What is the most creative way to describe your work?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Ryder Combs



What is the most creative way to describe your work?

WE MAKE DISTINCTIVITY HOME DETAILING FOR THE DIGNIFIED

Housewives

I think I defined it in the best possible way with class. Not to say that I am not less intelligent or less motivated than anyone else, it is right at this moment in life, it is a reward that other people ask you to come work for them. I guess I've been lucky because all my jobs since the 70's have been jobs where employers called me to see if we could work for them (believe it or not, I've never been back to some) and it wasn't because their houses were wrong. Knowing how little time we spent

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WE MAKE DISTINCTIVITY HOME DETAILING FOR THE DIGNIFIED

Housewives

I think I defined it in the best possible way with class. Not to say that I am not less intelligent or less motivated than anyone else, it is right at this moment in life, it is a reward that other people ask you to come work for them. I guess I've been lucky because all my jobs since the 70's have been jobs where employers called me to see if we could work for them (believe it or not, I've never been back to some) and it wasn't because their houses were wrong. Knowing how little time we spend in our clients' homes, we appreciate their trust, respect, and enjoy making their wonderful collectibles shine. It's fun to help keep others organized, every two weeks they can wait for us and be on a reboot!

My first client wanted to see my sample work in content writing and copywriting, but I had no prior copywriting experience, so I decided to do some demos:

I got the job and he's still impressed with my creativity.

If there was ever a verbal sobriety test, this would be it! But then why twist your tongue when naming someone a Point of Sale Associate, when everyone knows she's the cashier?

Here are some pots:

Commodore George Dewey of the Asian American Squadron was ordered to rename the Spanish warships taken as booty in Manila after the Spanish-American War. The order was simple: name them as universities. He replied that he would call them "USS Massachusetts Institute of Technology" and "USS Vermont Normal University for Women." The War and Navy Department scrapped the idea fairly quickly.

When my

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If there was ever a verbal sobriety test, this would be it! But then why twist your tongue when naming someone a Point of Sale Associate, when everyone knows she's the cashier?

Here are some pots:

Commodore George Dewey of the Asian American Squadron was ordered to rename the Spanish warships taken as booty in Manila after the Spanish-American War. The order was simple: name them as universities. He replied that he would call them "USS Massachusetts Institute of Technology" and "USS Vermont Normal University for Women." The War and Navy Department scrapped the idea fairly quickly.

When my boss asked me what I was studying, I nervously mentioned, "An Associate in Computer Science and Information Science - Network, Security, and Systems Administration - Business Systems Management Emphasis." You should have seen the expression on his face: puzzled and almost lost!

So why complicate job titles when they're poisoning officers at Shake Shack? You know the customer is drunk when he calls you "tarbender." Either way, I'll take some rocks at Dack Janiels.

Health!

"The best startup ideas tend to have three things in common: They are something that the founders themselves want, that they can build themselves, and that few others realize is worth doing," Graham said in a blog post. in November.

"Microsoft, Apple, Yahoo, Google, and Facebook all started this way."

Now that the work year is well under way, there will be many dissatisfied employees who will have their brains racked by that one business concept that will make them their fortune.

Here are the stories of five great ideas that really made it into blockbuster businesses:

1. Innocent drinks

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"The best startup ideas tend to have three things in common: They are something that the founders themselves want, that they can build themselves, and that few others realize is worth doing," Graham said in a blog post. in November.

"Microsoft, Apple, Yahoo, Google, and Facebook all started this way."

Now that the work year is well under way, there will be many dissatisfied employees who will have their brains racked by that one business concept that will make them their fortune.

Here are the stories of five great ideas that really made it into blockbuster businesses:

1. Innocent drinks

Friends Adam Balon, Jon Wright and Richard Reed seemed to have been quite well established after leaving Cambridge University.

Two became management consultants. One went to advertising. They all made a lot of money and lived comfortable lives in London.

