What is the most reliable way to earn at least $ 250,000 / year within 8 years of graduation with a bachelor's degree in computer science?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by George Gray



What is the most reliable way to earn at least $ 250,000 / year within 8 years of graduation with a bachelor's degree in computer science?

I will answer this with the same advice that I have given to my children. First of all, forget about your degree in Computer Science. I did that and then went to graduate school in computer science. Worthless.

The only way to make real wealth is to ditch your salary. In a salary, by definition, you are creating wealth for others and you are creating a chain and handcuffs for yourself.

Some people like that, but it's not the way to make $ 250,000 a year or whatever you want to earn (why would you choose $ 250,000?).

I'm on the board of directors of a billion-revolution employment agency. I can tell you the facts: income is going down relative to

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I will answer this with the same advice that I have given to my children. First of all, forget about your degree in Computer Science. I did that and then went to graduate school in computer science. Worthless.

The only way to make real wealth is to ditch your salary. In a salary, by definition, you are creating wealth for others and you are creating a chain and handcuffs for yourself.

Some people like that, but it's not the way to make $ 250,000 a year or whatever you want to earn (why would you choose $ 250,000?).

I'm on the board of directors of a billion-revolution employment agency. I can tell you the facts: Income is going down relative to inflation for 40 years in a row. And the entire middle class is being fired. I don't mean this in a scary way. It's just the facts right now. Maybe it will change. I hope so but I doubt it.

I'm not even suggesting going out and starting a business. Running a business is a very painful job. Employees have sex with each other and customers want bribes and the shows don't work on demos.

More than half of the unemployed have college degrees (another comment: "College is not just about money." And my answer: "So don't let your kids go into $ 100,000 in debt just so they can read books for a few years. ".)

I wanted to find someone who was not an entrepreneur in the traditional sense or an employee somewhere.

I kept seeing this guy Steve Scott on Amazon. His books continued to outperform my books on Amazon's charts. How could "23 anti-procrastination habits" rank higher than "choose yourself"?

Other books would be: "70 healthy habits" or "How to start a successful blog in an hour".

And every few weeks there would be another book. I first noticed it under Steve Scott. But then with a completely different picture, I noticed the same style of books under SJ Scott.

It was like a book machine. ".99 is the new free", "Sort your inbox", and so on.

So I called him. I did not know him. He had no friends who knew him. I think he lives in the middle of Ohio.

I wanted to know what the hell he was doing. I wanted my kids to do it so they would never have the worries and anxieties that I had in my 20s and 30s.

He entered my podcast "The James Altucher Show" (I'm not trying to get you to listen to him. I'm going to tell you everything he said here).

He told me just two years ago that he was completely broke and that he was trying to figure out what to do. He basically had zero in the bank and was not making any money.

"Last month I made more than $ 40,000," he told me. He has written 42 books in the last two years. Now write a book every three weeks.

"Can someone do this?" Asked.

And he said "yes" and we did a podcast with him because he wanted everyone to hear his detailed answers. You can listen for free on iTunes or Stitcher (for Android phones).

He basically writes 2000 words a day. On the cover of each book you have several things that you give away for free if people subscribe to your email list.

"Take a concept that interests you," he said, "divide it into many parts and write a book about each part.

"For example, if you are interested in golf, write a book on how to get the right equipment, write a book on how to improve your swing in 10 easy steps, write a book," Learn to put 100% better in sixty minutes, " and so on.

Each book gets you more email subscribers. More email subscribers give you more book sales. And so on.

Did you study writing or marketing in college? You decide: he majored in criminal psychology at Montclair State University.

It took him two years to build, but now he's a marketing and entrepreneurial machine even though he's never done anything like this before.

He has no boss. Enjoy your free time. Earn more money than 95% of CEOs in the corporate world. If I graduated with my CS degree, this is what I would do now instead of what I did.

I asked him why he was being so transparent. Why was he telling me EVERYTHING. "Can't anyone just copy what you do?"

"Sure," he says. "But I work very hard."

Every story for a 250k salary (or income) is different. Mine took me 8 years and I didn't even have a degree in computer science. What I did have is a passion for technology, social skills, and a never-ending desire to learn and teach what I know.

2005 - ($ 40k)
- Graduated with a Bachelor of Design from Tech School and 20k student loan debt.
- I started working on the first design job in New York in a small company of 10 people for $ 40 thousand a year.
- I quickly run out of design projects and start doing simple web coding for them in HTML / CSS.

2006 - ($ 50k)
- Annual increase of $ 10k. Company requests get more complex and I'm

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Every story for a 250k salary (or income) is different. Mine took me 8 years and I didn't even have a degree in computer science. What I did have is a passion for technology, social skills, and a never-ending desire to learn and teach what I know.

2005 - ($ 40k)
- Graduated with a Bachelor of Design from Tech School and 20k student loan debt.
- I started working on the first design job in New York in a small company of 10 people for $ 40 thousand a year.
- I quickly run out of design projects and start doing simple web coding for them in HTML / CSS.

2006 - ($ 50k)
- Annual increase of $ 10k. The company requests get more complex and now I am doing PHP / Postgres.

