What is the minimum age to do a job in Canada?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Joseph Wright



What is the minimum age to do a job in Canada?

As far as I know, the minimum age to work in Canada is 14 and it depends on the job and the province. Generally, you have to be

14 to work in a store or as a waiter

15 in a restaurant kitchen

16 to work on a construction project

18 to work selling or serving alcohol

When you are under 18 and have not yet graduated from high school, the law says you must be in school. Therefore, you are not allowed to work during school hours during school days.

Canadian children start working between the ages of 13 and 14 because most live from hand to mouth. Single mother and divorce is the common factor for child labor. Western countries will speak out about other countries for child labor while ignoring the problems in their countries.

Here are 10 unique things you can do to find a job in Canada that other new immigrants to Canada don't, because there is no one to teach these things:

# 1 Record an elevator presentation video on your mobile phone

As a new immigrant, employers will have an unconscious bias against your communication skills, which is a soft skill that you will find a requirement in almost every job description.

If you have a video presentation, your vocabulary and communication skills will be exposed, and any biases or negative assumptions that the employer or recruiter may have made about you will be removed.

if you have

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Here are 10 unique things you can do to find a job in Canada that other new immigrants to Canada don't, because there is no one to teach these things:

# 1 Record an elevator presentation video on your mobile phone

As a new immigrant, employers will have an unconscious bias against your communication skills, which is a soft skill that you will find a requirement in almost every job description.

If you have a video presentation, your vocabulary and communication skills will be exposed, and any biases or negative assumptions that the employer or recruiter may have made about you will be removed.

If you have trouble memorizing words, use a teleprompter app like Video Teleprompter Premium.

Create a great 30-45 second elevator pitch, upload it to YouTube, and add it to your LinkedIn profile. Link it from your emails to hiring managers and recruiters as well.

Research how to make good elevator pitches. Don't assume you know how.

# 2 Anglicate / shorten your name

This is a sensitive topic, but it is also worth mentioning. The University of Toronto and Ryerson University conducted a study that found that job applicants with non-Anglo names received between 20 and 40 percent fewer callbacks, compared to their Anglo-Saxon counterparts with exactly the same names. ratings.

This is less of a problem in large corporate organizations in Canada, where diversity and inclusion are more actively practiced.

If you have an ethnic name that is very long and you think it will be a challenge for a Canadian to pronounce it, consider shortening it for your resume and LinkedIn profile.

# 3 Grow your network to 25

As a new immigrant, you don't have a great network. And that is a problem.

Because according to the Business Council of Canada that surveyed 90 Canadian employers from a large industry, 90% of them get candidates from referrals.

According to author Orville Pierson in his book "Highly Effective Job Search," it takes, on average, 25 network connections to get the job you want.

These 25 people are not recruiters. They are people who have the power and authority to hire you.

So, make a list of 10-15 companies you want to target in Canada and use a filtered LinkedIn search by company and title, and the premium account to send InMail messages to these people directly.

Don't ask for work.

Just keep in touch and offer them value. If they accept your connection request, you don't need to sacrifice an InMail credit.

If they respond to your InMail, you get your credit back.

Think of the popular marketing concept of "The Rule of 7." Someone needs to see an ad 7 times before considering buying your brand.

If you must measure the progress of your job search, other than the number of jobs you apply for online every day. Let it try to send extension 175 (25x7) messages to your network for a reasonable period of time.

The messages "Hello" and "I hope you are doing well" do not count. It should be something that is of value to the recipient.

# 4 Write cover letters the right way

Recruiters and managers will tell you that they ignore reading cover letters.

That's because everyone tends to suck writing cover letters.

According to job search expert Liz Ryan from Human Workplace, a cover letter should be read like a business pain letter.

The focus should be on the business problem that you think your future manager is feeling right now and how you have solved that problem in the past.

Every job exists because there is a pain or a problem that needs to be solved.

Do your research on the best way to write cover letters rather than assuming you know how.

# 5 Post your resume and cover letter directly to hiring managers

The postal service is alive and well in Canada and is often underestimated.

The benefit of using it is that, unlike email, your letters will never be ignored.

