What is the hardest thing you have ever worked on in your entire life?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Fletcher Harrison



What is the hardest thing you have ever worked on in your entire life?

In 2000, I was the second-level manager (that is, the Director) leading eBay's White Box QA team. In case you were wondering, White Box QA engineers are just programmers developing test software rather than Black Box testers running and reporting test results. Anyway, it had 60 employees with about 20 direct reports. Shortly after eBay went public, they were growing like crazy. It was also total chaos and we were losing employees to other Silicon Valley companies. In fact, about 25% of our employees left each year. I worked about 10 hours a day for seven days.

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In 2000, I was the second-level manager (that is, the Director) leading eBay's White Box QA team. In case you were wondering, White Box QA engineers are just programmers developing test software rather than Black Box testers running and reporting test results. Anyway, it had 60 employees with about 20 direct reports. Shortly after eBay went public, they were growing like crazy. It was also total chaos and we were losing employees to other Silicon Valley companies. In fact, about 25% of our employees left each year. I worked about 10 hours a day, seven days a week at a brutal rate. He knew he was good at being a senior manager, but he wasn't happy doing it. Then, after 9 months I walked into the vice president's cubicle (no eBay offices) and resigned. Then I went back to being a senior software development engineer at Apple for the third time. I made 15% less money, but I was much happier. That job at eBay was definitely the hardest.

Here's a tip for the interview. If you are ever interviewed in a place where employees keep sleeping bags in their cubicles, don't take the job. I saw it on eBay and didn't realize its importance until later.

Since then, I have returned to Apple two more times for a total of five times in my career: three times as an employee and twice as a freelance software development consultant. The longest time was the fourth time it took almost five years to develop industrial robotics software for Apple factories in China and Ireland. I became very good at eating with chopsticks in Shanghai. My shortest job was at Microsoft where I had a six month contract to help them ship MS Office for MacOSX in 2010. I am currently working for Cisco (for the second time) as a freelance software consultant working remotely from home in 1.2 acres in the Texas Hill Country south of Austin, TX. Not a bad job for a 65-year-old professional engineer.

Some people seem to think that working on the railroad in the train service is very simple. Just hop on and travel between cities. Riley's life. Some rail jobs are like this, but most are hard jobs and some are really hard jobs. These people do not realize that these cars do not ride alone on a train. They don't realize that someone connected the air hoses between each of those cars. The carriages on most trains do not go directly to some industry somewhere and are parked for loading or unloading. Cars are generally changed over and over again en route before they are f

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Some people seem to think that working on the railroad in the train service is very simple. Just hop on and travel between cities. Riley's life. Some rail jobs are like this, but most are hard jobs and some are really hard jobs. These people do not realize that these cars do not ride alone on a train. They don't realize that someone connected the air hoses between each of those cars. The carriages on most trains do not go directly to some industry somewhere and are parked for loading or unloading. Cars are generally changed over and over again en route before they are finally detected in an industry. I'll tell you about the hardest change job I ever worked on in 1980.

When I was on the Houston Extraordinary Guarantee Board of the Kingsville Division of the Missouri Pacific Railroad, I was sometimes sent to work one of the shifting shifting jobs in Angleton, Texas. These were 12-hour-a-day jobs that worked 7 days a week, that is, I worked 84 hours in a week. This was in the blazing sun in humid South Texas. The team would be very excited if they had the opportunity to leave an hour early on Saturday, so they only worked 83 hours that week. Despite their name, these mobile changers generally stayed in the yard, but they had a 100-mile territory where they could work wherever needed.

Typically, the shift team would haul one track and then shift the wagons to other tracks to get them onto the correct trains. The fly change was involved. The locomotive would drag a cut of 10 to 20 cars over the head. The brakeman (often me) was pulling the pegs (to uncouple the cars). The driver operated the radio headset to communicate with the engineer, and the line (launch) switches on the cable, while the rear brakeman operated the switches farthest from the cable.