2007 - ($ 75k)
- $ 10k annual increase following the company's current battles with the social media company. The result is my new salary of $ 75k at the social media company.
- The new job accelerates my learning on the web.

2008 - ($ 85k)
- Annual bonus of $ 10k. Over time, move to the main front.

2009 - ($ 95k)
- Annual bonus of $ 10k. You start to get bored with your current job. I really want to move the company forward, but the company is run by finance people, not technology people. I start freelancing at $ 40 / hour on fun little projects to keep my brain active.

2010 - ($ 120k)
- I leave the social media company after 3 years as they are stuck in tech and not accepting of my ideas. Disney likes my tech ideas and hires me for 120k porting iPhone and Android games to HTML5. I'm moving to the West Coast.
- I quit my job at 7 months. Disney is an amazing company but full of comfortable people who don't push envelopes and are ready for 2.5 kids and a house. No risk means no more rewards than a room full of sweets and ready meals.
- Start my own startup (LLC) that runs out of funds (my own money) in a few months. Decide that this is slightly better than having an actual boss and turning a startup into a consultancy helping companies advance their technology - usually helping them move from Flash to HTML5.
- This is the year of hustle and bustle. I give a lot of (unpaid) talks at various tech conferences on topics like Backbone.js and Responsive Design. I am invited to be a technology editor on some Packt Publishing books, where I get a paragraph dedicated to me and my consulting. In time, continue to edit O'Reilly's books.
- I help many startups, generally for free and I tell them if they have a problem that takes more than an hour to solve, after they call me.
- I am so busy that I hired two full time contractors to work for me.

2011 - (165k)
- Consulting work continues. I usually spend 3 months with each startup. The largest client is Skype, where we work on internal pilot projects. I raise my rates between clients and eventually start charging $ 140 / hr.

2012 - (250k)
- All clients want to hire me full time. This is not something I want or need as I am earning enough with a lot of work in the queue. A small client is fully financed through one of our prototypes that we help them build. He offers a salary of $ 250,000 to lead the entire development team and scale on Amazon Cloud. This increases my interest, as they know that I am not qualified for this, but they trust that I can learn. I get to 1) I get paid a high salary without rushing through work 2) I get paid to learn to scale on Amazon Cloud 3) I get paid to learn valuable skills in operating a development team.

My main tips are:
- Never stop rushing.
- Never stop learning. Have a growth mindset (Science: the growth mindset). No matter how much smarter those around you are, if you understand that intelligence can be developed, nothing can stop you.
- Don't get too comfortable with small successes.
- Network and help everyone. Not only is this a great thing to do, but some of these people may go even further than you want and need your help, as you may need theirs when you're at the top.
- Never stay in the same job for more than 2-3 years (or when you feel like you have nothing else to learn, whichever comes first).
- Never take a job just for the money. It's the best way to hit a career dead end or lose valuable time.
- When you have at least two big names on your resume, people automatically trust you a lot more. You've been around the block. Between those two big names, take risks, work at smaller companies, or try starting your own. It may or may not work in your favor. In technology, failure is a badge you wear. It means you tried.
- Linked recommendations. They're so dumb to ask, but man, when you have like a dozen AND you have 2 big names on your resume, you just go unstoppable. If it's really good to work with you, all of these actual recommendations will have similar themes about who you are and what it's like to work with you.
- Take calculated risk. I turned down developer jobs at every company, from Amazon to Skype to Microsoft, to get where I am today. (These guys weren't even talking to me in the first few days before I was successful.) Every path I didn't take was a huge risk of losing my job or having to start over at a new job, but (thankfully) all the greats the jump was successful.
- I often tell my dreaming friends not to look at the stars to tell you where to go, but to look at them to draw a map of where you are and where you want to go. Check it regularly to correct your ship as it deviates from the course of its intended target. (I'm sure I can make this sound more poetic if I try, but you get my point. Dream less and do more.)
- And finally, a numerical goal like $ 250k is great, but recognize that it is not the end and it will be everything. Like a marathon, it's not really about completing a marathon, but about how your body and mind will be when you get there. In the end, who cares about the real marathon?

This is a first draft. I'm sure I'll refine if I can as an anonymous user.

Update 8/14/2015: I added more content. More to come!

*** NOTE, all of the above is essentially the answer. Everything else below is just me challenging myself to do more and the thoughts and learnings around it. ***

Update 10/23/2015 Edited 4/8/2016: This post blew up more than expected and I have received many great comments and questions. The one that intrigued me the most was "How do you get to the next step of a million?" To be honest, I was pretty stunned by an answer because just hitting 250k seemed comfortable: 4 years making that kind of salary and you've already hit a million dollars.

But I'm not one to rest on my laurels for long. I previously said that I never had a goal of making a million, but I thought about it more seriously: I wanted to make a million before I turned 30. I am currently 33 years old and I remember the day I turned 30. I had a loss. I thought "well, I didn't make it, but I didn't do that badly." In fact, the day I accepted the 250k salary offer a year or two before I turned 30, I knew I would not make it and I was okay with that. Similarly, I had a goal of running a marathon, went from the couch to months of training, and successfully completed 2 half marathons (best time: 2:01). I found my knees just not working well after 10 miles and so I gave it up on my marathon goal. On the one hand, I am a complete failure for not meeting my million dollar goal or my marathon goal, on the other hand, it is those goals that led me to reach the smallest milestones. I find this to be a recurring theme in my life.