Head over to Shopper's Drug Mart and invest in stamps and envelopes.

So those 25 contacts you discovered? Send them your resume and cover letter.

That's the easy part.

If you want to make a good impression, you should take the time to research the company and the person and create a personalized cover letter for each of them.

I know it takes a lot of effort. Well, how much do you want that first job in Canada?

# 6 Read this book "20 Minute Networking Meeting" by Nathan Perez

Many immigrants do not have a network in Canada.

But they make so many mistakes trying to build that network, even though they've been building a network their entire lives in their home country.

And the reason is that they have never been connected with a purpose.

This short book gives you the details on how to network with a purpose and achieve the ultimate goal of meeting professional Canadians in person.

# 7 Find Dr. Lionel Laroche on YouTube

You need to understand how the Canadian work culture differs from that of your home country.

Communication, leadership, feedback, meetings, punctuality are just some of the areas in which Canada is different from the rest of the world, especially compared to Asia and the Middle East.

Dr. Lionel Laroche specializes in Canadian work culture and how it relates to immigrants.

Watch your videos and reflect on how it relates to how you present yourself in the interview.

His talks are enlightening and entertaining.

# 8 Get Canadian experience the RIGHT way

Many will tell you to volunteer your time.

That is the wrong advice!

If you're looking for a job in accounting, hiring managers won't mind that you've gained "volunteer experience" packing food with meals on wheels or greeting visitors and handing out flyers at some random organization.

If you want to volunteer to give back to the community, good for you. Give your time generously anywhere.

But if landing a full-time job is your agenda, that's a completely different story.

It is best if you volunteer your time at events where you are surrounded by people who have the power and authority to hire you. Join an association in your field in Canada and communicate directly with the board of directors and be available to volunteer.

Yes, it is an investment to join an association. But if you finish your job search sooner or land you a job that pays you $ 10,000 more per year, it's worth the investment.

# 9 Read as many job descriptions for your target job title as you can

By default, every new immigrant I have worked with makes the mistake of depositing their past experiences on their resume.

Remember that it is not about what you did in the past.

It's about what your future employer needs and how you translate your past experience into those needs.

Read the job descriptions for your target job title. As many as you can. And when you're done, read a little more.

Look at trends in qualifications and requirements, industry language in Canadian terms, and any gaps you find.

Make sure your resume responds to those trends.

Fill in those gaps if you have them.

And after doing this research, decide if you need more education. Don't waste your time and money looking for more education just because you want to keep busy and feel productive.

Education is not valued as much in North America as it is in Asia.

If the job description doesn't mention a master's degree or certification for your target job title, don't bother getting one if your sole purpose is to improve your chances of landing your first job.

# 10 Make sure your resume has these words

According to a study by Career Builder, these are the most popular words to use on a resume. Make sure to use them in your experience section:

  1. Accomplished
  2. Improved
  3. Trained / Mentioned
  4. Administered
  5. Created
  6. Resolved
  7. Voluntary
  8. Influenced
  9. Increased decreased
  10. Ideas

Click here to download a high-converting Canadian resume template

Good luck and welcome to Canada!

You don't necessarily need a job offer to immigrate to Canada, in fact there are a number of ways you can do it.

Canada is one of the preferred countries for immigrants to settle, since the quality of education and the standard of living are suitable for a healthy and well-maintained lifestyle. Canada is considered to be the perfect combination of open-minded and tolerant people who are open to all cultures and opinions a person may have. Furthermore, it should not be forgotten that the amount of economic opportunities that a country offers its citizens is simply untouchable.

You don't need to have a free job

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You don't necessarily need a job offer to immigrate to Canada, in fact there are a number of ways you can do it.

Canada is one of the preferred countries for immigrants to settle, since the quality of education and the standard of living are suitable for a healthy and well-maintained lifestyle. Canada is considered to be the perfect combination of open-minded and tolerant people who are open to all cultures and opinions a person may have. Furthermore, it should not be forgotten that the amount of economic opportunities that a country offers its citizens is simply untouchable.

It is not necessary that you have a job offer in the country to immigrate to this beautiful nation since there are different types of documents, visas and purposes that can be used. These are some of the legal and ethical ways you can really open the doors of opportunity for us in Canada. Let's take a look at them one by one.