The driver would say, "Kick them," on the radio, and the engineer would speed up the cars. Then he would say, "That's enough," and the engineer brakes the cars. He would pull the pin behind the car designated on the switch list or by signal from the driver, and the car or cars would roll freely onto one of the tracks. We did this hour after hour after hour. Sometimes the pin would not lift and I would pull the cutter lever over and over again trying to disengage it. Sometimes my arm got so tired that I just couldn't pull anymore. Adding to the hitch was getting into freight cars all day and connecting rigid pipes. (Don't fight a coach. You will lose.) Walking with ballast all day wears you down, because each step requires more effort than regular walking. as the ballast shifts back under your feet. Sometimes I had to manually push a drawbar to align it. I don't know how much that thing weighed, but it had a coupler on the end that was a very small part, and a very small part of the coupler was the knuckle. The knuckle weighed 60 pounds.

We were resting 15 minutes here and there while the driver ran to the depot towards PICL (Perpetual Car Location Inventory), the track to the depot clerk. Then he would come back with the list for another track, and we changed it. We got a 1 hour lunch to rejuvenate ourselves. After 12 o'clock was up, I would drag my tired butt to a restaurant somewhere and have a quick bite to eat. Then I would head to the motel and get as much sleep as I could to get ready for the next day's work. I once worked one of these jobs for 11 days straight. That's 132 hours of work without a day off (or around 25 work days for someone with a desk job.

I once dislocated my index finger. On another occasion, I was getting on a locomotive that was moving towards me, and somehow my foot lost step. My hands slid down the railing to the bottom of the steps as the engine dragged me about 25 feet before the driver could stop. He wasn't willing to let go because he didn't want to risk rolling under the wheels and losing a leg. I had some bruises, but I finished the work day. I probably slept a lot that night.

Those 12 hour shift jobs were the hardest I ever worked on.

The last two years I worked on the railroad, they abolished the 4 12-hour shift jobs and replaced them with 6 8-hour shift jobs. A lot of guys from the 12-hour jobs didn't bid or get on the 8-hour jobs as they would have lost a lot of overtime. They found other jobs in Angleton that generally worked more than 12 hours a day, but all had a full day off.

Angleton Yard today as part of Union Pacific RR. in Angleton, Texas.

I think that different people have different standards of what the “hardest job” means to them. I have done many different types of jobs due to the different roles that I have played in my life so far. For me, a job would be extremely difficult if it were out of my control. For example, I love the cooking parts, displaying products to the public, answering customer questions, and challenging myself for sales in my multi-store food demonstration job. However, it was filling out the paperwork forms that made me feel really difficult as it was out of my control. In fact, I never had and

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I think that different people have different standards of what the “hardest job” means to them. I have done many different types of jobs due to the different roles that I have played in my life so far. For me, a job would be extremely difficult if it were out of my control. For example, I love the cooking parts, displaying products to the public, answering customer questions, and challenging myself for sales in my multi-store food demonstration job. However, it was filling out the paperwork forms that made me feel really difficult as it was out of my control. In fact, I never had and I lost this job because of it. This part was to keep track of the samples that customers had tried and to record how many products the store had before and after my demo. It was very difficult for me to do it since:

  1. I couldn't track the samples consumed exactly. Some samples were not delivered to the customer's hands through small cups. Sometimes I just used paper towels. How exactly could I count them? Some customers grabbed multiple paper towels for a single piece of food at a time. You couldn't say "no" could you?
  2. It was really difficult to track the products sold during my demo, as I was focused on customers all the time, I really didn't have time to follow the supplements, causing the number to constantly change. By the way, my sales were very good.
  3. Some products, such as French fries, were placed in many places in the store, and even in one place, they were placed in several overlapping layers on the shelf, and it took me a long time to count correctly. And some frozen items took me almost 10 minutes to finish counting as they crawled to the bottom of the shelf. I was really uncomfortable with wasting electricity in opening the refrigerator door for a long time. I'd say if I did this counting job correctly, I would spend half my time on it, which I don't like and don't think it has any meaning. I want to dedicate every minute to my clients, cooking the food and the sales. That was it. It was very hard work for me.

Another more difficult job is educating children. It's very hard because they don't listen to me. Every time I try to teach them something new, they both open their eyes wide, saying that the teachers didn't say that and the teachers didn't use that way. Your entire brain is restricted by teachers and schools. It is really difficult to instill a new thought in their minds. Maybe it's my children's own problems. Also, it is very difficult for me to set a good example for children through my words and actions. Fighting, bad language, selfish and rude behavior are all influencing them. I have to work really hard on myself to be as good as I should be and raise them as a capable parent. Being a qualified mother is always a challenging job for me.

