What is the pension of an army officer with colonel rank in India?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Sara Gray



What is the pension of an army officer with colonel rank in India?

I am a Lieutenant Colonel (veteran) and I am drawing about 81000, however I receive about 63,000 on hand after IT and the commuted amount. A full Col will draw about 7k extra.

This is unrelated to the question, but the thought could share it with you. Commissioned on June 12, 1960 as second lieutenant, my gross salary was 450 rupees per month. Twenty rupees were deducted from the loan taken for some articles of clothing provided by the academy, such as a suit and other minor things. That left me with Rs 430 / -. Some taxes and finally one got princely 393 rupees in the bank. I retired prematurely as a colonel about 32 years ago, my salary was around £ 4,000 a month. In fact, times have changed…. Good luck to this generation.

For colonels who retired until December 31, 2015 aged 31 or over, the service pension will be Rs 94,750 / - plus 9% of the personal expenses allowance (before January 1, 19, this will increase again) minus the value of the commuted pension, if applicable. Generally, this switching value will be around 17000 / - (this resets after 15 years).

For those who retire before January 31, 2017, it will be much more.

A colonel after serving for 20 years and retiring in 2019, will collect a pension of approximately Rs 96k (see the notice of the chief controller of defense (officers) accounts published regarding the pension dated July 1, 2017 )

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Friend, I am answering the question answered by a col who told you, because of the new pay commission you receive before 98000, you would only receive 18000 per month.

It totally depends on the 50% of the last extracted emoluments, which include the basic payment and the MSP.

After that, to get to the Monthly Pension, we must understand the Basic Pension and the Residual Pension.

For this I have answered separately

Generally, the pension is half of the last payment drawn. Salary increases, due to the addition of the inflation-based famine allowance, are also automatically added to the pension.

Yes, a LT colonel greets a colonel.

As a recruit in the United States Navy, we were taught to salute all officers.

Actually, there is a "general order" about this. The tenth general order is:

Greet all officers and all colors and banners that are not draped.

I have many stories related to this salute business ... When approaching an officer while walking in the open air, a Marine must "do a proper 6-10 step handshake."

In addition, there is the verbal greeting; "Good morning, afternoon, evening, sir (or madam)"

We had so much fun waving. Especially if a male officer was in the company of a female officer

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Yes, a LT colonel greets a colonel.

As a recruit in the United States Navy, we were taught to salute all officers.

Actually, there is a "general order" about this. The tenth general order is:

Greet all officers and all colors and banners that are not draped.

I have many stories related to this salute business ... When approaching an officer while walking in the open air, a Marine must "do a proper 6-10 step handshake."

In addition, there is the verbal greeting; "Good morning, afternoon, evening, sir (or madam)"

We had so much fun waving. Especially if a male officer was in the company of a female officer. "Good afternoon, ladies!" or "Good morning, gentlemen!"

As soldiers, we could take refuge in ignorance and act innocent - LMFAO - when the inevitable butt chewing began….

It was also fun to salute the Gunny (or First Sergeant, Master Gunnery Sergeant, etc.) and hear him growl; Fuck off! I work for a living! Don't say hello to me, sheep morons! "

Sometimes they would turn the tables and grab us for an officer-land task force ... or a Color Guard detachment. "Oh? We like to say hello, right ??…".

UPS….

Eventually, I became a noncommissioned officer (noncommissioned officer) and called for a cessation and desisted from my previous hello antics. I could no longer take refuge in ignorance or act innocent. I couldn't be a know-it-all anymore. I had crossed over.

::Sigh::

Instead, he now had the authority to chew on some butt and assign clever details to details ...

At USMC, while wearing the blue Alpha, Bravo, Charlie, Delta, or Dress uniform, enlisted men wear rank insignia on their sleeves. Officers wear their insignia of rank on their neck or shoulder pad.

If there is no insignia on the sleeve, then it is a soldier (e1) or an officer.

