What is the minimum age to work at Google or other technology companies?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Corey Davis



What is the minimum age to work at Google or other technology companies?

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I do not believe that any company imposes a minimum age. Most companies only specify the minimum qualifications or minimum experience to apply for a specific position. Most companies require you to complete a degree, and depending on the length of the degree, a person's age can vary.

I BELIEVE SO BUT friend you have to prove yourself with some incredibly amazing ideas that draw the world's attention to you and only then will Google be able to track a person of your level, because your current rating does not make you eligible to apply. at the MNC.

All the best

I worked for Google for about 4 years and from my experience, being interviewed for roles at Google many times, both before my employment at Google and afterwards, for different roles while working there, I can say that there are many factors that influence the decision. of hiring someone for a position and sometimes they are not fair. Here are some factors that many people are unaware of.

1 - Does Google hire the smartest people?

No. I can say that Google's hiring process is most of the time very efficient and they do not hire the smartest people, but the most suitable for a certain position.

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I worked for Google for about 4 years and from my experience, being interviewed for roles at Google many times, both before my employment at Google and afterwards, for different roles while working there, I can say that there are many factors that influence the decision. of hiring someone for a position and sometimes they are not fair. Here are some factors that many people are unaware of.

1 - Does Google hire the smartest people?

No. I can say that Google's hiring process is most of the time very efficient and they do not hire the smartest people, but the most suitable for a certain role. They are really smart. It's not just about your knowledge and skills, it's also about how well you perform in that position.

2 - Is the Google interview process very difficult?

Yes and No. It depends. It will depend on the interviewer, recruiter and how long the position has been open, how quickly they need someone for the position, and the skills of other candidates. Some interviewers want to hire a copy of themselves and in this case, no matter how good you are, if you don't share the same style and personality as the hiring manager, you won't get the job.

3 - Most of the time they have someone in mind for the role.

I can explain that in more detail later, but at Google they need to interview multiple people for a position. Sometimes they loved the first candidate and when you showed up for the interview they already fell in love with someone else. However, they are still obliged to interview the other candidates and sometimes they will do it very badly because they see it as a waste of time. In cases like that, you will probably walk out of the interview feeling like you won't get the job.

4 - Are you always looking to hire the best candidate?

Not always. There are a lot of insider recommendations for roles, and unless the person someone referred you is really bad and you're incredibly good at what you do, chances are you won't get the role.

Google is the company where I saw the highest number of Googlers friends, husbands, wives, boyfriends, girlfriends, brothers and sisters hired. In my team, at least 25% of the people have a family member or someone very close who works at Google.

5 - Heart rate can be very lazy

You have to think in terms of supply and demand to understand the recruitment process at Google. They have hundreds, sometimes thousands of people applying for a position on Google. They don't need to scout for talent (although most of the time they do), they already have millions of people wanting to work for them.

For that reason, recruiters are sometimes really disorganized and don't care much about you and can't send you enough information that you will need to perform well in the interview.

But that is not the rule. I believe that most of the time they do a decent job and in their defense they receive thousands of applications a month, 95% of the time from people who are not suitable for the position.

6 - You need to be lucky

I have a friend at Google who said that his technical interview questions were very similar to the questions he had been practicing in a book on technical interview questions. He was fortunate to be prepared to answer all the questions correctly and faster. I know another guy who is really normal, but who worked with a Googler at an agency and when a position became available they recommended him for the position.

You have to keep in mind that the hiring process in Google is not perfect. I think there is a lot of decision-making power in the hiring manager's hand.

7 - There are many average people

One thing you hear a lot during your first few months at Google is about imposter syndrome. Google has amazing people working for them and some of the brightest people I had the pleasure of working with I met at Google. However, there are also many average people. What you don't see is anyone below average. Everyone has at least enough skills to do a reasonable job. I think Google is good at providing a fertile environment for personal growth. It also challenges you to keep improving, but still, there are some folks who are happy enough to be on Google and not worried about improvement.