As I wrote earlier in my update, following my advice above, I have decided to renew my million dollar goal and I think I can do it. I did a lot of research and 11 books later (on finance, real estate, startups, etc.), I have a game plan. Whether this game plan is good or bad is yet to be determined, but if it works, I will freely post how I did it step by step. Either way, it should be an entertaining story. I will update this post every six months from my original post to provide feedback on how to reach a net worth of one million. See you again on February 7, 2016.

Update 8/4/2016: I am two months behind on the update, but thanks to the encouragement of a commenter, I am back! For the sake of brevity, I'll start with a list of items from the culmination of my research so far and a list of items from updates from my life, my first failure in that goal, and thoughts about it.

Defining the goal first:
Before we start, we need to define the goal. It is not plausible to go from zero (or 250k / yr) to a million YEAR to begin with. So my goal is to have "a million in the bank." By bank, I really mean liquid assets. My longer term goal is to be able to earn 20% interest on that million dollars every year = $ 200k / year is passive income. This is not entirely unrealistic, as research shows that the current average annual return from 1926 (the year the S&P started) through 2011 is + 12%. If you could have a million in the right index / diverse mutual funds or the right real estate markets, you can.

Research Findings:
- The two most important ways to aim higher for me are investing in the housing market with my existing funds (aka rental properties, while keeping my job) or starting my own business and reaching the right space at the right time. .

Attempt 1: Investing in property
- I decided to stick with the previous idea
- A little over a year ago I moved from my small cramped studio in the city to the suburbs. I bought a newer construction home for $ 575k and today it is worth almost $ 700k. That's $ 125k (+ 21%) increased in value for just living there for just over a year.
- The two most surprising benefits of buying a home are: 1) You only need a 20% down payment to buy a home, yet all the appreciation you get from the value of your home is 100% yours. 2) You get a mortgage interest deduction on your home loan. I received a staggering $ 20k tax refund the year after I bought my home. It is the largest tax benefit the IRS offers.
- The problem is that I was lucky: the housing market is very hot where I am. I could buy additional houses, but they would be very expensive, I doubt that the properties near me will increase again by 20% per year.
- There are still ways to make money here by buying more out of town and making money by renting for more than your mortgage (very easy to do a year ago when values ​​were lower) and then selling in a few years, but you are not exempt from risks and it's a lot of long-term setup and tenant management. After buying the house a year ago, I managed to save $ 60k right now, but I need at least $ 100k to buy something decent.
- Final conclusions: if you have about $ 100k to invest, the real estate market is a good decision. As Mark Twain said: "Buy land, they don't make it anymore." The problem is that I currently don't have enough. (However, if you don't currently own your home, I think this is a great first goal to save for.) I read a LOT of books on real estate investing and the best was: The Wall Street Journal: Complete Real-Estate Investing Guide.

Attempt 2: Starting a new company at the right time (ongoing)
- I had to quit my job. The problem is outside the stock of the company (usually with a 4 year award cliff), realistically you will not earn more than a 250k salary. Those stock options can bring you millions in a few years in the right situation, but it's really a gamble. On top of that, you will be working 40 hours a week for someone else, limiting your time and energy to earn more money elsewhere.

My startup that paid me my big salary was acquired almost 6 months ago by a larger company. Unfortunately, it wasn't for long. It made our shares worthless, but on the other hand, this larger, more stable company offered me my same salary. Basically, it's a dead-end job that lasts a lifetime and pays well, but with no room for promotion and in a very outdated corporate environment.

In those 6 months at Big Co I reflected a lot on my next steps. I thought about my failures trying to start my first company on my own and how thankfully I got things right with the wave of HTML5 technology that I surfed to start my successful consulting. It's all a matter of time, not just hard work. People always say "oh, he or she was LUCKY", but there are things you can do to get more luck. Then a few months ago, a new technology made its way to the web browser and reached full compatibility across all devices, mobile and desktop. I put a months notice and my last day is next Friday. I am going to start my second company. I will take my savings of $ 60k originally saved to purchase a rental property to kick off my next startup for the next 6 months, and this time I will bring in co-founders. We'll either strive to be profitable after 6 months or raise money with a finished prototype so we can grow. See you on August 7, 2016 for updates.

Wealth is relative. Keep it in mind. Your quality of life, including the size of your home and the things you can afford, will probably be better if you make 100,000 in the suburbs than 250,000 in New York City. So keep that in mind.

But if your goal is just the number (which I urge you to reconsider), then you would follow a plan like this:

  1. Be a thought leader. Absolutely own your tech stack. Build new things. Get projects up and running on github. Lead projects at work. Do whatever it takes to improve.
  2. Take the time. Experience is about putting in hours. They say you need 10,000 hou
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Wealth is relative. Keep it in mind. Your quality of life, including the size of your home and the things you can afford, will probably be better if you make 100,000 in the suburbs than 250,000 in New York City. So keep that in mind.

