What is the most memorable moment of your job that you retired from?

Updated on : December 4, 2021 by Paige Cooke



What is the most memorable moment of your job that you retired from?

I can't really say that I didn't retire from any job as I got injured when I was actually in between jobs.

I have many memories of working at FMC (Food Machinery Co). When they announced that they were going to close the plant and move it to Florida. We used to go to a little bar on Thursdays for lunch, there was a hole in the fence that we used to go through.

After returning from lunch we (my helper and I) would go inside the MDL (Main Deck Loader) behind the wheels as we could not be seen and we would play point to point until we felt we could work safely, since my work was proof of product and final in

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I can't really say that I didn't retire from any job as I got injured when I was actually in between jobs.

I have many memories of working at FMC (Food Machinery Co). When they announced that they were going to close the plant and move it to Florida. We used to go to a little bar on Thursdays for lunch, there was a hole in the fence that we used to go through.

After returning from lunch we (my helper and I) would go inside the MDL (Main Deck Loader) behind the wheels as we could not be seen and we would play point by point until we felt we could work safely, since my job was product testing and final inspection.

Below is a CDM that is used to load containers on airplanes.

Realizing that I may never work again while lying on a specialized electric bed that inflated and deflated at a rhythmic rate. However, it prevented me from sleeping until I was completely exhausted from the inflation and deflation of the specialized mattress. This continued for the remaining six days in a stroke unit. My medical team ran many tests and concluded that I am unable to work due to loss of vision, loss of short and long term memory, loss of skills that I had and no longer working productively.

Memories of work? They are scrambled and scrambled similar to scrambled eggs.

There were so many memorable moments during my 37 years as a ship's communications officer.

  1. participated in the communications liaison with NASA for the maiden voyage of the space shuttle.
  2. It circumnavigated the globe and transited the Panama Canal several times.
  3. Diving wrecks, caves, blue walls, lava tubes, jellyfish lakes in Micronesia, the Red Sea, the Mediterranean, Hawaii, the Channel Islands and the Florida Keys
  4. toured Egypt, Israel, Western Europe, South Africa, remote Pacific islands, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, the United States, Atlantic and Pacific coasts, Alaska and the Aleutians, Hawaiian Islands, Marianas, the Sea
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There were so many memorable moments during my 37 years as a ship's communications officer.

  1. participated in the communications liaison with NASA for the maiden voyage of the space shuttle.
  2. It circumnavigated the globe and transited the Panama Canal several times.
  3. Diving wrecks, caves, blue walls, lava tubes, jellyfish lakes in Micronesia, the Red Sea, the Mediterranean, Hawaii, the Channel Islands and the Florida Keys
  4. toured Egypt, Israel, Western Europe, South Africa, remote Pacific islands, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, the United States, Atlantic and Pacific coasts, Alaska and the Aleutians, Hawaiian Islands, Marianas, Marshal Islands, Republic of Palau

The most memorable thing was the day I left. The whole week before I left, I was training my replacement. I retired on Friday and the apprentice resigned on Monday. Apparently it was more work than they could handle. They asked me to go back and train someone else, but I declined.

I have not retired yet, but I am approaching that age. I've worked for the same company for over 30 years and I can predict what that day will be like ...

Most of my colleagues have already retired and those who stay will probably retire before me. There are a lot of new people and most of them are younger than my adult children. They don't know me and I don't know them.

My last day will go unnoticed. There may be some people I still know, and I may wander around a bit and say goodbye. At the end of the day, I will hand over my badge and they will escort me out of

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I have not retired yet, but I am approaching that age. I've worked for the same company for over 30 years and I can predict what that day will be like ...

Most of my colleagues have already retired and those who stay will probably retire before me. There are a lot of new people and most of them are younger than my adult children. They don't know me and I don't know them.

My last day will go unnoticed. There may be some people I still know, and I may wander around a bit and say goodbye. At the end of the day, I will hand over my badge and they will escort me out the door. I'll walk to my car and won't even look back. While I will always be grateful for my job and the income that allowed me to buy a home and raise a family, I will not miss working here.

The company has become a sad and dysfunctional shadow of its former self, and I remember that every day when I walk across campus to the building where I work. The workforce is less than half what it was before, buildings show signs of disrepair, and structures and equipment that were once so proudly erected are being demolished and dismantled.

