Francisco because of the alcohol tax. However, due to the tax, there are also less interesting places in Singapore to go, so you can save money on, well, not going out (I think that's the point for Singapore's nanny state government - make sure people go out less at night)

Between nyc and sf, nyc still has more interesting bars and clubs than SF, not to mention the hottest guys and girls for people watching, as nyc is an international model city.

I would make a comparison with Shanghai and Hong Kong, but the post is already too long.

Timothy has given an amazing answer, so I'll add it quickly. Singapore is one of those strange countries where it can be incredibly expensive or very affordable.

If your payment package is correct, it will make enough money in a month for some families to last a year, so that's something to compare. But that's not the point I'm trying to make.

What I'm trying to say is how expensive Singapore is, it depends on how you live in this country. Partygoers will find us insanely expensive, but beach bums will find affordable flights to 'exotic' Asian beaches that will bring their family down.

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Timothy has given an amazing answer, so I'll add it quickly. Singapore is one of those strange countries where it can be incredibly expensive or very affordable.

If your payment package is correct, it will make enough money in a month for some families to last a year, so that's something to compare. But that's not the point I'm trying to make.

What I'm trying to say is how expensive Singapore is, it depends on how you live in this country. Partygoers will find us incredibly expensive, but beach bums will find affordable flights to "exotic" Asian beaches that will have their family salivating at home.

Bali, Phuket, Patong, Cebu, to name just a few, are within a 4 hour flight radius. And if you don't mind the flight budget, prices start at £ 30 on a good day.

The most expensive issue in this country is accommodation. Depending on your gender, ethnicity, preferences and ego, the rental prices between a city, a 'close to town' condo and a suburban condo or even HDB will be very different. All for an additional 20 to 30 minute ride and the "prestige" of living close to the city.

If you are being transferred, I suggest that you speak to your local colleagues about what they think before making a decision about where to stay, assuming of course that you have decided to come.

Cars - Everyone knows that cars are incredibly expensive in Singapore. So I suggest you don't drive. It doesn't make sense unless your job requires it. But most companies won't explicitly state it. They only give you an additional transportation allowance if they need you to drive. But if you don't get compensated for that, Uber and Grab are everywhere. Pushing is the best approach. It's usually cheap, fast, and brainless.

Last is the food. People of Asian ethnicities will find food cheap and widely available. Westerners will usually find the quality of their homemade products limited in mass supermarkets, or expensive in specialty grocery stores. But they are there and available.

If you like going out to eat, we are essentially food heaven BUT once again, high quality western food tends to be expensive. Local or Asian food is very affordable. Therefore, there. How do you want to live?

SGD7000 is more than enough.

You can rent a room for yourself at about 600-800 or the entire unit for about 2k + depending on the number of rooms and whether it is HDB or condos.

If you intend to save, you may want to rent a room for yourself, which is what many foreign workers do. Alternatively, rent a full HDB unit with your friends / colleagues (all female if you wish).

this will leave you with around $ 4 to $ 5,000 a month, which is higher than many of the foreign and local workers.

If you eat all meals including breakfast it should only cost you about SGD20 with a rat

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SGD7000 is more than enough.

You can rent a room for yourself at about 600-800 or the entire unit for about 2k + depending on the number of rooms and whether it is HDB or condos.

If you intend to save, you may want to rent a room for yourself, which is what many foreign workers do. Alternatively, rent a full HDB unit with your friends / colleagues (all female if you wish).

this will leave you with around $ 4 to $ 5,000 a month, which is higher than many of the foreign and local workers.

If you eat all meals including breakfast it should only cost you about SGD20 with a wide variety of options, unless you are eating at some restaurant all the time and if that is the case it is not as possible to budget for you. .

20 x 30 = 600, but let's set 1k for the cost you want to eat right on the weekends.

The cost of a typical phone plan ranges from 50 to 100.

typical public transportation would be roughly another 100-150

If we take everything at the higher end and add some allowance to it, your daily expenses would cost you only about 1.5k a month. That includes buying bubble tea, donating money to a few people on the streets, an occasional good meal on weekdays, a few trips here and there.

If you rent a room instead, your monthly overhead would be about 2.3k and that's on the higher end. Most of the foreign workers I am friends with spend less than 2.3k.

I would easily have 3.7k to save monthly. Even if you spend 1.5k on leisure, it is still a good monthly saving of 2.2k, which is more than 25% of your salary.

Is S $ 13,000 a good income for a family of 3 (child is 2.5 years old) as an expat from India? In India, we both worked and lived luxurious lives with maids, cooks, and a chauffeured car.

Well, if you get a job that offers $ 13,000 in Singapore, then it is a great opportunity and you will surely be able to live comfortably. But let me tell you that getting a maid (in Singapore, we call it a helper) is difficult. Sometimes they don't show up and most of them have a pretty high pay. The standard of living in Singapore is much higher than in India. So with $ 13,000

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Is S $ 13,000 a good income for a family of 3 (child is 2.5 years old) as an expat from India? In India, we both worked and lived luxurious lives with maids, cooks, and a chauffeured car.