But if your goal is just the number (which I urge you to reconsider), then you would follow a plan like this:

  1. Be a thought leader. Absolutely own your tech stack. Build new things. Get projects up and running on github. Lead projects at work. Do whatever it takes to improve.
  2. Take the time. Experience is about putting in hours. They say it takes 10,000 hours on average to be an expert at something. Better start!
  3. It changes a lot of work. Study after study shows you make more money if you change jobs. Your increase when changing jobs almost always exceeds the standard year-end increase that your current employer will give you. Stay in a job for a year or two, milk all it's worth (from a learning perspective; I'm not suggesting they rob the place), and then switch. But never stop looking. Don't take a job, have a plan to stay for a certain period of time, and then start looking. No. Start searching immediately after being hired. Opportunities do not appear in a cycle. If you are a teacher, you will likely be hired for a full-time job that begins in the fall. Software jobs don't work that way. A little aside: when looking for new opportunities,
  4. Plan to go from developer to team leader, from architect to manager and ... You won't easily reach 250K / yr by staying as a software developer. To earn that amount of money, you have to move up in an organization and take on more responsibilities. Basically, you have to follow steps 1 and 2 and apply them not only to technology, but also to business. Stay up-to-date with management styles (scrum, agile, lean, etc.) and make sure you not only know it, but can practice it.


Now that I have said that, this is what I would really suggest.

Setting lofty goals like this sounds like you're making up for something. Ok, I'm kidding. But it's similar to what you would say if you saw a 40-year-old guy in a flashy red sports car with the top down, his arm out the window, and trying to pick up girls on the Las Vegas Strip. Be serious. Better to imagine what quality of life you want and set your goals based on that. What does 250K really offer you? Why did you choose that number? What does it have to do with anything?

This is my story. At 16 I started as a software developer. During the "dot-com" boom of the late 1990s, I was building custom ecommerce sites for some really big customers. I was also building custom web-based software and doing what was, at the time, cutting edge JavaScript stuff (this basically predates any front-end library). As a result, I thought he was the most amazing person of all time. So I set myself some of the most amazing goals ever. My goal when I went to college was probably to be there for a year or two, enjoy my free time, make new contacts, and probably to be begged me to drop out of college and go to work full time from the first internship I got. I told myself that I would not accept anything under 100K. Why 100K? Because it sounded great. How naive I was in hindsight.

Truth: None of that happened. While I can say that the three companies I worked for NEVER took another intern after me, they all cited that I set the bar too high and realized what an intern could do, that was amazing to my ego, the The reality is, most companies weren't drooling over me to the point of suggesting that I drop out of college to work for them. It just didn't happen.

So after college, I decided to reconsider my priorities. I started consulting 6 months after college. I had built a good network in college, as planned, but I used them as stepping stones to ensure the quality of life I wanted. It has been 8 years since I graduated from university and I never had to look for work. I work from home. I eat three meals a day with my wife and two children. I have spent more than 16 months in Barcelona, ​​Spain for the last 8 years; just last year, together with me, we were three months in a row. I worked remotely. We plan to return next fall and stay a full year so our children can go to school there.

Do I earn 250K / year? After taxes, not even close! I keep my fees low relative to market norms to make sure my clients don't have to question whether or not they can keep me. I live in the suburbs, I have no debt, I have never lived on a budget, I make my own hours, I take time off when I need it, and I make sure I enjoy life.

Tell me, does it sound like I'm missing something in life because I don't earn 250K?

There are two reliable ways to get to that level. One is boring and the other is difficult, but both have a high chance of success in taking you to the $ 250k level in your 30s. Both will require a lot of attention and you will be tempted by more attractive offers like startup positions. Don't let this happen if your goal is only to hit the $ 250k level.

  1. The hard way: Get really good at C ++ and focus on low latency concerns like cache performance and code optimization. After a few years, you will be able to earn a lot of money writing trading algorithms. You will not be working on the ma
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There are two reliable ways to get to that level. One is boring and the other is difficult, but both have a high chance of success in taking you to the $ 250k level in your 30s. Both will require a lot of attention and you will be tempted by more attractive offers like startup positions. Don't let this happen if your goal is only to hit the $ 250k level.