There was a time when the company invested in its employees. They offered an attractive 401k savings plan and a pension. They rented an entire water park for their annual spring picnic, and at Christmas they gave the employees a voucher and invited them to a Holiday on Ice show, where there were stacks of Christmas presents for everyone's kids. There were two softball fields and an archery range on campus, and there was an employee club that offered a long list of local discounts, as well as discounts on tickets to Sea World Universal Studios and Disneyland. Retirements were important. The company bought a big cake and employees from all departments would come and say goodbye to the retiree.

All of that is gone.

Fortunately, I was able to keep my pension. But it hasn't been offered to new hires for many years. When I walk out that door for the last time, I will be one of the last representatives of a bygone age and there will be no one left to remember how things were.

Thanks Kevin for the A2A!

Military veterans, regardless of country or branch of service, will understand the wisdom of these words:

So one fine fall day, I and nineteen other Airmen from my squad took a quick helicopter ride during the day from our little Army camp to Camp Victory in Baghdad for a meeting that turned out to be as productive as meetings tend to be. military. After a trip to the DFAC (chow hall) for dinner, we went to the passenger terminal to catch our helicopter back. Between an empty Blackhawk and a partially filled Chinook, there were exactly 18 empty seats. As the ranking ofi

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Thanks Kevin for the A2A!

Military veterans, regardless of country or branch of service, will understand the wisdom of these words:

So one fine fall day, I and nineteen other Airmen from my squad took a quick helicopter ride during the day from our little Army camp to Camp Victory in Baghdad for a meeting that turned out to be as productive as meetings tend to be. military. After a trip to the DFAC (chow hall) for dinner, we went to the passenger terminal to catch our helicopter back. Between an empty Blackhawk and a partially filled Chinook, there were exactly 18 empty seats. As a rank officer, I volunteered and with my captain, who was a great guy and a hilarious joker, to look forward to the next trip that was scheduled in an hour. At this point, the situation was simply

SNAFU *

What the crew at the passenger terminal announced as an hour of wait turned into two, then four before an empty Blackhawk finally arrived. We were happy to get back to our camp and our own small beds instead of having to find a spare cot at Camp Victory, so after checking with the crew that they were flying to our camp, we hopped on.

Ten minutes after takeoff, I knew something was wrong. We started flying west to our camp, but after a few minutes we turned right and started flying almost directly north. Since the crew hadn't given us a headset, we had no idea of ​​our change of destination. We flew for a good half hour before descending rapidly but under control towards… absolutely nothing. The situation had now progressed to

TARFU **

Looking down, I saw a dusty square concrete platform with a few almost invisible blue flight line lights glowing faintly in the middle of nowhere. No buildings, no other lights, no people. As soon as we landed, one of the crew members yelled over the noise of the rotors "Jump and wait here, we'll be back in half an hour!" Was he fucking with us? Leaving two Air Force officers with nothing but a pair of M9 pistols, no communications, no maps, no security, and no idea where we were at half past zero in the middle of Iraq? Only the bloody Army could think this was a good idea. The situation had now bottomed out in

FUBAR ***

We got out and the helicopter took off quickly to the north, leaving two hapless airmen stranded in the desert. Adrenaline rushed through me as I had unpleasant memories of the capture exercise from our pre-deployment escape and evasion course. It took us only a few minutes to explore the helipad and the surrounding area to discover how completely helpless we were. Anyone with a rifle and night vision goggles could easily catch us. If the moon came out, they wouldn't even need NVG. We were easy ducks.

On the plus side, even though it was past midnight and the sky was completely cloud-free, it wasn't too cold. After a while, the concept of time just disappeared and I will never forget how incredibly bright the stars were in the dark, shining like jewels hanging out of the reach of my head. I've never seen anything like it. We live in an amazing universe.

As expected, half an hour passed with no signals from the helicopter, then an hour. It was after two in the morning when we finally heard the beautiful sound of the rotors approaching from the south. It wasn't the same helicopter or crew, and we landed and took off at two other campsites before finally being dropped off at ours. If the second team knew what happened to the first, they didn't bother to share that information with us. We were happy to be alive and in one piece, and we returned to our complex for a few hours of sleep. Too much to volunteer.

* SNAFU: Normal situation ... All screwed up

** TARFU: Things are really screwed

*** FUBAR: Fucked beyond all recognition

I worked part-time at a call center in Manila in my last year of college. It was the age of pagers, where people can send 25-character alphanumeric texts to someone with a pager.