1. Educational programs

- With a great reputation in the fields of educational institutes and student welfare, Canada is one of the favorite destinations for many students for their higher studies. Due to the exceptional quality of education at universities and the easily available international scholarships, Canada is considered to be the "center of diverse education". Every year a large number of students from all over the world land in Canada for educational purposes and do not require any type of job offer for this.

Canada also promotes higher education for students and that is why almost all universities have a specific international scholarship especially focused on international students and their convenience as not all students need to be able to afford it. There are some universities that even offer fully funded scholarship programs for some of the brightest academic gems. So if you are good at any kind of subject, you can take advantage of scholarships after passing some tests like IELTS, TOEFL, and other college scholarship entrance exams.

It is quite obvious that students who come to Canada to study then find work in the same country and take a step towards becoming a PR. There are many immigrants who have been living peaceful and prosperous lives in Canada. You must be eligible for higher education according to the requirements of the university you are applying to. Keep in mind that it is not easy to afford a great educational package as there could be differences in currency conversions.

So if you have a decent amount to spend and want to immigrate to Canada, this may be a great option for you.

2. The express entry system

- This is another system that allows a candidate to apply for immigration to Canada. Skilled workforce is the backbone of any economy and that is why Canada has always welcomed such people with open arms. To apply for this system, you must first make sure that you are eligible and pass the criteria that are necessary.

To apply for a quick entry system, you can create an online profile and update all your necessary documents, qualifications, work experience, etc. Once you have done so, a CRS (Comprehensive Ranking System) score will be generated based on the information you have provided. After obtaining your score, you will be compared to various profiles who have also applied for the same and based on that comparison, you will be allowed immigration.

There are 3 important programs that are included in the express entry system that you can apply for:

  • Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP): If you are a person with skills in managerial work and other professional jobs and you want to pursue a career in that field, this is the program to follow. You must have a minimum of 12 months of experience in the particular skill and must be certified to work in that position.
  • Federal Business Skills Program (FSTP) - This program deals with people who work in the field of exchanges, currency exchange, stock markets and have a good command of finance and trade. If you want to migrate to Canada, you can easily apply in this quick entry section and if your CRS score compares to the competition.
  • Canada Experience Class - As the name suggests, if you have extensive experience in a particular field and have accomplished a lot in your territory, Canada is a great place for you as there are many new opportunities available. If you want to apply to the experience class of both programs mentioned above, you must have a minimum of 2 years of experience in business or managerial positions.

3. The province's nomination program

- Each province of Canada must ensure that it has an adequate number of skilled labor, workers and professionals to keep its state away from any kind of shortage. There are some specific areas of industries that require a large number of workers, especially for some fields where there is a severe shortage. There is a particular time when different fields are booming and it becomes the center of attraction for almost all aspiring professionals. Because of this, there comes a time when some professions are left without adequate manpower and therefore, to fill this gap, all the provinces of the country need trained people to handle the vacant jobs.

Understand in this way, IT sector is on a roll right now, with the scope of rapid growth in the industry, everyone wants to be a part of this industry and if everyone moves to this sector, who will tackle another important task like driving? taxis? , working as a labor force? To fill these vacancies, the provinces announce nomination programs to incorporate new workers. You can easily apply or 'nominate' through PNP apps.

Each province may require a different candidate (depending on the shortage they face) however, there are some common categories according to the people selected, these are:

  • In demand categories: these are the requirements that a province faces when it is affected by a shortage in any particular field. Professions can vary according to the requirements of the provinces and can range from driver to cook and from security guard to nurse. You must present an appropriate candidacy according to the job profile you are applying for.
  • Skilled Worker Category - This is somewhat similar to the Quick Income Program, except you have a better chance of bringing it to Canada. You will see that when you apply for an express entry you will be competing with many people from all over the world and when you are applying directly to a province the competing group is shorter which makes your chances even stronger than before and if you have the match. skills, then it is another advantage for you.
  • International Graduate Categories: When you are studying at a particular university of a particular province, you can apply for permanent residence in this category and the province can help you increase your chances of obtaining one, as long as it ensures that you will stay and work in that province. For any particular province in Canada, their prosperity is a top priority and they simply cannot maintain it because they have a shortage of workers.

