What is the general salary range for a robotics engineer?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Cruz Ray



What is the general salary range for a robotics engineer?

The robotic engineer salary varies from,

Experience to Experience

Knowledge to knowledge

Background to background

MNC start

Example:

Fresher, mechanical engineer and electrical or electronic engineer Salary at the start will be 20k to 25k after successfully completing the internship (varies from start to start basically 3-6 months) with the job.

Cooler, the computer engineer salary at the start will be 25k to 35k after successfully completing the internship (the first 3 months will be the evaluation period) with the job.

Most multinational companies will not hire Freshers (off campus) unless you have no connections.

Mechanical Engineer

Keep reading

The robotic engineer salary varies from,

Experience to Experience

Knowledge to knowledge

Background to background

MNC start

Example:

Fresher, mechanical engineer and electrical or electronic engineer Salary at the start will be 20k to 25k after successfully completing the internship (varies from start to start basically 3-6 months) with the job.

Cooler, the computer engineer salary at the start will be 25k to 35k after successfully completing the internship (the first 3 months will be the evaluation period) with the job.

Most multinational companies will not hire Freshers (off campus) unless you have no connections.

The mechanical engineer salary at MNC will be 40k to 65k.

  • 2-5 years of experience
  • Good knowledge about CAD tools like,
    • Solid work
    • CATIA
    • Pro E
    • AutoCAD
    • Autodesk Inventor
  • Good knowledge about GD&T
  • Good knowledge of metric standards
  • Good knowledge about the selection of standard parts
  • Some more requirements depending on the roles ...

But, in India everyone wants to work in robotics but we don't have enough vacancies and the salary is also lower.

Choose wisely what you want to become

All the best

It all depends and varies a lot. For example, most robots perform repetitive CNC-type operations that just about anyone can easily program, so it's not a very high paying skill. They are paid more for their experience in installing, modifying and handling the machine. Then there are more expensive robotic machines that can be programmed in more complex ways, as part of any assembly line etc, but that again would depend on whether they were only set up once and only repeated, or were always instead. required that they do so. something different? The best paid would be those who design robotic machines t

Keep reading

It all depends and varies a lot. For example, most robots perform repetitive CNC-type operations that just about anyone can easily program, so it's not a very high paying skill. They are paid more for their experience in installing, modifying and handling the machine. Then there are more expensive robotic machines that can be programmed in more complex ways, as part of any assembly line, etc., but that again would depend on whether they were only set up once and only repeated, or were always instead. required that they do so. something different? The highest paid would be those who design the robotic machines themselves, but that would be a much smaller market. I assume the salary range would be something like $ 45k to $ 120k?

It depends on your skills and experiences, not your title. If you have a good command of systems design, dynamics, and innovation, your career will prosper.

The robotics industry is currently booming. And above all, as refreshing, you may not get a chance to be a part of it. However as far as I understand India Robotics Developer would earn a minimum of 50k per month and a maximum of 200k per month. If you are interested in understanding the jobs in RPA, please watch my video on YouTube (link attached below)

"Skate to where the record is going to be, not to where it has been."

As the saying above goes, 3 years ago I took some time to think about what will be BIG in 15 years. All I could see was robots everywhere in different shapes (cleaning robots, laundry robots, driving robots, etc) ... and I decided that the next 15 years I will keep moving towards this trend.

Why?
Again, as the saying goes "Aim for the stars, if you fail, you'll land on the moon" ... that is. Even if I am not able to create the perfect robotics company by then, at least I would be the person who would make an essential part of the robot when the revolution

Keep reading

"Skate to where the record is going to be, not to where it has been."

As the saying above goes, 3 years ago I took some time to think about what will be BIG in 15 years. All I could see was robots everywhere in different shapes (cleaning robots, laundry robots, driving robots, etc) ... and I decided that the next 15 years I will keep moving towards this trend.

Why?
Again, as the saying goes "Aim for the stars, if you fail, you'll land on the moon" ... that is. Even if I am not able to create the perfect robotics company by then, at least I would be the person who would make an essential part of the robot when the revolution happens (maybe just the eye, the finger or some sensor of the robot ... in itself will be a multibillion dollar industry)

But how?
As you clearly mentioned, it is very difficult to get into robotics! Even the Biggies heading into robotics don't know exactly if the path is right ... how can someone like me do anything in this area? There were even more serious things to consider:
- How am I going to maintain my company's cash flow while chasing this wild dream?
- Being a person with experience in software all my life ... how am I going to learn all the artificial intelligence, electronics, physics, etc. required to enter the field of robotics? It's not something that can be fully learned even in a year (Look, I'm a reasonably smart guy ... but not those kind of guys from Stanford etc who are really good with books and studies ...)