After the theory orientation, the trainers took us to a small enclosed space away from the main service queue, so that wobbly newbies could practice on the phone system answering real calls from customers. My interlocutor came in, and I was a nervous wreck because of the complicated buttons I need to press to accept calls and make sure I have the mental alertness to transcribe everything on my PC. I guess my nervous tension ca

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I worked part-time at a call center in Manila in my last year of college. It was the age of pagers, where people can send 25-character alphanumeric texts to someone with a pager.

After the theory orientation, the trainers took us to a small enclosed space away from the main service queue, so that wobbly newbies could practice on the phone system answering real calls from customers. My interlocutor came, and I was nervous about the complicated buttons I need to press to accept calls and make sure I have the mental alertness to transcribe everything on my PC. I guess my nervous tension came through the phone lines, as after the caller gave me his text message, he asked, "Is this your first day at work?" I answered yes, and he said something that still warms my heart to this day: “Take it easy and don't let doubt defeat you. Just keep learning and improving day by day, and one day, you'll see how far you've come and how dumb your nerves are from day one. Keep believing in yourself and one day you will reach much greater heights! "When I asked him his name, I almost fell out of my seat knowing that the caller was the self-made billionaire Asian mogul Lucio Tan.

In that same job, I also had some fun and memorable moments. One day a heartbroken woman called and dictated a very raw message of pain to the guy who 'cheated on' her. Each incoming call customer was allowed only 2 message transmissions of 25 characters each, and if they wanted to send a longer message, they would have to call back. I felt so bad for the caller that I let him dictate a third broadcast message. I was writing when there was a short power outage that caused the system to flicker, and everything I wrote disappeared on my screen! Now, how do you tell a distressed and crying person to repeat the message they just told you? I quickly scrawled the rest of his message on paper and paraphrased his previous message that was deleted. Fortunately,

Another fun moment was when a man called to send a loving and passionate text message to a girlfriend. I realized that the girlfriend was a college classmate, and she was really flushed after transcribing the steamy comments. I didn't have the nerve to tell him that I knew the recipient of the message!

I worked as an emergency room physician for 40 years, the last thirteen years in a Veterans Administration Hospital. From what I could determine, I was the oldest ER doctor working a full-time line position in Florida. My plan was to work until I was 70 and then retire with nine months to go to achieve that goal.

Most of my time there I worked on what in federal parlance is a compressed work schedule (CRW). (three shifts of 13 hours and 20 minutes per week). Our vacation days accumulated and used in full days and in 13 years I had accumulated quite a few and wanted to use them. My wife and I always had

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I worked as an emergency room physician for 40 years, the last thirteen years in a Veterans Administration Hospital. From what I could determine, I was the oldest ER doctor working a full-time line position in Florida. My plan was to work until I was 70 and then retire with nine months to go to achieve that goal.

Most of my time there I worked on what in federal parlance is a compressed work schedule (CRW). (three shifts of 13 hours and 20 minutes per week). Our vacation days accumulated and used in full days and in 13 years I had accumulated quite a few and wanted to use them. My wife and I have always wanted to cruise around the world. This required an extended absence which was approved by all the powers that be and we had a great time.

My prolonged absence apparently caught the attention of some of the non-ER doctors and the green-eyed monster of jealousy appeared. A few months after my return, I was notified that there was "an investigation" underway and friends in a position to know informed me that I was the main focus. (Interestingly, they had been ordered not to share anything with anyone and threatened with disciplinary action, including job loss, if they mentioned anything about it.)

One of the most insidious weapons in the federal criminal arsenal is the small item known as a "trial offense." The target of the investigation may be found not to be at fault for the original offense, but a simple misstatement of facts or failure to cooperate is actionable for obstructing the investigation in some specific way. It is a trap that must be avoided assiduously.

I was contacted and instructed to meet with the investigators (a team consisting mainly of administrators). I asked and told him that I was expected to give testimony under oath with a stenographer present. I asked and they informed me that I could not bring a lawyer or union representative with me, in fact I could not bring anyone, nor could I record the process nor would they give me a copy of the transcript.

Here I was just nine months from retirement! There was no reason to stay, except to want to set a record. I immediately went to my supervisor's office and said “I'm quitting! How fast can I get out of here? "

"When would you like to have your last shift?"