  1. The hard way: Get really good at C ++ and focus on low latency concerns like cache performance and code optimization. After a few years, you will be able to earn a lot of money writing trading algorithms. You won't work on the macroscopically appealing problems (distributed systems, functional programming languages, machine learning), but low-latency trading has its own challenges. Some people really enjoy it. Others hate it. However, it is worth a try. If you excel at this, you could be in the $ 500,000 / year range at 30 years, and $ 1 million + is possible with a lot of luck. However, you will have some job volatility. Your employer could disappear after a bad exchange, Or you could be fired for strange political reasons that have nothing to do with you. However, you will win in the long run.
  2. The boring way: Join a big software company like Google or Microsoft right out of school. Don't make enemies and take no chances. Be reliable and develop (for years) the advantage of institutional knowledge: you know how things are done At <Company>. Focus on getting more visible projects rather than playing the promotion game or landing an interesting job. If you choose the right projects, promotions are natural. Since you are young, you have a little more mobility than you would at an older age, because you are more likely to get the benefit of the doubt if you have a mediocre political success review (uh, I mean "performance" review) track record and want to switch to a better project. After 8 years of polishing, it should have a title like "

I think the most reliable way would be to hire. You can charge as much or as little as you want, but then you go off and do the work and no one can guess how much time you actually put in, so while you're delivering value, you get paid and you can take more work. . That's all you have to do. I'm 100% sure I could make this amount of money right now by using a little filler, and a lot of talent and hard work, because I know that a programmer will normally only work half their time, or hesitate on a problem worthless for half the time. Either way, I

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I think the most reliable way would be to hire. You can charge as much or as little as you want, but then you go off and do the work and no one can guess how much time you actually put in, so while you're delivering value, you get paid and you can take more work. . That's all you have to do. I'm 100% sure I could make this amount of money right now by using a little filler, and a lot of talent and hard work, because I know that a programmer will normally only work half their time, or hesitate on a problem worthless for half the time. Either way, there are plenty of money-making opportunities if you are the type of person who truly delivers, reliably.

Many guys discover hiring and learn how to reduce their working hours and still live at a level that they are comfortable with. One thing I learned about myself is that I slow down once I reach a certain income level. That happened to me somewhere in the $ 120k range (in cheap Rocky Mountain suburbs). I have everything I need and mainly I don't want to work so much. Once you realize how much stress those guys at the top had to endure to get to where they are, you can reconsider. That stress will change you.

Suppose you are able to earn $ 250,000 a year working for someone else, then it is very likely that you have the talent to go much higher. Think about it, if it's you, then I think you should start planning how the world is going to change for the better, that's a much more interesting goal, money will spill over you along the way. There is no better time for a risky adventure than when you are young. However, you can't just program your path to success, I think you will find that the entrepreneur is really the most talented of all people, programmers have just learned a trick that keeps them fat and happy. $ 250k is a range in which, if you make it, you are probably more in the group of entrepreneurs,

My best advice: I have found that due to the political nature of companies (everyone around you is trying to achieve the same thing as you), reliability will be the hardest part to pin down. It may or may not be easy for you, the reason can range from "my boss's best friend since childhood was my co-worker and I had no idea all this time" to "this is a racist company with a racist culture" or Whatever it is, it could be anything. The way to mitigate this risk is to change jobs if things obviously don't go well for you in, say, 18 months. Just quitting your job sometimes stimulates growth activity (counter offers, people approaching you, etc.). Usually, especially in the beginning, this will lead to a raise or promotion of some kind.

Lastly, I wouldn't listen to people saying "Google or Microsoft" because those jobs are extremely competitive and they only do good first jobs for name recognition, the pay is notoriously bad. If you haven't secured a path to victory at one of those great companies a year from now, I'd figure out how to leave at the right time (maybe to try a new company).

My answer to this question first would be
1. Question your maturity, I don't mean to say this is demeaning, but I'm pretty sure you have in mind that $ 250,000 is a magic number that you'll be perfectly happy with. By that I mean that you think all your monetary / fiscal problems will go away ... Just a guess?
2. THE GOOD - Although I got a master's degree in Computer Science, I think my experience would be the same for your question. I own a consulting business that bills between $ 80 and $ 350 an hour, depending on the work involved. The upper end of our scale almost always

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My answer to this question first would be
1. Question your maturity, I don't mean to say this is demeaning, but I'm pretty sure you have in mind that $ 250,000 is a magic number that you'll be perfectly happy with. By that I mean that you think all your monetary / fiscal problems will go away ... Just a guess?
2. THE GOOD - Although I got a master's degree in Computer Science, I think my experience would be the same for your question. I own a consulting business that bills between $ 80 and $ 350 an hour, depending on the work involved. The upper end of our scale almost always involves design architecture of some kind. Obviously, $ 350 an hour and working more than 40 hours a week is MUCH more than $ 250,000 a year. We do not do any of the work mentioned above, and most of our work is done on legacy systems, typically Microsoft or Java based accounting systems. We are also not as expensive as the others. However, we are extremely good, fast and most of all, RELIABLE. That has been the key to our success.
3. The BAD - Have I had the CEO of a company calling from his jet about to land and wondering why his accounting firm (which he also owns by the way) has several hundred thousand dollars off numbers in real time? Yes. I was shitting the proverbial brick ... Yes. Did I find out quickly? Yes. Did you tell me later that NO ONE would touch your systems except MY company? If he did! He was proud, of course he was. Ok, now the reality, with me and another consultant, we had made approximately $ 20,000 in three and a half days. THAT'S GREAT BUT AND HERE'S MY TIP -> keep reading
4. I love what I do, I mean I LOVE IT, and by that I mean programming, I love machine learning, functional languages, artificial intelligence, architecture, discrete mathematics, statistics, topology, even debugging: P If I were you, I would Expect the money, yes, keep your eyes open for opportunities, but focus on what you want to do, rather than what you earn. The money in this field is fantastic, although some of the work is brain drain ............... My friend is a CCIE, Cisco engineer, he makes a lot of money $ 200K + I think, but I know what it does and it would blow my brains out in a month if it had to do its job, router tables and system pulse check are NOT my cup of tea.