But one thing that encouraged me is: if it's such a difficult area to get into for me ... it should be equally difficult for everyone else ... and that screamed a great opportunity and fair play!

So I drew a mind map of how to achieve this impossible destiny, phase by phase ... so as I go through each phase they tease me with all the required knowledge and I get all the smart people required for different verticals and I also have flow of cash. positive ... and most important of all understanding how the market is shaping itself (as I know running and building a business from it and keeping your business ALIVE is very important even if you have the best product).

My derivation was as follows: before the age of robotics begins ... it will be preceded by the age of artificial intelligence ... and what will lead to artificial intelligence is the smart electronics (i.e. IOT) that it will create Big Data ... break into BIG Data systems to create the AI ​​era.

So we decided Yes, now we are a company :) It is no longer a me ... to enter the IOT space and understand it so well and continue doing projects in it ... so we have a positive cash flow and we believe this wave will automatically take us to the next wave (i.e. AI) ... and from there we can easily enter the era of robotics as it happens. We have already completed some really good IOT projects (and in this process we have understood the whole ecosystem and the WHAT is WHAT of this area). We are already seeing that most of the IOT projects we do are connecting to data analytics platforms ... which will surely slowly enter the AI ​​space.

In my experience so far, I understand that we only need to get the right people / suppliers for different critical areas and even massive electronic projects can be done, while I focus on my strength, that is. Execute, get things done, imagine how you can improve things and keep the business running.

Thanks!

I did this. My bachelor's degree was in computer science, but about a year after that program I realized that I wanted to be a robotics specialist.

It was not easy. Robotics is highly multidisciplinary. It involves applied mathematics (to understand kinematics and dynamics), mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, and computer science. Unfortunately, most computer science programs don't give you the background you need to understand the other disciplines of engineering. An undergraduate program in mechanical engineering, for example, will require you to take and pass classes in differential equations,

Keep reading

I did this. My bachelor's degree was in computer science, but about a year after that program I realized that I wanted to be a robotics specialist.

It was not easy. Robotics is highly multidisciplinary. It involves applied mathematics (to understand kinematics and dynamics), mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, and computer science. Unfortunately, most computer science programs don't give you the background you need to understand the other disciplines of engineering. An undergraduate program in mechanical engineering, for example, will require you to take and pass classes in differential equations, statics, dynamics, and linear control theory. Computer programs generally stop at calculus and then move on to discrete mathematics, which is not really useful for any other engineering discipline.

However, all is not lost: you have some very profitable skills. You are almost certainly a better encoder than most mechanical or electrical engineers.

What I did was take classes that I knew I would need to change disciplines: linear algebra and ordinary differential equations.

I also built robots on my own, in my apartment with some friends. In fact, I considered it my "real" job. I was a student from 9 a. M. At 8 p. M. And roboticist of 8 p. M. A 4 a. M. That gave me enough hands-on experience to know how to make a good solder joint, how to read engineering drawings, at least a little bit, how to do basic machining and metalworking, etc. And it gave me a good appreciation for the other disciplines of engineering.

I then applied to graduate school in aerospace engineering, because AE programs tend to be smaller and more multidisciplinary than other engineering disciplines. They accepted me and immediately sent me to a graduate level control class for which I did not have the necessary training. It took me about two years to build the background I needed to pass those classes. Meanwhile, I worked in a robotics lab on campus. I specialized in helping other people make their code work, because I was a much better programmer than they were; in return, I received help and tutoring in controls, dynamics, etc.

If you are in college, you didn't say so, then this is the approach I recommend. Take linear algebra, differential equations, etc., as electives. Then earn a master's degree in a different engineering discipline.

If you are out of college, take online classes on these subjects. Your goal should be to take and pass an online class on robotic kinematics and dynamics and another on linear controls. You will need calculus, ordinary differential equations, and linear algebra before you can do them. So you have work to do.

In any case, you should also build robots as a hobby. Go to Sparkfun or Adafruit or any of the third party websites, choose a robot that is not just a prepackaged kit and build it. Schedule it. Find out what's good and what's bad. Modify it, make it better. Then choose a more difficult one and do it again.

It will take a couple of years. But it can be done.

The problem with most questions is that people ask how can I do this, how can I achieve that, and no one shares what position you are in to achieve that goal mentioned in the question.

Still let me try. I hope that helps.

What is robotics?