But there was a persistent shared feeling that there was something more to life. On a snowboarding vacation in 1998, the trio did little more than brainstorm ideas for a new business.

They realized there was a gap in the market for a new type of smoothie product, one based on natural ingredients and overtly ethical values.

After spending six months mixing different fruit combinations at home, the trio set up a booth at a music festival to test the concept.

The decision to continue was left entirely to the consumers. A sign above the booth read "Shall we quit our job to make these shakes?" One container said "Yes", the other "No". Customers would make their judgment by throwing their empty bottles into any of the bins.

Happily, the "yes" won. Balon, Wright and Reed wrote and rewrote their business plan 11 times, before being turned down by a succession of potential investors and banks for financing.

A desperate email with the subject "Does anyone know someone rich?" it was sent out to everyone the founders knew, resulting in Maurice Pinto, a wealthy American businessman, contributing £ 250,000.

Innocent Drinks made its first million turnover in its second year and now sells around two million shakes a week, with a 75% market share in the UK. In 2009, Coca-Cola acquired an 18% stake in the company for £ 30 million. A year later, the beverage giant paid £ 65m for a 58% stake.

Reed says, “If you're 70% sure of an idea, go for it. Because if you wait until you are 100% confident in business ... you will never make a decision, you will never get anywhere. "

2. 99 designs

Australian businessman Mark Harbottle made a rather strange decision in 1999 when he decided to start a business with Matt Mickiewicz, a Canadian who was in the year 10. But the move paid off.

"I was 26 and he was 16 (but) age didn't come into play," says Harbottle. “I saw that he was a smart kid who knew what he was doing. He was making a few thousand dollars a week through his site. Matt put in a few thousand dollars to finance it and I put in 400 dollars. "

The web developer business, Sitepoint, was hit by a serious drop in ad dollars during the dotcom crash. Harbottle and Mickiewicz came up with the idea of ​​providing high-quality content to web developers in print.

“Our customers were printing information from the web, so we thought, let's do something here,” says Harbottle. “The idea came through that. You could call it crowdsourcing, in a way. It was about figuring out what customers wanted and responding to that. "

“We printed a book on demand and it was a success. We now have about 60 books. "

SitePoint may have modified its business model to become a traditional publisher, but it was its continued innovation online that triggered the launch of 99Designs.

The large community of developers and designers who gathered online in the SitePoint forum regularly played what Harbottle calls "Photoshop tennis" by working on logos for fictional projects, for a bit of friendly competition, and to hone their skills.

The dynamic changed when a small business owner asked the community to create a brand for him.

Recalls Mickiewicz: "It was a revolutionary way to outsource graphic design work and literally dozens of times better than the next best alternative."

"After a while, when it became clear that this organic model had lasting power, we started charging each 'contest supervisor' $ 10 for posting a design job request on our forums and we quickly started generating thousands of revenue." .

Adds Harbottle: "There was a huge surge of interest in the idea, so we thought, 'We have to build a site for this, it's not cool to have it in a forum.'

The site allows companies to post design work online, with freelance designers competing with each other to create the best solution and claim commissioned pay.

Five years since launch, more than $ 45 million has been paid to the 99designs community. The company has 70 employees in Australia, the US, Germany, France and London and raised $ 35 million in funding in 2011.

3. 1-800-FLOWERS

American businessman James McCann had an unremarkable career as a bartender and later as a social worker.

It's fair to say that this CV doesn't point to what he did next: shake up the entire retail model and become one of the online pioneers.

McCann opened his first flower shop, called Flora Plenty, in 1976. But it wasn't until he bought the mnemonic phone number 1-800-FLOWERS in 1986 and, in a radical move for the time, changed the company name to party, that his business really took off.

According to his autobiography, McCann decided that he would build a nationwide flower delivery service by "listening to the radio while shaving."

The company was the first to put a toll-free number in its name and was one of the first retailers in the world to have an online presence after striking a deal with CompuServe and AOL in 1992.