I hope you take it as intended, and I hope you get it right ")

There are two main paths to follow:

1) Employment (work for men)

A) Be bright

For this to work, you need to be smart, talented, and motivated. You have to be the best.

Use your skills to become the expert within the organization / industry. Show managers and team members the importance of your skills and knowledge.

From the beginning, talk to people who know the industry and know current / future leaders. Find out everything you need to know about getting promoted.

Get a mentor. If you are young and ambitious enough, don't be afraid to ask the 'guru' for guidance.

Discover niche skills and

Keep reading

There are two main paths to follow:

1) Employment (work for men)

A) Be bright

For this to work, you need to be smart, talented, and motivated. You have to be the best.

Use your skills to become the expert within the organization / industry. Show managers and team members the importance of your skills and knowledge.

From the beginning, talk to people who know the industry and know current / future leaders. Find out everything you need to know about getting promoted.

Get a mentor. If you are young and ambitious enough, don't be afraid to ask the 'guru' for guidance.

Find out about niche skills and how you can differentiate yourself from others. Over time, you may be forced to take a risk and pursue a particular skill set that doesn't pay off.

You will need confidence to convince others of your strengths, good interpersonal skills, ability to build strong networks, and perseverance.

You will have to "play the game", which may involve being part of your superiors and being a team player.

Be the best friend of your boss's 'bosses' and always be on the lookout for new opportunities (internal / external). Balance loyalty points with financial rewards.

Crystal ball:

  • Before graduating, you are brilliant and have a reputation. People want to hire you before graduation (but you may need to prove yourself). $ 50-100k per year.
  • You start out as a Junior, but quickly prove that you are valuable and indispensable. You are offered a promotion, pay raise plus bonus. $ 100k-150k per year.
  • Within the first 1-3 years, you are in a manager who pays quite a bit of money to create your own toys and manage a team. $ 150k-200 per year.
  • In year 4-7, his break from the middle manager position begins to bump into the big boys. $ 200k + per year.
  • Year 8 has a difficult choice between starting their own business with their mentor; or take advantage of various angel investment opportunities while remaining a consultant to the company that hired you as a graduate. She is a columnist for her industry magazine that is read by government leaders. $ 250k + per year, but it's not about the money anymore.

B) Cheating

If you don't have the above, you must go a less honorable route. This will involve deception and manipulation. Self-preservation is your number one goal.

Steal and cheat to get the promotions you want and outshine others. Get down long enough to get into a position where your knowledge is not important. Rather, get smart people (A) to do the work for you.

Think American Psycho.

Crystal ball:

  • Before graduating, you have a reputation (but for the wrong reasons). People want to hire you before graduation (but you may need to prove yourself). $ 50-100k per year.
  • You start out as a junior, but your manager realizes that you are not as valuable as your CV said. You have become expendable. Fortunately you have dirt on your boss and since he can't fire you, he gets you promoted. You are offered a promotion, pay raise plus bonus. $ 100k-150k per year.
  • Within the first 1-3 years, you are in a manager paying decent dollars for others to create your toys and manipulate a team. Or you are eventually fired and forced to sneak into another job. You have improved playing with the system. $ 150k-200 per year.
  • In year 4-7, his break from the middle manager position begins to bump into the big boys. This is because you have entered the inner circle through deception and lies. $ 200k + per year.
  • Year 8 has a difficult choice between continuing the charade or pretending to start her own business with her mentor. $ 250k + per year, but now it's all about the money.

2) Self-employment (be the boss)

This route may well follow after you have passed 1. The control, satisfaction, and opportunity that self-employment can bring is enormous. It takes hard work and risks, but it can be done with the right mindset.

Consulting seems logical. However, consider how you might apply your transferable skills to a new business venture.

Crystal ball:

  • Spend 1 to 7 years as an employee, learning the industry and developing your knowledge. You strengthen your skills through side projects, networking, and general curiosity. $ 20-100k per year (plus $ 10k + per year from side projects)
  • At the beginning of year 7, you are planning your exit, which will take approximately 2 years to run (end of year 8). You and a close colleague quit and start building your new business. It takes a massive loan and many hours. However, you are now making $ 250k per year running a successful company ...

I can think of two paths that will get you to $ 250,000 (even adjusting for inflation) in eight years:

1: Statistical analysis and predictive modeling (also known as predictive analytics).

Learn SPSS, R, and SAS. Get familiar with big data tools. Learn to analyze large structured and unstructured data sets to find patterns. Get experience (work) in at least one or two industries so you understand those companies and what kind of information is important to them. Insurance, healthcare, and finance (specifically loans) are good industries to know about as a predictive modeling specialist.

Put

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I can think of two paths that will get you to $ 250,000 (even adjusting for inflation) in eight years:

1: Statistical analysis and predictive modeling (also known as predictive analytics).