These are the two hardest jobs I've ever had. Maybe they are easy for you. I have a lot to learn to be a professional worker and a good mother.

The hardest job I have ever had in my life lasted two days.

I was 19 years old and had just lost my job. My dad's friend managed to get me an interview with a temp company that had a direct relationship with a major plastics manufacturing company. They gave him a trial with the temp agency and if the manufacturing company liked him, they hired him directly. So that's the background.

The plant had what they called firefighting shifts (12 hours), one week you would work 48 hours, the next you would work 36. Sounds great, right? Three days off one week, four days off the next? I thought the same, until I realized

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The hardest job I have ever had in my life lasted two days.

I was 19 years old and had just lost my job. My dad's friend managed to get me an interview with a temp company that had a direct relationship with a major plastics manufacturing company. They gave him a trial with the temp agency and if the manufacturing company liked him, they hired him directly. So that's the background.

The plant had what they called firefighting shifts (12 hours), one week you would work 48 hours, the next you would work 36. Sounds great, right? Three days off one week, four days off the next? I thought the same, until I realized that during these 12 hour shifts you. it did not. stop. Moving. I was 19 years old and until that moment I had only worked in fast food, I did not know the meaning of HARD WORK.

The temp agency couldn't find my file, so they sent me to the flat at a particular station, one that made lawn chairs. What could be so difficult about making lawn chairs? The supervisor showed me the ropes; Take the chair out of the mold, place it on the cooling rack, scrape the edges down with a special tool, tear the tab on the back of the mold, wrap the legs of each other chair with plastic wrap (cling film for my friends across the pond), then place the finished chair on these rolling shelves, stacking them no more than 8 high.

No problem ... right? Except for the fact that I had 25 seconds to do all of this ... and the mold couldn't be opened for more than 10 seconds or severe deformation could occur.

25 seconds x 12 hours a day = a lot of damn chairs.

By the end of the second day, my body was SCREAMING at me. I was lying in the tub (I never bathe, only showers for this child), with the water as hot as I could bear, questioning my will to live. My muscles were atrophying, every joint in my body was on fire. I leave. I still regret that I did it to this day. I've worked harder jobs since then, so looking back, I could have done wonderfully there.

Come find out, I wasn't supposed to be in the apartment, the temp agency messed up my paperwork, and I was supposed to be in the paint department. Yes, my butt was black and blue from my own kicks.

I hope this helps.

When you say "more difficult", do you mean the most impossible to complete a change to the satisfaction of you or any boss?

Or when you say "more difficult" you mean challenging but ultimately very rewarding?

Or maybe you just mean "more difficult" as the one that in the eyes of the world requires the most specialized qualifications that hardly anyone else has?

Ok ... let's run with the nightmare scenarios that stuck in my head the most.

When I was in my early 20s, I got a job in retail. I was a little slow in getting paid, in stock rotation, and in all the other tasks. Once one Manager went on vacation, the other Manager went

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When you say "more difficult", do you mean the most impossible to complete a change to the satisfaction of you or any boss?

Or when you say "more difficult" you mean challenging but ultimately very rewarding?

Or maybe you just mean "more difficult" as the one that in the eyes of the world requires the most specialized qualifications that hardly anyone else has?

Ok ... let's run with the nightmare scenarios that stuck in my head the most.

When I was in my early 20s, I got a job in retail. I was a little slow in getting paid, in stock rotation, and in all the other tasks. Once one manager went on vacation, the other manager got sick, and a couple of staff members also didn't show up for their shifts.

My other supervisor, my opposite number, my partner ... didn't show up either.

I was stuck in a convenience store around the clock for seventy-two hours.

Then I went home and literally slept for two days and two nights.

The other big one probably worked for a multi-story car park company.

He often toured two locations a night, patrolling each of them four times a night. There are 8 patrols. Then you have the cleanup schedule and email bugs that need to be corrected or by radio.

So you have machines that fail and you have to fix them.

I was often yelled at on the radio to deal with an emergency while I dealt with another equally important situation. I found myself telling a couple of colleagues to fuck each other. One manager especially yelled at me face to face through a fire exit door that wouldn't lock. I calmly told him that I had reported him half a dozen times.

She insisted no.

I insisted that I had, and that they told me to do my best to keep it closed and secured. We had been robbed so many cars that our liability insurance policy was probably in jeopardy.