Many of the moves made by McCann in the early 1990s are now standard for retail companies around the world. Many new operations consider having their name woven into their phone number, while a growing number of companies are realizing that a website is an essential part of sales.

In 1999, the company went public and added a dot com to its name. Revenues reached $ 668 million in 2010.

4. Airbnb

Joe Gebbia and Brian Chesky were sharing a San Francisco loft apartment in 2007 when they realized that attendees of a major design conference in the city were going to have a hard time finding a room for the night.

With nearly every hotel room in the city booked, Gebbia and Chesky, struggling to pay the rent, seized the opportunity.

They opened the doors of their house, offering strangers the opportunity to sleep on two air mats on the floor and eat a homemade breakfast.

As the Airbnb website says: "Two air mattresses, a thousand dollars, three new friends, and many high-fives later, the entrepreneurs realized an opportunity."

With the addition of tech assistant Nathan Blecharczyk, the team decided to change the hosting model by allowing people to list their own places to stay online, with the new business, Belong Anywhere, earning income through a fee of between 6% and 12%. depending on the price of the reservation.

Initially focusing on large-scale events where accommodation would be in short supply, the trio raised cash for the company in an unusual way: They sold $ 30,000 worth of special-edition breakfast cereals they created, based on then-US presidential candidates. Barack Obama and John McCain. .

In 2008, the name was shortened to Airbnb and users were able to book entire properties, boats, and even private islands, rather than just a couch for the night.

In June of last year, the company revealed that it had booked its 10 millionth night, and 75% of these bookings occurred outside of its initial US market.

There have been problems, like the public relations disaster of a woman who blogged that her apartment had been vandalized by an Airbnb tenant. Chesky wrote a regretful response, admitting that the company had "dropped the ball" and introduced insurance and a 24-hour helpline to help fix future problems.

Airbnb now has listings in 33,000 cities in 192 countries. It has also raised $ 120 million in venture capital and is valued at $ 1.3 billion.

Chesky told CNN: "Sometimes it takes a new set of eyes to see a problem and see it as an opportunity, not just the way things are or should be."

"I think being a young entrepreneur is a great opportunity to challenge the status quo and build the world as you think it should be."

Read more at: Five Top Business Ideas That Made Millions

When I was preparing for the interviews, this was the most difficult and time-consuming question to prepare. This will be asked of you first in any job interview you request.

Framing a short, impressive answer takes time. I had read many examples on the internet and on Quora before deciding what to tell an interviewer about me.

Generally, a good response is something that should take about 2 to 5 minutes. You have to judge how much time the interviewer is willing to spend on this question. For ex. During my interview with Goldman Sachs, the interviewer asked me to explain in

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When I was preparing for the interviews, this was the most difficult and time-consuming question to prepare. This will be asked of you first in any job interview you request.

Framing a short, impressive answer takes time. I had read many examples on the internet and on Quora before deciding what to tell an interviewer about me.

Generally, a good response is something that should take about 2 to 5 minutes. You have to judge how much time the interviewer is willing to spend on this question. For ex. During my interview with Goldman Sachs, the interviewer asked me to explain in 2 minutes while, at McKinsey, the interviewers were not in such a rush.

So it all depends.

Points to remember when describing yourself:

  1. It is not necessary to repeat every point on your resume.
  2. Divide the answer into parts.
    1. If you are just out of college, start with the name of your college and the CPI (if it's worth mentioning). Then mention your values ​​as you used to say in this line: "I believe that I am a diligent person and setting personal goals and achieving them gives me an immense sense of satisfaction."
    2. Then I would talk about my internships / projects and the skills I acquired from them. Skills like working in a challenging environment, etc. along with technical skills.
    3. I would then add my PORs, extracurriculars, sports experience, hobbies, etc., which are not mentioned on my resume, and a summary attached to any experiences.
  3. Remember to always tell the truth. Interviewers are much smarter than you. A counter question that is not answered properly can leave a negative impact during interviews.
  4. It is up to you to mold your prepared response and present it in front of the interviewer. For ex. Tech profiles don't want to know about your extracurricular activities and would be more interested in learning about your programming skills and projects. Consulting profiles would like to know your multifaceted side. So know your role and then prepare yourself.
  5. Also, try to focus on saying things that are not on your resume and mention the skills you learned from that particular experience.
  6. Practice this in front of the mirror no more than 2 to 3 times before the interview. You don't have to clutter it up like you used to do on school days. It should come out naturally.