Learn SPSS, R, and SAS. Get familiar with big data tools. Learn to analyze large structured and unstructured data sets to find patterns. Get experience (work) in at least one or two industries so you understand those companies and what kind of information is important to them. Insurance, healthcare, and finance (specifically loans) are good industries to know about as a predictive modeling specialist.

Spend your time as an employee in a place that allows you to learn as much as you can. Get exposure to as many tools and technologies as possible. Establish yourself as an expert in the field. Be the "nuts and bolts" person everyone turns to when they need to dig into the data for answers. Get noticed by underwriters, actuaries, credit and claims managers, marketers, and take on the tough jobs. Whatever you do, stay in touch with key players and managers when you change companies (and you should change companies *) to create contacts.

Once you've done this for 6-7 years, you can act on your own as a consultant or contractor (there is / may be a difference, but that's another discussion). If you had started doing this 7 years ago, you could easily charge $ 150 an hour (or A LOT more, I know someone who charges his clients at least $ 300 an hour) for his services. Even in a full-time job, someone with this background could make $ 200,000 a year (or more) on base salary alone.

2: Specialist in Financial Analysis and Planning (FP&A).

Master one of the tools companies use to automate their financial planning and budgeting. One of the most powerful and ubiquitous is IBM's Cognos TM1. Learn how to install, configure, and customize TM1. Learn to design and model TM1 solutions - the real money is in design and development, not management. Learn about ETL (IT processes), rules, feeders, check jumps. Also learn Cognos BI: You must understand dimensional modeling and be able to create complex dashboards and reports, and understand how the various tools in the Cognos suite interact with each other. Become a data expert. Get really good at SQL.

The key is that while doing all of this (and yes, it is a lot to learn, but you want to make a lot of money) you must acquire a significant amount of knowledge about how the financial and accounting functions work within various companies. Being a TM1 expert will make you valuable and you will learn a lot about finance along the way, but you have to really understand this business function. That is what will make you really valuable.

Again, you must cultivate contacts and establish a "fan base" of satisfied managers, end-users, customers, and colleagues along the way. Do this for 6 or 7 years and then do it on your own. If you had started this 7 years ago, you could easily be charging $ 130-170 for your services right now. **

None of these areas show any signs of slowing down, certainly not over the next decade. If there is a new tool or technology that suddenly wins a large share of the market, you will have the basic skills and learning a new tool should be easy for you.

* One way to do this without having to change companies is to work for a consulting firm, such as one of the Big 4, IBM, or a boutique consulting firm. In fact, this will give you the opportunity to work with many companies and make many contacts without frequent job changes. You can also enhance the resume, as if you plan to specialize in SPSS or TM1, which are IBM products, having more than 5 years at IBM would really enhance its value.

** The amount a consultant or contractor can charge will vary widely depending on many factors, including geography, length of engagement, level of proficiency with particular technologies, knowledge of the industry, and whether they find their own jobs or work with a broker or recruiter.

Finance and capital markets can get you there.

The total compensation of 250K is like a base of 200K plus a 25% bonus. Bloomberg in New York pays programmers so much, some hedge funds in New York also pay so much, so it's totally doable.

On a contract basis, 250K / year is $ 125 / hour or a daily rate of $ 1,000. Some investment banks in New York pay that to hire programmers. It is at the top of the range, but it is within the range. These contracts exist.

However, here is the catch. It is not enough to be a "CS graduate", it is not even enough to be a "stellar programmer" to get that rate. You need to have knowledge and

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Finance and capital markets can get you there.

The total compensation of 250K is like a base of 200K plus a 25% bonus. Bloomberg in New York pays programmers so much, some hedge funds in New York also pay so much, so it's totally doable.

On a contract basis, 250K / year is $ 125 / hour or a daily rate of $ 1,000. Some investment banks in New York pay that to hire programmers. It is at the top of the range, but it is within the range. These contracts exist.

However, here is the catch. It is not enough to be a "CS graduate", it is not even enough to be a "stellar programmer" to get that rate. It is necessary to have knowledge and experience in capital markets.

Here are some practical steps you can take.

# 1. Consider staying in school for a couple more years to get an MBA in finance or a Master's in Financial Engineering. After that, it will take 6 years to reach 250K, still doable.

# 2. Consider moving to New York immediately after graduation. You can gain practical knowledge of financial markets by doing projects. At first, don't worry too much about your current salary. Worry about getting your feet wet with real financial staff. Stay away from HR apps, customer relationship management (CRM) apps, and regulatory reporting app; they do not count as essential financial experience, even if done for an investment bank. Try to get real experience in business applications, risk management, hedging, etc., these are the areas that will get you 250 or more.

# 3. Once at work in New York City, consider signing up for the CFA designation. As a programmer, you don't really need to finish it, just a simple “CFA Level II Candidate” banner on your resume can go a long way for some hedge funds.

Also, you asked "what is the way a CS graduate can earn 250K", but CS graduate doesn't necessarily mean you work as a computer programmer. When you're in New York, when you're on a trading floor at some investment bank, look for ways to go from being a programmer to being an assistant trader and then a trader. As a dealer, you will see 250K in a rear view mirror.