Robotics is a very vague term just to make it sound cool. Any machine can be called a Robot that performs some task for which it was designed. So the washing machine is also a robot. You enter some settings through some knobs and buttons and perform the cleaning task. And similarly, if we go for complex tasks, there are artificial intelligence-based robots that can solve a problem.

Keep reading

The problem with most questions is that people ask how can I do this, how can I achieve that, and no one shares what position you are in to achieve that goal mentioned in the question.

Still let me try. I hope that helps.

What is robotics?

Robotics is a very vague term just to make it sound cool. Any machine can be called a Robot that performs some task for which it was designed. So the washing machine is also a robot. You enter some settings through some knobs and buttons and perform the cleaning task. And similarly, if we go for complex tasks, there are artificial intelligence-based robots that can solve a Rubik's cube, there are industrial automation robots that assemble the amazing cars, military robots that perform dangerous tasks like fuzzy bombs, nanorobots that perform operations based on swarms and the list goes on.

So, robotics is a general term to collectively represent the multidisciplinary engineering branches / technologies that it involves. Simply put, the main components can be divided into hardware and software.

Let's simplify the answer with an example.

Let's say we are building a COOL WALL SCALE ROBOT.

The task of the different teams can be divided as follows;

Since it is a fairly complex mechanical task, mechanical design will be an important part of the solution.

HARDWARE: ROBOT SKELETON

  1. Mechanical concept design
  2. CAD TOOLS design
  3. Run some simulation to validate the design.
  4. And then complete the actual physical structure.

SENSES (EYE / EAR) AND BRAIN OF THE ROBOT

  1. Choosing a Controller: What Kind of Processing Power Will You Need? For example, ATMEL, ARM, Micorchip, etc.
  2. Necessary sensors. - Gyro-sensors,
  3. Programming / Coding - Assembler, C, C ++, etc.

COMMUNICATION: ROBOT SPEECH

  1. Communication protocol: how to give it a command, wireless or wired?
  2. Intercommunication of several modules of this robot. I2C, SPI, CAN, LIN.

POWER SOURCE: ROBOT FOODS

1. Adequate light batteries.

2. Circuits to regulate the power supply.

And finally the Integration of all modules.

It is like bringing a newly created object to life.

So to answer your question:

Choose a task / branch of engineering through which it can satisfy your interest. And keep increasing your knowledge by reading online blogs and watching youtube channels like David L. Jones' EEVBLOG.

If you already know some programming. The easiest step for beginners will be to work on Arduino or Raspberry Pi based projects. There are tons of information, blogs, youtube videos, and online forums available for support if you get stuck somewhere. This will help you get started easily in the automation domain.

I gave you a solution based on a practical approach, but if you are interested in the courses and colleges, check out this link.

Thanks for the A2A

First of all, congratulations on taking a step into robotics. :)

To answer your question.

  • EE and ME have both played, are playing and will play a crucial role in robotics.
  • Robotics is an interdisciplinary field that needs many domains. Yes, one is CS, another is biology, and so on.
  • Robotics is the branch of science and technology that deals with the design, manufacture and application of intelligent machines, as well as the computer systems and software that feed their intelligence. It is the integration of mechanical, electronic and computer engineering in design.
Keep reading

Thanks for the A2A

First of all, congratulations on taking a step into robotics. :)

To answer your question.

  • EE and ME have both played, are playing and will play a crucial role in robotics.
  • Robotics is an interdisciplinary field that needs many domains. Yes, one is CS, another is biology, and so on.
  • Robotics is the branch of science and technology that deals with the design, manufacture and application of intelligent machines, as well as the computer systems and software that feed their intelligence. It is the integration of mechanical, electronic and computer engineering in the design of high-performance hybrid systems that incorporate numerous "smart" or "smart" features.

Now we will analyze this: -

  • Suppose for a humanoid robot you created the physical structure with all the limbs, head and movements that perfectly fit a human (derived from biology) (only the movements) using all the techniques you learned in ME. But it couldn't make it act fast by linear actuators etc, which is part of the US That becomes a well-sculpted physical design, but not a humanoid robot.
  • Now for a well-sculpted design, we have added some electronics that activate movement (head, limbs, eyes and spine, etc.) according to precisely given instructions by a human. That now turns into a well-sculpted physical form that does chores like a man tells it to do. It may be a robot in a sense, but to be precise, it is an animatronic toy.
  • Now add a storage unit, IO ports with a built in processor and load some AI programs on it and tell it the tasks (without giving exact instructions). Now it performs tasks without explicitly scheduling it at every step. That behaves like a humanoid, right.