8 - Non-technical roles

Non-technical roles are the most difficult because it is difficult to establish the correct success metrics for a candidate. Technical roles are easier because 70% of the process is to show that you have great skills and your methods to solve a problem.

When it comes to non-technical roles it is very easy to get a false positive. It's not hard to cheat the process if you're really good at interviewing or the hiring manager isn't very skilled either. I worked for a large, well-known company where the team leader was not really trained and unprepared for his role, but his manager (the department director) was also untrained and unprepared. So if you're applying for a position where hiring managers are bad at what they do, chances are they will hire someone just as bad as they are. In my case, I was hired because someone else with great influence in the company decided that I was the right candidate.

9 - Googleness

You hear a lot about Googleness, but I think that as long as you don't do something really awkward or unprofessional during the interview, Googleness isn't that important. Googleness is a "metric" that shows how apt you are to work in the Google environment.

If you can forgive an older man for offering a free perspective, I recommend that you focus on becoming a great engineer, rather than setting a goal like "I want to get into Google." Once you start honing your skills and getting finer, you can always go places and your perspective on who you want to be will evolve significantly over time. Remember that companies are huge bodies and there are many factors that influence how happy an engineer is in a place. Google is a great company, but it also has wear and tear.

Since it is starting quite early,

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If you can forgive an older man for offering a free perspective, I recommend that you focus on becoming a great engineer, rather than setting a goal like "I want to get into Google." Once you start honing your skills and getting finer, you can always go places and your perspective on who you want to be will evolve significantly over time. Remember that companies are huge bodies and there are many factors that influence how happy an engineer is in a place. Google is a great company, but it also has wear and tear.

Since you are starting quite early, there are many ways to get really good training. The first thing I suggest is to ask you to solve as many CS problems as you can. By solving, I mean "find the most efficient way to solve CS questions and code them. Try to make your code run faster and faster. Focus on milliseconds." In the process, you will learn a lot about different fundamentals of computer science. Try participating in open source environments like github and popular coding contests. Try to stay entertained with recent technological developments. Try building mobile apps and web apps in the cloud. You will learn a lot in the process.

Try to do well academically too. Develop a balanced personality. Embrace computer science as your mainstream as you enter your undergraduate / graduate degree and aim to do well there. Trying to get into the best schools can help you get recognized early. If you can't, it's still okay. You can still start at other companies of your liking and then always apply later.

The race is a long and long road, and in time, you can never know where you are going or where you want to go. The best thing you can do is never stop learning and perfecting what you are good at. Be prepared to face failure and don't commit suicide trying to get to a specific location.

I wish you the best.

Intelligence above average for sure!

Joking aside, here's a list of 11 qualities Google looks for in its interns (potential employees), according to a Business Insider article:

  1. Google doesn't look for experts.

"We would rather hire smart and curious people than people who are deep and insightful experts in one area or another."

2. Google wants people with a high "cognitive ability."

"If you hire someone who is bright, curious and who can learn, they are more likely to come up with a new solution that the world has not seen before."

3. Google searches for people with "guts."

A senior executive spoke to the Times

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Intelligence above average for sure!

Joking aside, here's a list of 11 qualities Google looks for in its interns (potential employees), according to a Business Insider article:

  1. Google doesn't look for experts.

"We would rather hire smart and curious people than people who are deep and insightful experts in one area or another."

2. Google wants people with a high "cognitive ability."

"If you hire someone who is bright, curious and who can learn, they are more likely to come up with a new solution that the world has not seen before."

3. Google searches for people with "guts."

A top executive spoke to the Times about a time he was on campus talking to a dual major in computer science and math. The student was thinking of quitting computer science; it was too difficult.

"I told that student that he was much better off being a B student in computer science than an A + student in English,"

4. Google wants to know if candidates can tackle difficult projects.

5. Google wants candidates with analytical skills.

"Analytical training gives you a skill set that sets you apart from most people in the job market."