Good luck.

Much depends on the job market in which you intend to work. You won't get $ 250k in Armpit, North Dakota. But in the Bay Area, Seattle, New York, it is certainly doable.

Assuming the market will support it:

$ 250K is possible as an employee as an individual contributor (developer, engineer, designer, architect) in some companies and markets, but with competition from smart and offshore start-ups, those positions are getting fewer and more. In between. You really need to be at the top of your field to get these jobs and keep them. The competition is fierce and you must be something

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Much depends on the job market in which you intend to work. You won't get $ 250k in Armpit, North Dakota. But in the Bay Area, Seattle, New York, it is certainly doable.

Assuming the market will support it:

$ 250K is possible as an employee as an individual contributor (developer, engineer, designer, architect) in some companies and markets, but with competition from offshore companies and smart upstarts, those positions are becoming scarcer. You really need to be at the top of your field to get these jobs and keep them. The competition is fierce and you need to be something special to guarantee that money. $ 100-160K is more common. You * will * compete * with people who have the same BSc as you and an MBA / MSc, experience and proven results. The worst of all is that one of them will be willing to cut your salary.

$ 250K as an employee will generally mean that you are:
-in a startup. It is likely that part of that compensation is in equity: in
a mid-to-senior management
role -In a commission-based role like sales or account management
In these situations, your bachelor's degree is just a ticket in the door. You'll need to demonstrate business skills, leadership, and drive to leverage that into something else. Getting into that $ 250K range is easier with an MBA than a BSc, but it is possible.

$ 250K as an hourly consultant doing the same job as above is not that difficult. It costs $ 120 / hour to 40 hours a week, and that's not at all unreasonable for a medium to high-end resource. Unfortunately, that fee is total and you will have to manage your own benefits, training, vacations, etc. On the bright side, if you work 40+ hours and get paid for it, that starts to add up very quickly. . If you want to do consulting, but need "employee expertise," the consulting firm you work for will get a cut. You can make half a million a year with a reputable firm, but you won't see even close to that on your paycheck.

$ 250,000 as an entrepreneur is probably the most reliable path. Take a job with a consulting firm or development house for a couple of years to learn how to drive with someone else's money and PAY ATTENTION! Find out how they run their business, build your own personal network, learn from their mistakes (and your own). Then when you're ready, take advantage of that experience and be independent. If you are moderately good at what you do, you will find yourself with more work than you can do yourself. Outsource to one of your network and take a share of the billing. Repeat and the next you know, you will be running your own consulting business. Be generous with money, pay for skills you don't have, and treat your employees / partners / subcontractors and customers with respect.

I would also like to point out that money is good, but quality of life should also be a consideration. Make sure you don't back into a corner where you are making a lot of money doing something you hate. It is very difficult to walk away once you get used to a certain cash flow. It's much easier to adjust course early and try to align your passion with your potential income.

Good luck!

Be cool at school. Create non-trivial software there - take project classes like building compilers, which involves building one. Take real-world projects to overcome your first mistakes - free software (I liked Linux and built the first SCSI subsystem that sucked) is great. Get a couple of years of experience before you graduate.

Go to a startup where you can do things that would be beyond your salary level in a large company where there is less interesting work than older people, you have the freedom to try different processes and things like automation and testing does not They are from someone else.

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Be cool at school. Create non-trivial software there - take project classes like building compilers, which involves building one. Take real-world projects to overcome your first mistakes - free software (I liked Linux and built the first SCSI subsystem that sucked) is great. Get a couple of years of experience before you graduate.

Head for a startup where you can do things which would be beyond your pay grade at a big company where there's less interesting work than senior people, you have latitude to try different processes, and things like automation and test are not some one else's job.

Do that again a few times - startup leadership roles are often available to those who demonstrate motivation and aptitude for it.

Take those credentials to a big company which has vaults of cash but problems hiring senior people because opportunities for new development are limited, there's lots of overhead, and advancement takes a lot of political maneuvering.

You could also use that experience for consulting ($250K is just $133/hour with 40 hour work weeks, 10 holidays, and 3 weeks of vacation) although that limits project scope. Telling people making cable boxes they're not gaining anything by writing STL replacements can pay well but isn't much fun.

Before that you might realize a single person with somewhat modest aspirations in housing (smaller home and something like a townhouse in more expensive places because 1-2 people and a pet or two don't need much) and vehicles (a motorcycle and 3-year old off-lease German sports sedan is OK) doesn't need that much in spite of eating most meals out, foreign travel, expensive hobbies like flying planes and skydiving, etc. (this is after meeting your basic needs like retirement which implies putting the legal maximum in tax advantaged retirement accounts) and decide you're better off making a smaller multiple of the median household income working at more interesting jobs.

You'll also need to live some place where software contributes to companies' bottom lines instead of being a cost center, although such places (like the San Francisco Bay Area) are expensive (as of Q1 2016 the median home sale price was $2.2 million in Palo Alto) so the money won't go as far as you think.

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