Most officers wear very "square" uniforms. Number one, officers can afford the constant replacement of worn out uniforms and insignia, ribbons, insignia, etc., better than a soldier. Two, officers can pay professional tailors and cleaners to maintain their uniforms more easily than enlisted men / women.

Imagine my IRE as a noncommissioned officer when I approached a polished sleeved Navy "trooper" who looked like he had slept in his Charlie uniform, ridden hard, and hung up wet.

I mean, this uniform was so wrinkled that LT. Colombo would have been ashamed of it.

Also, his non-tailored pants were "high water" and he was missing a belt loop at the back.

Dirty Belt - The seat of the pants looked like it had shitted at some point, a long time ago.

This Marine looked like "Joe-shit ... The Rag Man."

I walked up behind him and started chewing on his ass for the Un-sitting appearance.

He turned around ... and time slowed down in that strange way that sometimes happens ...

The Major, who was next to him, started yelling at me that I had missed a greeting.

At that moment I realized that the soldier's bag of shit had a star around its neck.

He was a USMC Brigadier General! Awww, FAK!

Well now I'm screwed… I can do it too… so the General made Gunny Hartman's whole ass chew. From me, a Navy Petty Officer (E4) at the time.

He was waving and chewing on his ass at the same time.

"How dare you walk around in MY Marine Corps uniform looking like a shit sack, General !?"

I knew it was over, so what the hell? Right?

The general laughed. He looked at his aide-de-camp, a second LT, and said; "See? I told you that no one would say anything except a sergeant or less!"

“You many Smacks can kiss my ass! That's all you're good at, it's ass kissing! Especially you Senior! All morning nobody said shit! It took a corporal to call me! Come on Corporal, let's have lunch at the officers' club, a present from me, after I change ... "

This is how I, a mere corporal of the marines, came to sit to the right of the General to have lunch at the Officers' club, to the envy of all the officers present.

And all this started with a lost greeting….

::Affected smile::

One Rank One Pension (OROP) is a pension reform movement for personnel in the Indian armed forces. To understand this, let me briefly explain how pensions work for government employees in India.

My dad retired last month from a government bank. Your pension is 50% of the salary you received at the end of last month. This pension is then increased each year to take inflation into account. When my father's junior employee retires in 10 years, he will probably receive a much higher pension than my father's because the salary at the end of his service could be higher and the pension is 50% of that salary. Salaries can gro

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One Rank One Pension (OROP) is a pension reform movement for personnel in the Indian armed forces. To understand this, let me briefly explain how pensions work for government employees in India.

My dad retired last month from a government bank. Your pension is 50% of the salary you received at the end of last month. This pension is then increased each year to take inflation into account. When my father's junior employee retires in 10 years, he will probably receive a much higher pension than my father's because the salary at the end of his service could be higher and the pension is 50% of that salary. Salaries can grow much faster than inflation in government. This may be a bit unfair since both my dad and that person would have served the same number of years in the bank and in the same rank.

This problem can be much more critical in the military, where rank and prestige matter a lot. A General who retired in 1980 after 30 years of service could be receiving a much lower pension than a Major who retired in 2015 after 20 years of service. The general served the country longer and at a higher rank. Why should you receive a lower pension just because you retired in 1980?

The One Rank, One Pension reform would allow a General who retired in 1980 to receive the same pension as a General who retired in 2015 serving the same number of years in the military. This is especially necessary in the military, where soldiers retire much younger and cannot easily switch to other careers or earn a living wage from the pension.

So far so good. What is the fault? In fact, the RFMO existed until 1973. The problem is that it requires a lot of money 8,300 crore / year and more. For each salary increase of the existing forces, all previous retirees also have to get a raise. As Indians live longer, this means that the government has to pay pensions to each person for decades at rapidly increasing rates. And more. When it is implemented for the military, other government employees, starting with the paramilitaries, will also ask for it. Since it is a few billion rupees, all governments are dragging their feet.

Assume the following to calculate the minimum wage for an army officer who is a colonel in the Indian army.