When applying in any of the above categories, keep in mind that you will be competing in a pool of skilled workers from all over the world, so you must have all the right qualities and you will not need any kind of job offer before you. moving to Canada.

4. Start-up visa

- Yes, you read it right! Canada has been a great country in terms of financial and industrial resources and if you are looking to take advantage of these resources, you can apply for a starter visa. Eligibility for its start-up is that it must add a significant improvement to Canada's economy, as well as open new doors of jobs and innovation in the country. As you may already know, Canada is one of the most desirable countries for career growth, as the work-life balance that you can maintain in this country is very difficult to maintain in any other. You can directly apply for an initiation visa with all the necessary information about your vision and how it can be beneficial to the country of Canada and its people.

It is not at all necessary that you have a start-up, but you should have a work plan that you can present to the commission. You should also be careful that if you have a team that is going to work with you it can be a bit difficult for you. Your goal should be to make a profit and deliver great benefits to the Canadian economy, as well as create new career opportunities for the local population.

5. Family sponsorship

- If you have a family member who lives in Canada, you can help them with their immigration process. Being a citizen of your own nation, they can sponsor you for your immigration. The Government of Canada is very lenient with laws pertaining to the family and has made this visa specifically to ensure that all families are united. There are multiple scenarios that can occur and a person living in Canada may require the presence of a family member. The family member can be a spouse, parents / grandparents, trusted children, etc.

Family sponsorship also has some of the subsections that you must ensure to apply accordingly:

  • Spouse and Family Sponsorship - You may not be able to survive alone in a country you are completely unfamiliar with. If you want to take your family members with you, you can easily apply for this type of visa without it being an immigration problem. Family visa applications are treated with priority, as the Canadian government has a very nice policy of favoring family reunions.
  • Spouse and Domestic Partner Sponsorship: If your spouse has been living in Canada for a while and has obtained permanent resident status, you are entitled to obtain a visa under this section of the immigration rule. Same-sex couples are also considered by the Canadian government. There are some specific requirements given by the IRCC that you must meet, once you have done so your spouse or partner (who has been living in Canada) can sponsor you to get your visa through overseas or domestic sponsorship.
  • Sponsorship of dependent children: If your parents live in Canada, as a child you will be allowed to stay in the country for as long as you can complete your documentation. You also have the right to become a permanent resident if you and your parents meet all the necessary IRCC requirements.
  • Parent and Grandparent Sponsorship: This program can help parents and grandparents of a Canadian resident move in with their children. If you are a Canadian citizen, you can sponsor your parents and grandparents to enter the country without any job offer or anything else.

Canada is a very citizen friendly country with an absolutely charming way of life. There are many ways to guarantee immigration without having an offer letter in hand. You can also consult many different agents to understand more about these forms of immigration; however, finding a genuine and helpful agent who is not after your money and really wants to help is like finding a needle in a pile of hay. So be careful who you choose.

I hope this answer helps you with your future endeavors!

Also, in case you still have doubts, this video should be of help to you and will answer all your questions for sure!

Good luck!

I think Canada is extremely depopulated. It is the second largest country on Earth and yet it has only 38 million inhabitants compared to 330 million in the US Canada could easily support 100 million people.

My own home province of Alberta (population 4.4 million) could support as many people as France (67 million), given its vast areas of fertile farmland that are not much different from France or Ukraine (42 million). Saskatchewan has even more farmland than Alberta and only 1 million people can eat all the food it can produce.

Toronto is already the third largest c

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I think Canada is extremely depopulated. It is the second largest country on Earth and yet it has only 38 million inhabitants compared to 330 million in the US Canada could easily support 100 million people.

My own home province of Alberta (population 4.4 million) could support as many people as France (67 million), given its vast areas of fertile farmland that are not much different from France or Ukraine (42 million). Saskatchewan has even more farmland than Alberta and only 1 million people can eat all the food it can produce.