6. Google expects people to meet ridiculously high standards.

"We don't compromise our hiring bar, ever." Because of this, job postings stay open longer on Google than you'd expect, he says: They have to kiss a lot of frogs before they find The One.

7. But Google doesn't care about GPAs.

GPAs and test scores do not correlate with success in the company.

8. Google wants to know how much candidates have achieved compared to their peers.

For example, many people would simply write, "I wrote editorials for The New York Times." But a featured resume could be more specific about your accomplishments and how you stack up against others. A better example: "50 opinion pieces were published compared to the average of 6 for most opinion piece writers as a result of providing deep insight into the next area over three years."

9. Google looks for employees who know when to step up and take a leadership role.

"What matters to us is, when we are faced with a problem and you are a member of a team, at the right time, do you step in and lead? And equally critically, step back and stop leading, leave someone More? Because the key to being an effective leader in this environment is that you have to be willing to give up power. "

10. Google wants to see people take ownership of projects.

With that sense of ownership, you will feel responsible for the fate of a project, preparing you to solve any problem. But it should also differ when other people have better ideas: "Your ultimate goal is what we can do together to solve the problem. I have contributed my piece and then take a step back."

11. Google also wants to see humility.

You need "intellectual humility" to be successful on Google. "Without humility, you cannot learn." This is a common problem among well-educated people; Graduates of elite business schools tend to stabilize. Instead of having the opportunity to learn, they blame others.

Getting a job at Google tends to be more difficult than working there, and there are two very good reasons for that.

  1. False negatives: Big tech companies (including Google) are much more willing to accept false negatives (not hiring good employees) than false positives (hiring bad employees), so that's one of the reasons it's really difficult Enterokay. Don't get hired though, that doesn't mean you're not good enough, just try again in a couple of months.
  2. Google's "Hire Slow, Shoot Slow" Mindset: It's pretty hard to get a job at Google (especially if you don't know how to
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Getting a job at Google tends to be more difficult than working there, and there are two very good reasons for that.

  1. False negatives: Big tech companies (including Google) are much more willing to accept false negatives (not hiring good employees) than false positives (hiring bad employees), so that's one of the reasons it's really difficult Enterokay. Don't get hired though, that doesn't mean you're not good enough, just try again in a couple of months.
  2. Google's “hire slow, shoot slow” mentality: It's pretty hard to get a job at Google (especially if you don't know how to prepare), but relatively easy to stick with. This allows employees to take risks without worrying about job safety, which keeps Google innovative and creative.

However, even if it is more difficult to get a job at Google, it is certainly not impossible.

To do so, you must first confirm that you meet the minimum qualifications for the position you are interested in; after all, you won't be able to apply if you don't. Note that the position will also include your preferred qualifications, which should go a long way toward helping you get the job if you do.

In the case of a software engineering position, those would be the following:

# 1 MINIMUM RATINGS (SWE, GOOGLE POSITION)

  • Bachelor's degree or equivalent practical experience
  • 3 years of experience in software development or 1 year with an advanced degree
  • Experience in Java, C / C ++, C #, Objective C, Python, JavaScript or Go
  • Experience in web / mobile application development, Unix / Linux environments, distributed / parallel systems, information retrieval, networking or security systems / software development.

# 2 PREFERRED RATINGS (SWE, GOOGLE POSITION)

  • Master, Ph.D. degree, higher education, or experience in engineering, computer science, or other related technical fields
  • Experience developing accessible technologies
  • Interest and ability to learn other coding languages ​​as needed
  • Ability to write in English fluently and idiomatically.
  • Ability to learn other coding languages ​​as needed

Once the minimum qualifications are met (and the preferred qualifications too, hopefully), applying for a SWE position on Google should be pretty easy; To perform well in the interview, you will need to study three topics: data structures and algorithms, systems design, and soft skills like leadership and communication.