"Can you cover this one?" (It had just started!) He smiled kindly and we agreed that it would be over in two days. "

About a week after I retired, I received a phone call from one of the administrative secretaries who wanted to know when they could schedule my "meeting" with the research panel. I said that I would be happy to meet them informally. Errors in calculating my leave time, if any, were made by the computer system or someone else; He had requested and received permission. Everything was in order and I knew it! - but they insisted on the rules of “no witnesses, no lawyer, no union representative and under oath”. There were no law enforcement agencies involved. There were no formal charges, no subpoenas, nothing. Just this committee meeting and insisting on its own rules.

I asked the administrative secretary if I could give them a literal message and she said she would. "Tell them they can fuck off." That was the last I heard from them.

I did not want to answer this question. Simply because I don't know how to put it in writing. so powerful and emotional moments "only in Russia". Well here it goes.

Go to the forest as a family.

Grandparents, parents and children on the weekend. Pack a lunch or bring kitchen utensils.

Take the train to the forest. No kidding, they have stations in the woods. Only for that purpose. No towns or villages, just forest.

Then we are going to collect wild mushrooms and fruits.

You were once in a Russian forest. It's lovely. Nature is respected. Nobody throws garbage. If you find someone else's trash,

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I did not want to answer this question. Simply because I don't know how to put it in writing. so powerful and emotional moments "only in Russia". Well here it goes.

Go to the forest as a family.

Grandparents, parents and children on the weekend. Pack a lunch or bring kitchen utensils.

Take the train to the forest. No kidding, they have stations in the woods. Only for that purpose. No towns or villages, just forest.

Then we are going to collect wild mushrooms and fruits.

You were once in a Russian forest. It's lovely. Nature is respected. Nobody throws garbage. If you find someone else's trash, they tend to pick it up.

This tree is birch or beroska in Russian.

The forest is full of them. For Russians, they maintain some mystical spiritual ties with Russia to the point of missing them. They sing songs about them, they paint hundreds of masterpieces of them. I can not explain it. However, it makes me want to buy an air ticket every time I see a photo.

You mate with adults and go to collect mushrooms. They are millions. The children pick it up and show it to the adult. Only then does it enter the basket. Are so many. Some are weird, some are not. Some taste like nuts, others like asparagus. My grandparents knew all of them.

Then all of a sudden you run through an all red meadow of wild strawberries

Or raspberry

Or gooseberry or any other berry. So we also choose them.

Grandma is going to make jam.

At lunchtime we make a bonfire and fry mushrooms with potatoes. Eat it with black bread and pickles. Food never tasted better.

We put out the fire and headed home.

The mushrooms would be dried or pickled.

Jams are made and everything goes to the basement of my grandparents' traditional Russian hut like this one

That was decades ago. The grandparents left a long time ago, and with them the mushroom picking. None of my cousins ​​know which mushrooms are safe. The old house also disappeared and a Soviet apartment building is in its place.

Drink tea like a Russian.

Tea is drunk in saucers

Or thick glass glasses on a metal stand like in this picture.

The water is kept warm in a samovar. The kettle is for the tea concentrate. Dilute to taste with hot water.

Russians don't put sugar in tea. The tea is unsweetened. They bite into a sugar cube and chase it with tea.

Jam is not preserved in bread. Like sugar, you eat it straight and chase it with the unsweetened tea.

Russians would not normally use milk in their tea.

It's practically drunk like this today. Except for the samovar. Nobody bothers with that anymore.

The police broke down the door of our small apartment, weapons in hand, and threw my mother and her man to the ground, handcuffed them and beat them (with the butts of their pistols) while other policemen searched the apartment.

I was seven.

My mother was the most wanted person in Turkiye at the time and had committed numerous bank fraud, was the leader of an extortion scam and was suspected of smuggling hashish. His photo appeared on the front page of daily newspapers frequently. She had managed to scam American Express out of several thousand dollars, and they had put a bounty on her

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The police broke down the door of our small apartment, weapons in hand, and threw my mother and her man to the ground, handcuffed them and beat them (with the butts of their pistols) while other policemen searched the apartment.

I was seven.

My mother was the most wanted person in Turkiye at the time and had committed numerous bank fraud, was the leader of an extortion scam and was suspected of smuggling hashish. His photo appeared on the front page of daily newspapers frequently. He had managed to scam American Express out of several thousand dollars, and they had offered him a reward for his capture.

Our life was a great roller coaster. Either we were wealthy and lived in multi-bedroom villas and condos or we were broke and on the brink of starvation. This was during one of our near-starvation episodes, which were much more common than not.