Toronto is already the third largest city in North America after New York and Los Angeles, having moved on to Chicago, and it is still growing, unlike those other cities. However, I think it is probably best to spread the population a bit more to prevent it from becoming the largest city on the continent (unless it includes Mexico City). Vancouver has a shortage of flat land to develop, so putting it there is not enough. a good idea, but there are many other cities with a lot of land around it in Canada.

Calgary has been growing like Topsy since I was born. It has been one of the fastest growing cities in North America, and it is now ten times bigger than it was then, but it still has plenty of room to grow. Edmonton is the same. By the end of the century, they could both have as many people as Toronto does now, with no real constraints on their growth.

The proposed immigration totals are not that unreasonable as they are only about 1% a year. I think we can absorb so many immigrants given the fact that Canadians are relatively color blind and our educational system is pretty good at taking the children of immigrants and cananizing them.

We came from Dubai / Sharjah, so abroad was not a new concept for us. We were already expatriates for 9 years before landing in Canada. The only mistake we made was that I had my husband sponsor me and we landed with the whole family without a runway or without meeting a soul in Canada plus 2 small children in hand, but we made it. The initial fight would have been very scary and difficult if we had not bought 100k USD. We didn't have a suitable job for almost a year and spending $ 3000pm and more was painful. We buy our own apartment with a down payment of 40% with 15-20 days of landing because it is almost impossible to get it.

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We came from Dubai / Sharjah, so abroad was not a new concept for us. We were already expatriates for 9 years before landing in Canada. The only mistake we made was that I had my husband sponsor me and we landed with the whole family without a runway or without meeting a soul in Canada plus 2 small children in hand, but we made it. The initial fight would have been very scary and difficult if we had not bought 100k USD. We didn't have a suitable job for almost a year and spending $ 3000pm and more was painful. We bought our own apartment with a 40% down payment with 15-20 days of landing because it is almost impossible to get a rental without work, credit history and owner history. Since we bought 3 bedrooms with 2 baths and it was recession when we landed in 2009, There weren't many jobs available, but then Canada doesn't make anything and everything is imported from the United States and Mexico. Not even menial jobs without networking, but after 10 months my husband started a cooperative and got a $ 17 an hour break from work. Until then, we kept 2 tenants in 2 bedrooms for $ 1000 per night, as both rooms were enough to pay for maintenance plus mortgage every month. Our food expenses were $ 500 for the afternoon, so we were relieved to have reduced our costs at least. We were determined not to give up easily and even Dubai was in recession, but my husband could have got his job back if he wanted to, but we never knew, we could have gone back for 2 years and back after 2 years. we have to stay 1095 days in 5 years to obtain citizenship. We completed 3 years and by then my husband was earning $ 22 per hour working 60-70 hours per week and we bought another freestanding house the second year for 370k and rented 3 basement rooms to 3 different tenants for $ 1500pm so our mortgage it was paid for by the basement tenants. We pay between $ 500 and 700 p. M. For utilities and food expenses, in addition to repairs, if any. Searching for each and every one without anyone's help was the hardest part and that too with 2 toddlers in -25 degrees. In 5-7 years, I bought 5 properties and got 2 more properties as a property manager, so I started earning twice as much as my husband with 22 tenants. After 5 years, my husband had a good 100k break and worked 4 days a week. He also helped me with the maintenance of the property, otherwise it would be very difficult with 2 young children. Now after 8 years, we start selling a property for double the price every year due to 35% capital gains tax. We now have 2 owned properties and 2 properties as property manager plus 12 tenants. In 9 years, 2 tenants brought us to LTB and we evicted them through a paralegal. I learned a difficult lesson in selecting tenants carefully because some get intoxicated after 7pm and disrupt the neighborhood. The rental property business is good, but everyone threatens the landlord with court if he wants to sell the properties because LTB supports tenants in Canada. Due to the brutal cold weather, being isolated indoors for 7-8 months is not my cup of tea, so I plan on moving to Vancouver next year. We're sorry we didn't land in Vancouver in 2009, but that's okay. We were successful and plan to purchase a shopping plaza next year after settling in Vancouver. I will update more when I have time.