All the best!

PS: There is no set rule for describing yourself during interviews. You can talk about yourself in any way that makes you appear confident and prepared for the interview. I had done a lot of research myself while preparing the correct answer for myself. So take your time!

Almost all recent graduates can agree that getting a job has become a job in itself. Gone are the days when you just sat in college and expected recruiters to come call when they came during career weeks.

Today the way employees are hired has changed. There are methods that give you a greater chance of landing a job than outdated ones.

For instance:

  1. Get your name on AdWords - There's a guy named Alec Brownstein who used this trick. First, he made sure he knew the names of New York's top advertising directors. Then it happened
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Almost all recent graduates can agree that getting a job has become a job in itself. Gone are the days when you just sat in college and expected recruiters to come call when they came during career weeks.

Today the way employees are hired has changed. There are methods that give you a greater chance of landing a job than outdated ones.

For instance:

  1. Get your name on AdWords - There's a guy named Alec Brownstein who used this trick. First, he made sure he knew the names of New York's top advertising directors. He then spent a total of $ 6 to buy Google ads that would appear at the top of searches when those directors Google their own names. They were surprised that when they Googled his own name, his ad was the first thing that came up and this landed him a job at one of those advertising companies that surely praised him for his own creativity.
  2. Use video: Unfortunately, using the standard CV and the old cover letter combination is no longer enough. You can stand out by sending a personalized thank you video instead of the normal thank you email.
  3. Get a website - You must get a personal website and have your own domain name, even if it is basic. This will give recruiters a place to find all of your relevant information without overdoing it. You should also not forget to attach the link to all of your profiles, emails, and business cards.
  4. Starting a blog: There is a very good example of someone who got a job after starting a blog. He was known as Kevin Spirit. He even admitted that his job interview was terrible, but he was hired because of his online presence.

1. Income generator

"I am confident in my abilities to produce and as I prepare for the worst, I do the work necessary to tilt the odds for the best to happen."

2. Best performer

"I want to be judged on individual performance and I want to be rewarded for my efforts based on their performance."

3. Vision for success

"I am looking to work for a successful company that has strong leadership and vision and that recognizes and rewards artists."

4. Growth and development

"I am someone who is constantly growing and who takes the time to continue learning even if it is not a direct requirement.

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1. Income generator

"I am confident in my abilities to produce and as I prepare for the worst, I do the work necessary to tilt the odds for the best to happen."

2. Best performer

"I want to be judged on individual performance and I want to be rewarded for my efforts based on their performance."

3. Vision for success

"I am looking to work for a successful company that has strong leadership and vision and that recognizes and rewards artists."

4. Growth and development

"I am someone who is constantly growing and who takes the time to continue learning even if it is not a direct requirement of the job. I find that many times it is a combination of what you study, both directly and indirectly related to work."

5. Goal oriented

"I'm modest, but I work hard and constantly set firm goals for myself. Then, once I've set the benchmarks, I take the necessary steps to achieve those milestones."

6. Customer-centric

"Someone who has a consultative selling style and is concerned with customer needs, constantly asking questions to find out what the customer really wants and then meeting those requirements."

7. Positive self-initiator

"Someone who thinks positively and can execute difficult tasks. I am not a person who needs to be micromanaged. Rather, when assigned a specific task, I can find the best way to solve the problem autonomously."

My fancy title is Radiology Technologist. But I prefer to use X-ray Tech when talking to most people because it is clear and unambiguous to almost everyone. But I really do consider myself a Rad Tech because I'm pretty radical!

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