  1. They got a promotion when you read this.
  2. He is stationed in a city like New Delhi.
  3. It does not receive a technical subsidy. Technical assignment is allowable for those officers who have joined the Indian Army through officer technical entry.
  4. Live in government-provided accommodation. Therefore, you do not receive the rental subsidy for the house.
  5. He has not done defense services personnel college.
  6. He has not done postgraduate courses.
  7. Receive transportation subsidy.
  8. The subsidy for household costs will be taken as 17 pe
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Assume the following to calculate the minimum wage for an army officer who is a colonel in the Indian army.

  1. They got a promotion when you read this.
  2. He is stationed in a city like New Delhi.
  3. It does not receive a technical subsidy. Technical assignment is allowable for those officers who have joined the Indian Army through officer technical entry.
  4. Live in government-provided accommodation. Therefore, you do not receive the rental subsidy for the house.
  5. He has not done defense services personnel college.
  6. He has not done postgraduate courses.
  7. Receive transportation subsidy.
  8. The subsidy for personal expenses will be taken as 17 percent as of January 14, 2020 (the subsidy for personal expenses increases with the increase in the inflation rate. This causes the salary to vary).
  9. He does not take portions. Therefore, upon receiving the ration money.

IMAGE SOURCE: MENS XP Magazine

The officer will draw the following based on Level 13 of the pay band matrix based on the 7th central pay commission applicable from July 1, 2016.

  1. Basic Pay - 130600 + MSP (15500) = Rupees 1,46,100
  2. Payment expense allowance: Rs 22,202 (calculated on 17 per cent as of January 14, 2020
  3. Ration money: approximately 3,500 rupees (ration money is according to authorization and is added to the famine allowance).
  4. Transport allowance: Rs 8,424 as of January 14, 2020

Therefore, the minimum wage that an Indian Army colonel will earn is Rs 1,80,226. This salary increases further depending on the postgraduate assignment if you have done postgraduate studies, the technical assignment if you are a technical officer, various types of field assignment if you are stationed in difficult areas, getting the house rental allowance that is from 18 percent to 30 percent of the Basic Payment depending on the classification of the city in which you are or reside. In addition, the number of years of service in the specific rank also varies the salary. If an officer has served more years as a Colonel, his salary will be higher than the figure I have highlighted.

If almost 80% of IPS officers can retire as IG / ADGP / DGP who have some parity or equivalency with the army ranks, what went wrong with the promotion of Army officers? Why can't they reach the rank of Maj Gen / Lt Gen in their career and are instead forced to retire in the ranks of Colonel and Lt Col? Have you ever thought about the reason behind the same thing? The reason the organization (Service HQ) gives you is that the promotion system in the military is like a pyramid. True, but who deliberately created this pyramid? It is the army and the Ministry of Defense together. From 1984 to 2004, there was no ca

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If almost 80% of IPS officers can retire as IG / ADGP / DGP who have some parity or equivalency with the army ranks, what went wrong with the promotion of Army officers? Why can't they reach the rank of Maj Gen / Lt Gen in their career and are instead forced to retire in the ranks of Colonel and Lt Col? Have you ever thought about the reason behind the same thing? The reason the organization (Service HQ) gives you is that the promotion system in the military is like a pyramid. True, but who deliberately created this pyramid? It is the army and the Ministry of Defense together. From 1984 to 2004, no cadre restructuring or revision was carried out in the armed forces. That means no promotion prospects for Army officers or deliberate delay in conducting promotion boards citing the reason for the lack of vacancies. And, this suited the higher ups in the army: they deliberately did not want additional vacancies to be created for the simple reason that it would dilute their own powers. Now look at the current situation: additional vacancies have been created and cadres in the armed forces are on par or nearly on par with the civil services in terms of promotion and career prospects. path. Additional vacancies have been created and cadres in the armed forces are on par or nearly on par with the civil services in terms of promotion and career prospects. path. Additional vacancies have been created and cadres in the armed forces are on par or nearly on par with the civil services in terms of promotion and career prospects. path.

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