I left after that.

My hardest job, huh?

Let's see, I was a library assistant, a seismic geophysicist and had five different jobs there, a graduate school (now that's work and a full-time job) and a student lab assistant. Then, data entry clerk, becoming lead clerk, library assistant (again), administrative assistant, and finally study coordinator for a large pharmaceutical research company. My last paid job was as a computer operator at a bank.

There were difficult parts in each position, but for the most part, I was able to enjoy them and get a good workout. Well, an exception would be my last year of graduate school.

Now I am retired but

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My hardest job, huh?

Let's see, I was a library assistant, a seismic geophysicist and had five different jobs there, a graduate school (now that's work and a full-time job) and a student lab assistant. Then, data entry clerk, becoming lead clerk, library assistant (again), administrative assistant, and finally study coordinator for a large pharmaceutical research company. My last paid job was as a computer operator at a bank.

There were difficult parts in each position, but for the most part, I was able to enjoy them and get a good workout. Well, an exception would be my last year of graduate school.

Now I am retired but first disabled (thank you, bank), I do volunteer work. I drive people to appointments, do medical transcription for a free clinic, and help our local cat rescue by fostering and performing other duties as assigned.

I have been doing medical transcription for over 16 years. I get 'paid' for at least one free Pizza Hut pizza a year for the past four years, since it's all really unpaid volunteer work. It's hard work even for two evening clinics a week. Certainly there. Different providers have different styles, speeds, terms, pronunciations, and complexity of their dictations. I'm not sure I would do it for money. I do it for providers and patients. Fortunately, he had the background to at least not be a newbie at it.

But I still think the hardest job I've ever had has been helping with the Cat Rescue (Mew Haven, Inc.) annual yard sale. Our family never had them. Somehow I had it a year ago. The items for the garage sale are all donated and we really don't want junk or things that don't work. Batteries we can do, but electronics repair is not possible. We usually have a lot of books.

But that's hard work. I think it's the hardest job I've ever done. Putting up tents, covering things at night, making sure things are displayed well, and working with the public and my friends. It is exciting and exhausting. But one year, with sales and donations, we made $ 2000.

We didn't have one this year. Various reasons - weather - cold, 'alpha cat' - very stressed, and worst of all, light-toed neighbors.

When I was 20 I had several jobs that were tough, certainly not as bad as many, but tough nonetheless. My first real paycheck job was as a riveter on an assembly line that made trailer truck bodies. We'd wait for the 50-foot-long aluminum side panel to come out of the press that held the panels together, and then me and another guy would have to wrestle with the 50-foot-long bottom rail on the panels, and then I'd get on a little stool on wheels, he was holding a crushed iron bar while the other guy sent about 500 rivets through the rail and panel, and crushed them as he

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When I was 20 I had several jobs that were tough, certainly not as bad as many, but tough nonetheless. My first real paycheck job was as a riveter on an assembly line that made trailer truck bodies. We'd wait for the 50-foot-long aluminum side panel to come out of the press that held the panels together, and then me and another guy would have to wrestle with the 50-foot-long bottom rail on the panels, and then I'd get on a Little stool on wheels, he was holding a crushed iron bar while the other guy sent about 500 rivets through the rail and panel, and crushed them while he used the gun.

The aggravating part was lifting the railing under the edges of all the vertical panels that made up the entire side panel, and then getting all the rivet holes lined up so that Weasel (that was his name ...) could push the rivets so I could dollar.

I did that for a whole summer in this truck factory. The following summer, I built air brake assemblies for the rear tire carriers, and was coming home smeared in Perma-tex every night ... and the following summer I mounted big truck tires on tires to ship to the rear racks in those who had worked. last year…

A second job, which fortunately only lasted about four months, was in the impregnation department of a small electrical component manufacturer that made high-voltage capacitors. They were big steel pots the size of a trash can with miles and miles of kraft paper and foil wrapped in layers in the can. After putting the dry paper / aluminum foil roll in the can, we would have to drop it into a large tub of trichlorethylene and mineral oil, heat it to about 120 ′ F, and then after it soaked for a couple of days , take a soldering iron and seal the lid and any other openings on the can WHILE IT WAS IN THE HOT OIL, by hand. Oh. Then take out the can and put it in an autoclave for a few days. I worked 12 hours a day for 110 days in a row in 1974,

I was relatively new to my job as a mechanical engineer in the engineering department of a large machine shop. The office was an open concept and Sam, one of the production guys, sat about 30 feet from my desk, across from me. We share the room with 6 other people.