I emigrated at 36 years old with a pregnant wife (20 weeks), with only 16 thousand dollars in my pocket, without a job offer and without knowing anything about what awaited us.

It was 2013. And I was lucky, I was able to find a job in 4 weeks, as a software developer.

But as it turned out, they hired me very, very, very cheap compared to what they were willing to pay Canadians. It was fine in 2013, because rents were much cheaper than now in 2019, and there were far fewer immigrants at the time (less competition), and I was working in IT.

So if you have a very good IT experience and

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I emigrated at 36 years old with a pregnant wife (20 weeks), with only 16 thousand dollars in my pocket, without a job offer and without knowing anything about what awaited us.

It was 2013. And I was lucky, I was able to find a job in 4 weeks, as a software developer.

But as it turned out, they hired me very, very, very cheap compared to what they were willing to pay Canadians. It was fine in 2013, because rents were much cheaper than now in 2019, and there were far fewer immigrants at the time (less competition), and I was working in IT.

So if you have a very good IT background and don't ask for much at first, you can find a job. But don't expect it to be very good.

If it's not IT, it's hard to say if you can find something fast enough. Doctors (they basically need to graduate from college again), lawyers, construction workers - don't expect it to be easy, prepare for survival jobs (taxi drivers, tellers, call centers).

Also, rents are higher these days (we rented a one-bedroom apartment in Etobicoke for $ 1250 in 2013, I specifically looked at their website today, the exact same room in the same building costs $ 1850). Taxes are higher, the cost of living is higher, and there are many more newcomers from around the world who will work for lower wages.

Therefore, it may not be as easy as 6 years ago.

But, also note that the question "is it okay to move ... without a job offer" is not applicable at all? I doubt that I can find a job without landing in Canada in the first place. No one will give you an offer unless you are in Canada - you simply have to go for face-to-face interviews before receiving an offer. You will also need to get a SIN (social security number), find a place to live, open a bank account, etc., it can take time, no one will wait for you.

The only way to have an advance job offer is for your current employer to transfer you to their Canadian office. I have several friends who came like this. It was much easier and less stressful.

Work after study in Canada

An important aspect of deciding on a study abroad destination is the job opportunities available upon completion of the course. Higher education along with living expenses is quite expensive and post-course job opportunities become an important deciding factor in choosing the country to study abroad. The availability of jobs after the completion of the course is also an important factor in the candidate's choice of particular specializations.

The country's policy to offer job opportunities to its international students is often one of the most important.

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Work after study in Canada

An important aspect of deciding on a study abroad destination is the job opportunities available upon completion of the course. Higher education along with living expenses is quite expensive and post-course job opportunities become an important deciding factor in choosing the country to study abroad. The availability of jobs after the completion of the course is also an important factor in the candidate's choice of particular specializations.

The country's policy of offering job opportunities to its international students is often one of the most important reasons for a student to choose it to pursue a higher education. Supportive work policies benefit the student as it is not economically feasible to return to the home country after obtaining an expensive educational qualification. Job opportunities after studying in Canada is one of the important reasons for choosing higher education. Canadian work policies for international students after completing their courses are friendly as they offer opportunities to students once they complete their courses.

Canada is one of the most popular study abroad destinations with some of the best universities in the world. Along with this, Canada's top universities are also among the top destinations for Natural Sciences, Arts and Humanities, Social Sciences and Management, and Life Sciences and Medicine. Canada has earned a lot of goodwill among international students for its post-study student work visa regulations.

With the ease of access to various work-after-study opportunities in Canada, it is no wonder why the country is an increasingly popular destination for international students.

Gateway to Jobs in Canada: A Graduate Work Permit

The Graduate Work Permit Program (PGWPP) allows international students who have completed an educational degree from a participating Canadian post-secondary institution to work after studying in Canada. International students who gain qualified Canadian work experience may also qualify to apply for Permanent Residence (PR) through the Canadian experience class.

The PGWPP is beneficial for candidates who want more time to search for suitable employment and is also the first step for candidates who wish to finally acquire Canadian citizenship. This is because if a candidate has sufficient skills and the required work experience, they can become a citizen of Canada under the Express Entry scheme.