My sister and I were forced to sit on the couch and watch the police destroy our few possessions. My sister reached under the cushions, took off the Colt .45 Semiautomatic, and tucked it into her pants. That was something that would have given my mother and her man a minimum of 20 years if they had found them.

She finally convinced the police to let her take me to the park so I wouldn't have to watch my mom and Oktay get beaten up. We left and she tossed the gun into a neighbor's weed-infested backyard, to be retrieved later. We knew how valuable the gun was, like three months of food and a valuable rent.

Police found a 30-kilo bag of hashish under the sink and Mom took the blame. She was sentenced to seven years in prison and we went back to live with my maternal grandmother, in an older part of Istanbul.

I still remember every detail of that morning, from the dark and damp surroundings of the apartment, to the smell of dust from the moldy basement walls and the ashes that spilled from the detectives' cigarette as it hung from the corner of his mouth. I remember what my sister was wearing, what my mother told the police officer that she wanted to search my sister and me, and the general air of now that permeated our bus ride to Grandma's apartment.

I remember it almost every day.

My last job before my unplanned retirement at the age of 40 was as Regional Head of Commercial and Retail Banking for one of the largest banks in Pakistan. There were 35 branches in the retail and commercial banking segment that were under my supervision.

Unplanned, if someone could be inquisitive because I was the victim of a planned conspiracy that was the result of organizational politics and was made to make this decision within an hour, whereas there was no such intention on my part an hour before taking the decision.

After I retired from work, I spent almost a year searching

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My last job before my unplanned retirement at the age of 40 was as Regional Head of Commercial and Retail Banking for one of the largest banks in Pakistan. There were 35 branches in the retail and commercial banking segment that were under my supervision.

Unplanned, if someone could be inquisitive because I was the victim of a planned conspiracy that was the result of organizational politics and was made to make this decision within an hour, whereas there was no such intention on my part an hour before taking the decision.

After I retired from work, I spent almost a year looking for another job with a similar salary structure and job function, but that did not happen. Few opportunities came, but all demanded a substantial discount on salary or job title. So, after almost a year of failed efforts, I decided to say goodbye to my banking career spanning more than 17 years full of enthusiasm, vigor and dedication. Banking was actually more of a passion for me than anything else in life. This was the only career I studied shortly after completing my graduation and completing my Master's degree in the Banking and Finance field alongside my work at the Bank. I used to aspire to be the president of some bank one day.

Anyway, this is all history now and after losing a year without finding a similar job, I decided not to commit and decided to change my career path completely by believing in my own capabilities and divine support.

There used to be a hardware store in Maryland called Hechingers (sp). It was kind of a precursor to Lowe's and Home Depot. I'm pretty sure their promotion eventually put them out of business.

We lived in a small town 30 miles from his closest store. I wanted to install one of those dusk-to-dawn sodium vapor security lights outside our back door to light up our backyard. We drove the 30 miles and the only light they had was the display model that was bolted to the wall. A young sales associate wandered aimlessly around the department (lighting) where she was assigned to work.

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There used to be a hardware store in Maryland called Hechingers (sp). It was kind of a precursor to Lowe's and Home Depot. I'm pretty sure their promotion eventually put them out of business.

We lived in a small town 30 miles from his closest store. I wanted to install one of those dusk-to-dawn sodium vapor security lights outside our back door to light up our backyard. We drove the 30 miles and the only light they had was the display model that was bolted to the wall. A young sales associate wandered aimlessly around the department (lighting) where she was assigned to work. I asked if they had more in stock. Without moving an inch, he said no. There was a phone right at a support stand near where we were standing, so I asked if I could call the next closest store about 15 miles away to see if they had one in stock. These stores had fast connections between stores, so you didn't even have to dial 10-digit numbers to connect to the store and lighting department there. She told me,

I'm getting very frustrated at this point and a bit angry. Just as I'm about to start talking to her, the department manager comes over and asks me if there is a problem. I explained what was happening and how her partner had refused to help me because it was not her job. He looked at her and told her to go back to her office and that he would speak to her as soon as she finished helping me. He assured me that he could and would help. He picked up the phone next to where we were standing, dialed about 2 numbers and was directly connected to the other store, told them what he was looking for and in less than 5 minutes he found that they had the item in stock and saved me. an additional 15 mile trip if the light wasn't there. They actually took the item out at the other store and had it waiting for me when I got there.

I don't know what happened to the young woman because IT WAS NOT MY JOB to stay and find out. I had to buy and install a light.

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