Sam was in his mid-forties and a long-term employee. He was a good guy and considered him a friend. We joke around a lot.

One morning while we were working, Sam suddenly stood up, clutched his chest, and then fell and hit his head on the corner of a filing cabinet.

We all assumed that Sam was having a heart attack, but no one really knew

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I was relatively new to my job as a mechanical engineer in the engineering department of a large machine shop. The office was an open concept and Sam, one of the production guys, sat about 30 feet from my desk, across from me. We share the room with 6 other people.

Sam was in his mid-forties and a long-term employee. He was a good guy and considered him a friend. We joke around a lot.

One morning while we were working, Sam suddenly stood up, clutched his chest, and then fell and hit his head on the corner of a filing cabinet.

We all assumed that Sam was having a heart attack, but no one really knew what to do. The impact with the filing cabinet severed his head, so there was a lot of blood on the floor. We called the ambulance and waited for them to arrive.

He hated the feeling of helplessness. It was difficult to look and not know what to do.

Sam didn't make it.

The boss told us that we could go home if we wanted or needed, but I lived alone and preferred to stay at work where I could keep busy. He didn't want to think about what had just happened. Almost everyone else left the office or had an early lunch.

Shortly before noon, a young man came into the office and asked for Sam. I assumed it was a sales rep who had a lunch meeting scheduled, so I told him that Sam was not available at the moment. He pressed me on Sam's location so I asked for his business card and told him that someone would call him later and I apologized that Sam was not available.

That's when the worst part happened. This young man realized that he thought he was making a sales call, he said "Sam is my dad ..."

I told him that Sam had a heart attack that morning and this kid asks "so ... is he in the hospital?"

I had to shake my head to say no. I could not speak.

The young man ran out of the office and headed home.

That was almost 30 years ago and it is by far the hardest thing I have ever had to do at work.

I spent a few years hopping around a bit as opportunities presented themselves and some failed and others ... well ... mistakes ... however ... they were all experiences that gave me the opportunity to grow.

I accepted a job as a service manager for an advertising company. They had special signals that were mechanical. They were located in every major city in Canada and a problem had arisen that could ruin the company. I assumed the then owner had hired the wrong person and things were falling apart. My interview was quick and easy and it took us about a month to fully understand the machines, but then

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I spent a few years hopping around a bit as opportunities presented themselves and some failed and others ... well ... mistakes ... however ... they were all experiences that gave me the opportunity to grow.

I accepted a job as a service manager for an advertising company. They had special signals that were mechanical. They were located in every major city in Canada and a problem had arisen that could ruin the company. I assumed the then owner had hired the wrong person and things were falling apart. My interview was quick and easy and it took us about a month to fully understand the machines, but then I was faced with the biggest challenge I have ever had.

There were approximately 15 machines that required repair ... it was not a complicated job, but the parts were heavy and the time extremely short. They gave me 2 weeks to travel to all the places and fix them, but also to set up some kind of repair network on the west coast for 6 of the machines or we would risk losing the contract and the company would probably withdraw.

For 2 weeks I slept every spare minute and rolled my butt in and out of airplanes. The airport benches were my bedroom and Cara's caterers were my food options. I started in PEI and things seemed to be going well until I got to Montreal, where daylight became my adversary. I was about to miss a day due to lack of connecting flights and too short a schedule. Realizing that I had to think outside the box, I noticed various types of annoying corporations, so I requested a bunch of them that were apparently in the same bucket as me. I proposed to charter a plane to go from Montreal to Ottawa and we could be there in an hour. We worked together to find our 6 needed passengers and went to the counter and caught our flight. Well, It looked like a plane to be chartered by Indianna Jones, and the pilot was wearing a cap with a strap. The plane flight was bumpy, cold, and irratic, not to mention the flight meal, a bag of peanuts, and a soda. Even the stewardess wore a parka. I had nothing but dirty looks the entire flight. I got to Ottawa just in time and finished the job just 20 minutes before closing. I got back to the airport an hour later and took my next flight to BC, which was my longest dream in days. I basically hit the seat and passed out. I got to Ottawa just in time and finished the job just 20 minutes before closing. I got back to the airport an hour later and took my next flight to BC, which was my longest dream in days. I basically hit the seat and passed out. I got to Ottawa just in time and finished the job just 20 minutes before closing. I got back to the airport an hour later and took my next flight to BC, which was my longest dream in days. I basically hit the seat and passed out.