Duration of postgraduate work permit

The PGWPP allows the candidate to work for a period equal to the length of the study program the candidate has completed in Canada. The maximum duration of the work permit under the PGWPP is three years. This means that the work permit is not offered for a period longer than the duration of the study program completed by a candidate. The minimum duration of work after studying in Canada offered under the PGWPP is eight months. Candidates taking courses in Canada that are less than 8 months in duration are not eligible. Also, whether a candidate is pursuing a three-year course or a four-year course, the work permit offered under the PGWPP will be only three years.

Work After Studying in Canada - Eligibility Criteria

To be eligible for a permit to work after studying in Canada, the candidate must meet certain preconditions. The main criterion that makes a candidate eligible for the work permit is a minimum duration of study of eight months at a designated learning institution in Canada. In addition, the candidate must also meet the following criteria:

The candidate must:

  • be at least 18 years old at the time of application
  • have followed a full-time study program in Canada (for at least eight months)
  • You must have graduated from a public postsecondary school, such as a trade or technical school, university, or college. The private high school or postsecondary school must offer programs of 900 hours or more for the professional diploma or it must be a private Canadian institution that can legally grant degrees.
  • apply for PGWP within 90 days of completion of the educational program
  • have a valid study permit when applying for PGWP

The PGWP is not offered to candidates who have studied in Canada for more than eight months but have done so intermittently. Candidates who have taken semester vacations during their course are also not eligible to work after studying in Canada. Furthermore, candidates who already hold a work permit associated with any other study program are also not eligible.

Transition from graduation to employment

Off-Campus Work Permit - Candidates are not required to surrender off-campus permission to apply for the Graduate Work Permit Program and can take up full-time or part-time employment, as long as the candidate has a Canadian student visa valid. .

Without an off-campus work permit: If candidates plan to explore work opportunities after studying in Canada and aspire to work off-campus but do not have a work permit, the candidate must apply for the same before his or her expiration. student visa. Once the candidate obtains the PGWP, they can accept any type of employment in Canada.

For all this, Canada has become one of the most suitable destinations for higher education.

I would also like to make a cheeky connection to my company Leap Scholar Study in Canada for Indian Students, where you can learn more about job opportunities in Canada by contacting our expert advisors and student mentors.

Good luck!

Some do.

For example: My Philippine RN, GF, was a RN in the Philippines and Nursing Director / Clinical Trainer for years in Singapore.

When she came to Canada on the live babysitting program, she worked for 2 years as a babysitter and house cleaner.

Her registered nurse status was not recognized. This was due to a change in Canadian rules. Her much less experienced sister was admitted a year earlier and was recognized as a registered nurse just before the rules changed.

After the paperwork and more years of talking and paying thousands of dollars to the government, they finally recognized her as just RPN.

Less pay and again, no wha

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Some do.

For example: My Philippine RN, GF, was a RN in the Philippines and Nursing Director / Clinical Trainer for years in Singapore.

When she came to Canada on the live babysitting program, she worked for 2 years as a babysitter and house cleaner.

Her registered nurse status was not recognized. This was due to a change in Canadian rules. Her much less experienced sister was admitted a year earlier and was recognized as a registered nurse just before the rules changed.

After the paperwork and more years of talking and paying thousands of dollars to the government, they finally recognized her as just RPN.

Less paid, and again not what you worked for for years in Singapore. Singapore has the same standards of care as Canada.

They told her to get recognized as an RN she would need to take Candian university courses. She paid 1000s more and is about half way done with that.

This is a person that works an average of 120 hours in 2 weeks and does not complain but should have earned 100'000s more.

Essentially Canadian policies made a highly experienced professional work as a nanny getting much less then half what she should each year.

Now it's been 5 years and they are talking about allowing new immigrants to get direct RN again. lt does not apply to those already here. No appeal is allowed for her.

The main reason for the policy (according to government officials)towards the Philippines is that until recently they had only grade 10 and Canada has 12. This was not seen as equivalent. They should however take into account actual work experience logically at a higher weight and they keep waffling.

I told her she should have stayed in Singapore as their dollar is near parity with ours now and she allready had the job. Filipinas though like to be around their family and they happened to allready be in Canada.