Well, if you get a job that offers $ 13,000 in Singapore, then it is a great opportunity and you will surely be able to live comfortably. But let me tell you that getting a maid (in Singapore, we call it a helper) is difficult. Sometimes they don't show up and most of them have a pretty high pay. The standard of living in Singapore is much higher than in India. So, at $ 13,000, don't expect luxuries like chauffeured cars and the like. Just hope for a comfortable life for your family. Again you have a small child at home. You need to get the child admitted to a good child care center with a toddler-friendly curriculum like Camelot. Spending on the child's education is as important as having a comfortable life.

Singapore is a place where there are many opportunities. So, as you develop professionally, it is also important to develop your child in the field of education. The schools in Singapore for expats are all renowned international schools, if the child can have a chance then his whole life is done, but the springboard is preschool. Make sure you go for Camelot or something on par with Camelot child care as the best teaching staff could guide you on which school would be suitable for children and also what your child's strengths and weaknesses are. These evaluations are mandatory before you decide to admit your child to a good school.

Buy a cheap bike and ride it when you can, it can also save you gym membership and give you exercise and maybe even lose weight.

I use ammonia instead of laundry detergent as it is cheap and kills germs and odors. Air dry instead of paying for a washing machine, it's easier on your clothes and good for the environment. I ironed my own shirts instead of using dry cleaners

library for books, movies

Find what's cheap in your neighborhood and take advantage of it so you don't feel so deprived. For me it was a great prix fixe lunch, a cheap movie theater, cheap cooked chicken at the grocery store. I paid $ 1 at the Met sometimes in

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Buy a cheap bike and ride it when you can, it can also save you gym membership and give you exercise and maybe even lose weight.

I use ammonia instead of laundry detergent as it is cheap and kills germs and odors. Air dry instead of paying for a washing machine, it's easier on your clothes and good for the environment. I ironed my own shirts instead of using dry cleaners

library for books, movies

Find what's cheap in your neighborhood and take advantage of it so you don't feel so deprived. For me it was a great prix fixe lunch, a cheap movie theater, cheap cooked chicken at the grocery store. I paid $ 1 at the Met sometimes in loose change. A dive bar had cheap beer and free hot dogs that I would tip $ 1 each.

I worked at a company that had leftover meals for corporate meetings, had breakfast there for the free milk (they had leftovers beyond what I used), got free coffee and sodas there too

Volunteer usher to see plays, musicals

In my opinion, 6000 SGD is more than enough for a single person to feel happy in Singapore. For the most part, you will only spend on the following:

Room rent: 800 - 1000 (Rent a room instead of a house. You can save a lot of money)

PUB: 50 - 75 (Most of the time the internet and PUB charges are included in the rent. If you buy a broadband connection separately, it can be expensive)

Mobile phone: 60 - 70

Food: $ 20 per day. So the average is $ 600 a month.

Travel: approximately $ 150.

Therefore, your total expenses in a month would normally be around SGD 2,000. You would have 4000 SGD to spend on yourself

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In my opinion, 6000 SGD is more than enough for a single person to feel happy in Singapore. For the most part, you will only spend on the following:

Room rent: 800 - 1000 (Rent a room instead of a house. You can save a lot of money)

PUB: 50 - 75 (Most of the time the internet and PUB charges are included in the rent. If you buy a broadband connection separately, it can be expensive)

Mobile phone: 60 - 70

Food: $ 20 per day. So the average is $ 600 a month.

Travel: approximately $ 150.

Therefore, your total expenses in a month would normally be around SGD 2,000. You would have 4000 SGD to spend generously each month.

It is difficult to answer this question because the word "comfortable" is subjective. But with this salary

  • you can rent a 2 bedroom condo for 2.5k or a 3 bedroom condo for 3k per month (option: rent hdb for cheaper rental)
  • send your child to private school for 1.5k to 3k per month (option: send to public school but need luck and some skill to get in for foreigners)
  • utilities, internet, telephone for 500 per month
  • helper from 900 to 1100 taxes included per month
  • Taxes at 10%
  • the remainder for groceries, entertainment, out-of-coverage dining, healthcare costs and savings

You can decide if you are comfortable with it

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It is difficult to answer this question because the word "comfortable" is subjective. But with this salary

  • you can rent a 2 bedroom condo for 2.5k or a 3 bedroom condo for 3k per month (option: rent hdb for cheaper rental)
  • send your child to private school for 1.5k to 3k per month (option: send to public school but need luck and some skill to get in for foreigners)
  • utilities, internet, telephone for 500 per month
  • helper from 900 to 1100 taxes included per month
  • Taxes at 10%
  • the remainder for groceries, entertainment, out-of-coverage dining, healthcare costs and savings

You can decide if you are comfortable with this.

Many foreign residents and employees can live comfortably on less.

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