When I got to Calgary, I walked into Claud Neon, who proposed that he could handle our western service contracts, and had a meeting with the president of the company. Death seemed to be heating up. I apologized and gave him my presentation, which I'm absolutely sure looked like a car sales pitch from a guy with the worst flu on record. I was a mess. I was sincere and honest ... I described my trip and what was being done. He looked at me, smiled and said ... "You have done all this so far in a week and a few days ... when is your next flight?" I told him that he had about 2 hours to secure the deal and that he had to be back on another plane. He smiled the long minute and said. What the heck ... I've made riskier deals. He took me out for a quick lunch and then took me to the airport with the signed documents.

I finished my degree and I finished my job. I got a 5k bonus and my boss shook my hand so hard I thought he was going to take it from me.

I'm not going to lie, the money was fabulous ... but what meant the most to me then and now was the faith and respect that the president of Clade Neon gave me, the appreciation my boss gave me, and my own satisfaction that I tried to keep my word. honor my challenge and did what I promised. You are only as good as the last honorable deed. So keep doing your best and make every move honorable.

This is an answer that I would like to answer, as I think I did it last week, unfortunately. Also, I am still sick and in pain all over my body from it.

Due to COVID-19, many companies are not hiring new workforce at this time. I have been trying to find a day job for over weeks with no success. I applied for more than 20 jobs that tend to fill literally everyone.

Production work, supermarket staff, whatever and I requested it. Not a single callback or email in my mailbox. Until a call finally came, after applying for a job suggested by my father's new love.

This is undoubtedly the hard part

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This is an answer that I would like to answer, as I think I did it last week, unfortunately. Also, I am still sick and in pain all over my body from it.

Due to COVID-19, many companies are not hiring new workforce at this time. I have been trying to find a day job for over weeks with no success. I applied for more than 20 jobs that tend to fill literally everyone.

Production work, supermarket staff, whatever and I requested it. Not a single callback or email in my mailbox. Until a call finally came, after applying for a job suggested by my father's new love.

Without a doubt, this is the hardest job, both mentally and physically, that I have ever done. He was as a co-pilot for a company that delivered washing machines, ovens and refrigerators to people's homes. Although I was warned in advance that it would involve lifting very heavy objects, I did give it a try.

6:00 am that hellish day - I woke up and already heard it was raining a lot outside. Since I don't have a raincoat and / or pants, I had to go with my normal jacket, jeans and sneakers, since I don't have work shoes either.

I pedaled for over half an hour in the pouring rain and strong wind towards the similar distribution center where I was supposed to arrive on time.

Now what happens here is that they require you to be there at 7:15, while work starts at 7:30, but the fact is, your work starts when you get there. Basically, you already work 15-20 minutes for free.

And by work I mean WORK. The heaviest part of the day is exactly those 20 unpaid minutes. Where you have to lift the heaviest appliances you can imagine from the loading dock to the truck with which the merchandise will be delivered to the customers.

Now, if you break something during those 20 minutes, it will be deducted from your salary. Which I think is very unconvincing as accidents happen and what if you're a 15-year-old high school kid and you smash a giant $ 2,000 TV or dents a $ 4,000 American two-door refrigerator?

Although countries have certain rules on the maximum carrying capacity for humans, this company did not follow them at all. Also, no work gloves or utilities such as a stanley knife or some rope are provided to make the lifting process of certain items safer and / or lighter for personnel.

Anyway, I loaded 8 washers, 2 dryers, 1 dishwasher, 3 huge flat screen TVs, and 2 American double door refrigerators into the truck with just the use of a wheelbarrow and finally my hardest 20 minutes. Life later I sat in the truck next to the driver.

All in wet clothes, shivering from the cold, happy to be in the air-conditioned van. According to COVID-19, both the driver and I had to wear mouth masks all the time, also in the car. Man, I couldn't even breathe properly during the 45 minute drive to the first stop.

Well this was just a "simple washing machine" so I put down the loading thing, use the stupid handcart, push it under the machine, lift it up using the "special" technique the guy showed me that morning and transport it to the recipient's home.