You chose to tag this question with ‘immigration to Canada’, so I am assuming you are living outside Canada. Therefore, your first question is whether you can immigrate to Canada. Then you can worry about a job.

Anyone thinking of immigrating to Canada at age 50 or older is not likely to be accepted. Canada has a points-based immigration system that carries great weight in approving younger applicants.

By completing the Immigration Canada questionnaire on this page, you will find out how many points you are likely to earn as a potential immigrant to Canada. This is not an application, it is only for you

Keep reading

You chose to label this question 'immigration to Canada', so I'm assuming you live outside of Canada. Therefore, your first question is whether you can immigrate to Canada. Then you can worry about a job.

Anyone thinking of immigrating to Canada at age 50 or older is not likely to be accepted. Canada has a points-based immigration system that carries great weight in approving younger applicants.

If you complete the questionnaire from Immigration Canada on this page, you’ll find out how many points you are likely to score as potential immigrant to Canada. This is not an application - it is just for your information. Those invited to come to Canada are currently scoring 460–470 points.

Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) tool: skilled immigrants (Express Entry)

It is almost impossible for older applicants to score enough points. It is also designed to be that way. Canada is seeking to import younger workers, not people nearing retirement age.

Also, as others have pointed out, it is VERY difficult to get hired in Canada once you are an older worker. Employers don’t want to take a chance.

If you are applying from outside Canada, it will be impossible. Employers in Canada cannot hire foreign workers without first proving that no current Canadian resident can do the job. Then an employer will have to go through the delay/cost of an LMIA which no employer is at all likely to do for an older employer who is of little perceived value.

Sorry.

Thanks for A2A.

Getting a job in Canada when you're not here is challenging! However if your skill is in great demand here, you'll get it!

  1. Check your skills in National Occupational Classification (NOC) list. This'll give you an idea of you'll get a job at all or not!
  2. Register yourself on Canadian government job bank at Your career starts here here the high demand jobs are listed.
  3. Fill in the form at the JobBank link above very accurately. People really read your app in my experience!
  4. Make your resume in Canadian format. Get to know the companies that interest you and contact them
Keep reading

Thanks for A2A.

Getting a job in Canada when you are not here is a challenge! However, if your skill is in high demand here, you will get it!

  1. Check your skills on the National Occupational Classification (NOC) list. This will give you an idea of ​​whether or not you will get a job!
  2. Register with the Canadian government job board at Your career starts here. High demand jobs are listed here.
  3. Fill in the form at the JobBank link above very accurately. People really read your app in my experience!
  4. Make your resume in Canadian format. Learn about the companies you are interested in and contact them via LinkedIn or submit a request directly to their site.
  5. Finally, join a company in your country that has a branch in Canada and transfer.

I hope this helps!

I had the same question myself before emigrating. I tried hard for that too. Here is my opinion. The easiest thing would be to get a work permit from a company that you have here. That would help in immigration later on, as we get extra points for that. I applied for more than 50 companies from India. I received 2 responses. I had attended 2 Skype interviews, but the response was "get in touch once we land, if there is openness, you may consider"

In order for someone to get a job from outside, companies must show that such a job description cannot be completed by local hiring and only someone

Keep reading

I had the same question myself before emigrating. I tried hard for that too. Here is my opinion. The easiest thing would be to get a work permit from a company that you have here. That would help in immigration later on, as we get extra points for that. I applied for more than 50 companies from India. I received 2 responses. I had attended 2 Skype interviews, but the response was "get in touch once we land, if there is openness, you may consider"

For someone to get a job from outside, the companies need to prove that such a job description could not be filled by local hiring and only someone with your expertise on skill set X can do that. Thats a whole tedious process that no company wishes to go through.

Here, most recruitment is via Agency/Consultancy/Friend referrals and all of them requires your presence in person for a face to face. With so much fraud activity happening in terms of fake interviews, fake candidates, proxy attending interviews for another, the credibility of the candidate comes under scrutiny for most cases.

I am not saying its impossible to get a job offer from India, but just that the chances are less and your resume must stand out for getting such an opportunity.

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