# 3 DATA STRUCTURES AND ALGORITHMS

Having a solid understanding of this topic is crucial, because otherwise you won't be able to answer programming questions. For the most important concepts to know about the topic, study search algorithms, shortest path algorithms, dynamic programming, BFS, DFS, arrays, classification algorithms, and binary search trees.

Although this is not the easiest topic to tackle, you definitely have a lot of resources that you can use to study it. Two that come to mind are Introduction to Algorithms (CLRS), an extremely detailed and well-known book of data structures and algorithms that should be treated as an encyclopedia of algorithms, and Edabit, a free-to-use collection of little programming challenges. in 8 different languages ​​with over 10,000 encoding problems to choose from.

# 4 SYSTEM DESIGN

Systems design is a subject that varies in priority by company, but answering design-related questions generally leads to better salaries and jobs down the road. Some of the concepts you can expect to be asked questions about are database fragmentation, redundancy and replication, CDNs, caching, and load balancing.

Like DS&A, there are many resources you can use to study this topic; For example, Tech Interview Pro, an interview prep program designed by a former Google and Facebook SWE that has two detailed modules on systems design, and then you can use Cracking The Coding Interview, a classic interview prep book that You have company-specific design-related questions to answer.

# 5 SOFT SKILLS

This aspect is often ignored by other candidates because they do not see how non-technical skills could have something to do with a technical interview, but it is very important to be able to adequately express the ideas that come to you during the coding of the board and that you demonstrate. that you can work with a team once you get the job.

However, soft skills are an easy topic to prepare for. One resource you could use is Pramp, a site that allows you to participate in mock interviews with other software engineers (some of whom have worked at Google and Facebook before) while receiving immediate, objective feedback on their performance.

Good luck with your interviews.

  1. Get good grades in high school. Study all the math you can and any computer science courses your school offers. If you can learn from books and the Internet, start studying basic algorithms and data structures; there are many good resources available.
  2. Go to the best university you can. If you have the opportunity to attend one of the top 25 colleges, don't worry about the cost - you'll earn enough to pay off your loans quickly.
  3. Study Computer Science. Take all the safety courses your school offers. Get good grades. If your school has one, join the Capture The Flag (CTF) team; if not, start one.
  4. Then
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  1. Get good grades in high school. Study all the math you can and any computer science courses your school offers. If you can learn from books and the Internet, start studying basic algorithms and data structures; there are many good resources available.
  2. Go to the best university you can. If you have the opportunity to attend one of the top 25 colleges, don't worry about the cost - you'll earn enough to pay off your loans quickly.
  3. Study Computer Science. Take all the safety courses your school offers. Get good grades. If your school has one, join the Capture The Flag (CTF) team; if not, start one.
  4. Second year, apply for internships with all the big tech companies and security companies. It will be difficult to get a second year, but you have nothing to lose. If you can't get one, a general IT or developer job is second best. Please try again in the third year.
  5. Last year, apply to work at Google as a security engineer! You can also apply as a security software engineer.

I encourage you not to get obsessed with Google. It's a great company with a great security team, but there are plenty of others, like Microsoft and Facebook. I also highly recommend that you get a broad computer science education so that you are qualified for a wide range of jobs.

Zero.

Many people join Google directly after college. Some of them may have open source experience or internships at other companies, but even this is not necessary. You will join at a lower level, usually L3, or maybe L4 if you have a PhD, and then you will get the skills and experience you need during your time at Google.

You'll still need something to attract recruiters, and you'll have to do well enough in interviews, but none of that necessarily requires real industry programming experience.

I joined Google in 2018, with my only real programming experience before then.

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Zero.

Many people join Google directly after college. Some of them may have open source experience or internships at other companies, but even this is not necessary. You will join at a lower level, usually L3, or maybe L4 if you have a PhD, and then you will get the skills and experience you need during your time at Google.