Ah great, first a curb was my obstacle in what was supposed to be an easy delivery, then this person's aisle was so small that I tore my hand a bit during transport through the first door.

Not much of a rant, but these folks know a great article is going to be delivered. Why are there like 10 pairs of shoes still on the floor, dish towels on the floor that act as a door mat, etc.?

Anyway, having finally made it to the kitchen, I thought the first stop was over and we would get back to the van. No. The old washing machine had to be uninstalled, and I had to hand over all the necessary equipment for this process to the driver, who also acts as a mechanic installing the appliances.

Now something happened here that I really, really didn't like and will never forget. Just before the recipient had to pay for the delivery of the new washing machine and the removal of the old one, I was ordered to "just transport the old washing machine to the truck and wait inside the truck."

Like it's stupid. We all know that during the payment, which was possible with cash, (cash on delivery), people who order these types of items usually tip, and tip well. It's probably the main reason some people keep doing this type of work, as I read online that some of them make $ 250 a day just in tips or more.

But of course I wouldn't see the tip from the first customer as I was ordered to wait in the truck.

Now, just a little side fact here: I once owned a door-to-door sales business, employing over 250 high school kids where lots of cash payments were made and I always knew when a kid "cheated."

It is almost like playing poker. When the driver returned to the truck and put on his seat belt, he hit the left pocket of his work pants twice, where the outline of a wad of bills could be clearly seen. This tapping not only ensures that the money is there, it is a signal. Basically it means: "money in your pocket". '

As it was my first and fortunately only day of work in that company, I did not dare to ask him if he had received a tip, I just knew it.

Anyway, we drove 14 more stops that day. And this same thing would happen 13 more times. Every time the recipient had to pay, I was "slyly" ordered at just 30 seconds or so in advance, to go to the truck and wait and this guy, not knowing anything about my past adventures, thought he hadn't given me account of nothing. He was doing.

All day long, every time I sat in the van after a delivery, I was in the mood to really, really verbally assault him on the ground and say things like, "who do you think I am?" the hardest work, while chatting with recipients and tipping them? ''

But I did not.

Anyway, the last stop of the day was also the heaviest, cruellest, and most thankless moment of my entire life, and I've been through a lot.

We arrived at an apothecary, where I already knew it because it was the only item left in the truck, we had to deliver a very large, $ 5000 + costing Samsung 15-year first-line double-door warranty, very expensive ultra - American fridge of luxury.

A guy wearing a McGregor sweater and a shirt under it, wearing expensive glasses, came out of the pharmacy and said the delivery had to be made around the corner, at his house.

Now, I swear to God, I have never seen such a high luxury and price in one place. It started with 2 Tesla S model cars off the driveway, costing $ 100k + each. So this huge house was attached to the pharmacy or it was just a big building, whatever you want to call it.

Already in the hallway he had seen like silver scales in cabinets, microscopes in cabinets and whatever. As literally any thief would only have to be in the hallway, 1 meter or 3 feet away from the entrance, in order to steal thousands of dollars worth of expensive art decorations.

Then through the living room, with a huge fancy fireplace system etc, my coworker and I walked into the kitchen, which of course, as you can imagine, looked like a live kitchen where they are filming TV cooking shows, with granite all over and like 4 built in ovens.

Now at least this apothecary and his wife, who came downstairs while we were looking at the old fridge to be removed, were at least smart. They literally had like 50 towels on hand and placed them everywhere on the floor, creating a path to the front door, so we didn't scratch your expensive floor during our work.

Long story short, we spent over an hour removing the old refrigerator, taking out the doors because it could never be carried by two people and it would at least be lighter to transport to the truck.

Then it was time to transport the new refrigerator home and install it "without damaging the granite." When we finally got to her kitchen with this heaviest thing I ever lifted and peeled off the protective styrofoam, the apothecary's wife noticed a super small dent on the side of the refrigerator. When I say small, I mean a millimeter or 2-3, max.

'' I don't want to have it. It is damaged, I do not pay for the damaged merchandise, '' said the woman.

I couldn't believe what my ears were hearing. Not only me, but also my co-worker, her husband and even her daughter, I couldn't believe it. "After all this work, don't be like that," her husband tried to calm his wife. Even the daughter said, "Mom, you can't be like that."

