What is the hardest part of the job search?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Maya Massey



What is the hardest part of the job search?

The hardest part of any job search is being motivated.

A few years ago when I was in my master's program (in 2015) looking for an internship, I was applying for jobs like crazy. I used to apply for 50+ jobs every day at least. I remember how difficult it was. It took me 6 months to find an internship. But to get that internship, I had to apply at least (10 days in a month, 50 applications in a day, for 6 months) ~ 3000 different jobs. It was very difficult to stay motivated and keep up for 6 months. In addition, the news that your friends found work was a ray of light and at the same time t

Keep reading

The hardest part of any job search is being motivated.

A few years ago when I was in my master's program (in 2015) looking for an internship, I was applying for jobs like crazy. I used to apply for 50+ jobs every day at least. I remember how difficult it was. It took me 6 months to find an internship. But to get that internship, I had to apply at least (10 days in a month, 50 applications in a day, for 6 months) ~ 3000 different jobs. It was very difficult to stay motivated and keep up for 6 months. Also, the news that your friends found work was a ray of light and at the same time a bit sad. Good news because it tells you that the job market is good and that people are being hired. Sad because your friend found a job and you didn't.

Even after 4 years, I get rejection emails from some of the companies I had applied to.

You can see in the screenshot above, I applied in November 2015 and got the answer this morning (after almost 4 years). I'm glad I didn't wait in this app;)

Also, I want these companies to be a little more diligent in updating candidates. For companies it is just another application, but for a candidate it can be a life changing step.

Good luck to all job seekers.
If I can find a job, you definitely will!

There are two alternatives to consider.

First, suppose the job seeker is currently employed. In this case, a major challenge is conducting the job search, making contacts, and conducting interviews without the current employer knowing about it. Another challenge is having the humility to get a professional resume writer to develop a top-notch resume. Too many job seekers believe they can write an acceptable resume.

Second, suppose the job seeker has recently been fired or fired. In this case, a very common challenge is overcoming anger at being in this unexpected position. Job search

Keep reading

There are two alternatives to consider.

First, suppose the job seeker is currently employed. In this case, a major challenge is conducting the job search, making contacts, and conducting interviews without the current employer knowing about it. Another challenge is having the humility to get a professional resume writer to develop a top-notch resume. Too many job seekers believe they can write an acceptable resume.

Second, suppose the job seeker has recently been fired or fired. In this case, a very common challenge is overcoming anger at being in this unexpected position. The job seeker must redirect the energy that drives anger into constructive job search actions. In relation to direction and energy, the job seeker should look to get the next job as a 40 to 60 hour task per week. Key actions include getting a sharp resume, researching the job market, learning how to use internet job search tools, and networking ... networks ... networks.

Be optimistic!

Finding a job that suits your ambitions and needs is by no means an easy task. One thing that you will find abundant in your job searches is stress.

From the frustration of getting those alignments on your resume to not receiving a response from recruiters even after applying for the 100th position, to finally landing a job that you would like to settle for and not being offered sufficient compensation.

Or if a job that can provide good compensation may not have a good work culture or one that aligns with your career goals, doesn't pay as much as your current job, or is in a geographic location.

Keep reading

Be optimistic!

Finding a job that suits your ambitions and needs is by no means an easy task. One thing that you will find abundant in your job searches is stress.

From the frustration of getting those alignments on your resume to not receiving a response from recruiters even after applying for the 100th position, to finally landing a job that you would like to settle for and not being offered sufficient compensation.

Or if a job that can provide good compensation may not have a good work culture or one that aligns with your career goals, doesn't pay as much as your current job, or is in a geographic location, making daily commute difficult. . And so on!

For many of us, the perfect job doesn't exist. Most of the time we start our job searches with something else in mind and settle for something else halfway. The only way to mitigate the problem is to have enough buffer time when planning to change jobs.

Put the technicalities of job hunting aside, keeping a positive outlook while looking for a job is a big task! Managing stress during a job search is as big a task as landing a perfect job.

Get ahead of employers! I mean, once you get interviewed, you gain confidence in how you present yourself as an asset.
You really need to analyze job descriptions (post offers) to make sure you fine-tune your resume and fine-tune your sales pitch in your communication with recruiters. On the other hand, probably being honest about what you really want to do as a career is the next most important and unwieldy aspect when looking for a job ... Make sure ypu doesn't burn out in the process, this may lead to him accepting a job that you do not like!

Repetition. Those fields in which they request information about their previous jobs. You want to scream, because they have your resume! Cub, life isn't fair. They are not responsible for all the applications that you must complete. Take the time to write something in that space that is really special. Talk only about what counts for that job directly for which you are applying. Limit yourself to five or seven sentences, unless they require more. Short and sweet. They will think you are a star. As Ryan Holiday often says, The Obstacle is the Way, a great book by him.

I currently work as a supervisor in a polymer extrusion plant, but I am looking for other opportunities. Every job I've had was very easy to get. I never really had a formal interview until a month ago when I interviewed for a supervisor position at a global plastics engineering facility. I never felt so bad about myself after that interview. I'm clearly qualified for the position, but I wasn't ready for the interview at all! I didn't do much research on the company and the interview felt like an interrogation. Needless to say, I didn't get the job. I guess I imagined my

Keep reading

I currently work as a supervisor in a polymer extrusion plant, but I am looking for other opportunities. Every job I've had was very easy to get. I never really had a formal interview until a month ago when I interviewed for a supervisor position at a global plastics engineering facility. I never felt so bad about myself after that interview. I'm clearly qualified for the position, but I wasn't ready for the interview at all! I didn't do much research on the company and the interview felt like an interrogation. Needless to say, I didn't get the job. I guess I thought my experience and qualifications were enough. Or maybe it was the fact that he had never had an interview before. I can guarantee you one thing, it won't happen again!

Staying organized and on track during your job search is really difficult. It's easy to get confused with different hiring cycles, different app websites, different resumes, etc. This is why you have to use app trackers to stay on track. There are some free ones online like one called Sizigi. Not only is it an app tracker that allows you to enter information about your job applications and see everything on one page, it is also an online portfolio where you can upload your previous jobs and resume to be displayed to hiring managers. Job seekers should definitely give this a try!

I think more than anything else the hardest part is getting proper HR communication, scheduling the next rounds, and getting feedback. I think the process sometimes becomes more exhausting than the interview.

What we see in general is that we receive multiple calls from HR when they have to schedule interviews or when they need information, but they choose not to take or answer calls when we need them or they are quite busy at the time.

PS: No offense to TAs, but we all deal with this most of the time. Also, not everyone and not everywhere is the case. Thanks.

One of the hardest parts is keeping track and staying organized. Often times, we submit dozens of requests and only wait for a response, when follow-ups are so important to get the attention of employers and show that you value the work. I now use this job tracker and an online portfolio site called Sizigi, and it makes it much easier to track applications and remind me to send follow-ups. You should check it out! Here you have a link https://go.joinsizigi.com/karis. Good luck!

1. Waiting for answers. The waiting period kills me, especially if it's a position I want.
2. Get a negative answer. Some of them disappointed me very much and I wallowed in my own pain, but I had to move on. So, I give myself a good talk and resume the application.

  • Stay focused. It's too easy to apply for some positions because I see a lot of soft skills that I have.
  • Patience. It's easy to get desperate and start submitting requests blindly, to see who's responding. Here's a pro tip: The first employer to respond may be just as desperate as I am.
  • Compilation of my professional history. I have experienced this since the mid-1990s. That is why I maintain a well-populated portfolio that I update regularly.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.