You'll still need something to attract recruiters, and you'll have to do well enough in interviews, but none of that necessarily requires real industry programming experience.

I joined Google in 2018, and my only real programming experience before that point was an internship at Google in 2017, which I converted to a full-time position. I don't have any open source contributions, I'm not from top-tier university, I didn't have good grades, I didn't have personal projects. I got the attention of recruiters by doing relatively well in coding contests. After starting in 2018 on L3, I am currently L4, and not that I have much experience at the moment.

You are too young to think about becoming a CEO. I am not obstructing your goal, but I advise you to really ask yourself this question in a different sense like, how can you help the world using technology, what are the challenges of the future, and how are technology and computers going to solve these challenges? a product and you will definitely become the CEO of your own company that makes your invention and your company may be able to unseat Google.

In short, your goal should not be to become CEO, but as CEO, what difference can you make to this humanity.

If this answer still does not convince me, I am going

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You are too young to think about becoming a CEO. I am not obstructing your goal, but I advise you to really ask yourself this question in a different sense like, how can you help the world using technology, what are the challenges of the future, and how are technology and computers going to solve these challenges? a product and you will definitely become the CEO of your own company that makes your invention and your company may be able to unseat Google.

In short, your goal should not be to become CEO, but as CEO, what difference can you make to this humanity.

If you're still not convinced with this answer, I'll give you a shortcut. Try to do it in a year and at your own risk. Hack Google's website and display a message “You need a different level of talent, why don't you give me a try? ”. If things don't get ugly, you will be a celebrity followed by a Google employee and you may be the next CEO at 35 (using a certain probability). If things get ugly, you may not end up in jail due to juvenile laws, but you may face some punishment.

Well, to start with, what would you like to work on at Google?

The first step in achieving this goal is identifying the career path you want to pursue. Do you want to work as a computer engineer? A CEO? A human resources specialist? There are numerous roles you can play at Google, and in order for you to get there successfully, you will need to focus on your career niche.

This means getting the right training, education, qualifications, and experience that could help you stand out from the sea of ​​applicants who also dream of working at Google.

Internships are also a great step that could help you achieve

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Well, to start with, what would you like to work on at Google?

The first step in achieving this goal is identifying the career path you want to pursue. Do you want to work as a computer engineer? A CEO? A human resources specialist? There are numerous roles you can play at Google, and in order for you to get there successfully, you will need to focus on your career niche.

This means getting the right training, education, qualifications, and experience that could help you stand out from the sea of ​​applicants who also dream of working at Google.

Internships are also a great step that could help you achieve your goal. Google has several offices, all of which will likely recruit interns annually.

Explore the Google website and see what opportunities may be available to you. Internships are not only great for getting familiar with the company, but also for making professional connections that could be very helpful in the future.

You may also have the opportunity to speak with recruiters at Google-hosted career fairs or events, so keep an eye out for these.

Generally speaking, regardless of the company you want to work for, the procedure is generally the same. My advice, then, is to focus on the career you want to pursue, take the time to hone your skills and hone your craft, and the rest should follow!

Hiring people under the age of 18 is a huge hassle for all human resources departments, with a lot of additional paperwork, school permits, and child labor laws. Most large companies won't bother with it except in the most extraordinary circumstances.

In those cases, they will find you and not the other way around.

PROTIP: When looking for a job, the first thing to ask yourself is, "What do I bring to the table that gives me an edge over everyone else who wants this job?" If your motivation is "gain experience and other reasons," that's a ticket to the end of the line.

Hello there,

Thank you for asking me for an answer.

There are no age limits to work with Microsoft or Google, if you have the necessary skills, you can definitely apply for the company. You should have a good experience if you really want to work with these companies.

I have never worked with any of these companies, but I heard about the culture, it is very fun and interesting to work with Google.

Anyway, you can always try Google and Microsoft.

All the best for your future.

Thanks

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