My coworker called the central sales office and finally offered a coupon worth $ 250, but the woman refused. '' No, remove it, put the old one back in, I'll cancel the order and want all my money back, plus anything extra if I notice that something is damaged in transit. ''

Well here we went again, super heavy thing in this incredibly expensive house, back in the truck, the old one back, the doors getting repaired again, etc. and finally exiting.

Now this was of course the only stop where the driver obviously didn't get a tip. All we got was a 200 gram bag of beehive shaped honey liquor from the apothecary.

On our way back to the distribution center, we didn't even speak to each other for more than 30 minutes. (We were already 11 hours at work by the way, it was more than 6:00 p.m.).

Once we finally pulled into a gas station, I had the courage to ask the driver, "does this happen often?", And he responded with, "no, this is the first time I've come across something like that."

I WILL NEVER DO A JOB LIKE THIS AGAIN AND BE TREATED AS I WAS, NEVER, NEVER AGAIN.

Those were my only thoughts at the time. I'll be my own boss, work on my projects online, write more on Quora, maybe write a book.

And that was my brain on the 30 minute bike ride home after we got to the depot and after I had filled my hours, again and still in the pouring rain.

The day after I woke up at 9:07 am, while I was supposed to be at that distribution center again at 7:15 and had set an alarm on my phone. Courteous as I am, I called the work center and told them that I slept through my alarm and that this is not my type of job and asked if they had anything else for me.

This is now 4 days ago in my life. I still have pain in my back, arms, legs, chest, whatever, there is pain. Also, I had fever-like symptoms from cycling in the rain and wind.

However, I will never forget this experience in life and it was an honor to have contributed to Quora with this answer.

Fun fact: the refrigerator that had to be delivered at the last stop is called the Samsung refrigerator '' family hub '', with an iPad integrated like a huge iPad, speaking of the problems of the first country in the world, right?

I once transferred a baby to the NICU who passed away. I took care of a beautiful red-haired mother who had just given birth to a beautiful baby girl. The mother was so excited to finally have a girl, because she had two older boys at home. The day shift had called the neonatologist to evaluate the baby because she had low temperatures and respiratory problems. The NICU was very busy that day and they refused to transfer the baby. Instead, they asked that the baby undergo continuous pulse oximetry and be monitored. At that time, she had been working in the postpartum unit for less than a year.

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I once transferred a baby to the NICU who passed away. I took care of a beautiful red-haired mother who had just given birth to a beautiful baby girl. The mother was so excited to finally have a girl, because she had two older boys at home. The day shift had called the neonatologist to evaluate the baby because she had low temperatures and respiratory problems. The NICU was very busy that day and they refused to transfer the baby. Instead, they asked that the baby undergo continuous pulse oximetry and be monitored. At that time, she had been working in the postpartum unit for less than a year. Now, with six years of experience as a postpartum nurse, I wonder if I would have been able to more quickly identify that the baby was very ill. The baby had repeated low temperatures despite being placed under the radiant warmer. Sometimes babies experience thermoregulation problems as a result of low birth weight or prematurity. The baby was 34 weeks and 4 days old. So the low cutoff temperatures weren't particularly alarming. Then the baby began to develop an increased heart rate. The NICU was called again. What I did not know at the time was that the mother was positive for group B strep and that the baby was septic. The neonatologist agreed to transfer the baby to the NICU. I rolled the mother into a wheelchair after the neonatologist explained what was going on. When we got to the NICU, I remember being quite surprised by the increase in the baby's respiratory effort. Even so, he had no reason to believe that the baby would not get better. I thought that whatever problem he had was not something that an insulator to raise his temperature and some antibiotics couldn't fix. I got off work that morning and went to bed. When I got back to work at night, I ran to the beautiful red-haired mother in the hall. She was crying. When I asked him how his daughter was, he murmured, "She's dead." The beautiful girl who had just given birth had passed away. I hugged her and told her how sorry I was. It was really difficult to do my job that day. I took a break from work and cried for several days. I blamed myself wondering if there was something I could have done that would have resulted in the baby being saved. The incident still haunts me to this day. If there's one thing I know, it's that the horrible experience improved my ability to recognize a septic baby a thousandfold. When new nurses ask me if I should be concerned about a baby with a slightly elevated temperature, I say, "Yes, but sometimes they should be even more concerned about a baby with a low temperature."

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