So, to summarize the previous points. Robotics is an interdisciplinary field that requires all the experts from the fields to collaborate in one and work towards fruitful results.

Go for whichever field you want in undergraduate and take the other in master's!

keep calm and trust robotics :)

Thank you for reading..

-I hope this helps-

I can only say one thing: "I wish they were."

Ok, people with engineering degrees make more money than many other people with different college degrees, but not in large amounts. At best, a newly graduated engineer could earn perhaps only twice what a new teacher or student of English could earn. Starting salaries for a new engineer here (in California) are maybe $ 80K. The salary could double after working for 10 years and changing jobs a few times. He's a 35-year-old making $ 160K "rich." No, real, since you couldn't buy a house in California on that salary.

"Robot engineer" is a bit loose

Keep reading

I can only say one thing: "I wish they were."

Ok, people with engineering degrees make more money than many other people with different college degrees, but not in large amounts. At best, a newly graduated engineer could earn perhaps only twice what a new teacher or student of English could earn. Starting salaries for a new engineer here (in California) are maybe $ 80K. The salary could double after working for 10 years and changing jobs a few times. He's a 35-year-old making $ 160K "rich." No, real, since you couldn't buy a house in California on that salary.

"Robot engineer" is a pretty vague term. Several different types of engineers are needed to design a robot, specialties can be electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, and software engineer. Very few people are experts in all of those fields.

Robots are not really a type of engineering. The electrical engineer working on robot projects might also be working on an automotive entertainment project on his next assignment. Software engineering is like that. I have worked on some robot projects, but also telecom and radar and also some camera firmware. This is not just in engineering. I know a plumber who works for restaurant owners but is not a "restaurant worker." He is a plumber who could also work in homes and industrial buildings. Engineers like the plumber often apply their skills to many different projects throughout their careers.

I'm not sure I know of many downsides, although I haven't worked in robotics for several years.

The pros are numerous. Robotics has been around for a relatively short period of time in the grand scheme of things, so opportunities to make a substantial mark in the field abound.

The work itself is interdisciplinary, which provides many opportunities to learn new things ... if you like that (I like it), then you will be in heaven. However, because the work is so interdisciplinary, you will never be “the” expert on everything and will have to work as a team and depend on others. This is true of

Keep reading

I'm not sure I know of many downsides, although I haven't worked in robotics for several years.

The pros are numerous. Robotics has been around for a relatively short period of time in the grand scheme of things, so opportunities to make a substantial mark in the field abound.

The work itself is interdisciplinary, which provides many opportunities to learn new things ... if you like that (I like it), then you will be in heaven. However, because the work is so interdisciplinary, you will never be “the” expert on everything and will have to work as a team and depend on others. This is true for most engineering jobs, so it is not new.

The job can often be concrete. This makes it easier for non-technical people to understand what you are doing. If you work in a very abstract technical area and try to explain to the parents of your romantic partner what you do, that glassy expression will be familiar ... with robotics you will skip that phase.

Work is fun. I don't know how else to put it, but making something happen in the physical world in response to the software you wrote, based on models you built and analyzed, is a bit of a kick.

One downside, I suppose, is that robotics has, over time, been the target of anxiety about the future of work. If we have more robots, the argument continues, we will have less work for people. The usual defense against this has been, "well, we use robots for dangerous or tedious jobs that people don't want to do."

A more fundamental defense is twofold: (1) the work automation takes on is a menial affair that people generally don't want to do, and (2) automation frees people up to move on to higher-value activities.

Needless to say, this is a complex question with implications for education policy, inequality, and many other difficult issues.

So the biggest downside is that robotics will remain controversial in the minds of the general public.

Robotics has a very bright future. There are a number of reasons the field should take off, as well as additional reasons that make it a great career choice.


Why the field of robotics will take off

The robotics maker movement has started in recent years in large part because of the Arduino and Raspberry Pi. This means that not only is the price of robotics hardware dropping, but sensors and other devices are much easier to find and interact with, there is a large support community, and there are many people with robotics skills now.

Communications costs are falling. Now it's much easier to set up

Keep reading

Robotics has a very bright future. There are a number of reasons the field should take off, as well as additional reasons that make it a great career choice.


Why the field of robotics will take off

The robotics maker movement has started in recent years in large part because of the Arduino and Raspberry Pi. This means that not only is the price of robotics hardware dropping, but sensors and other devices are much easier to find and interact with, there is a large support community, and there are many people with robotics skills now.

Communications costs are falling. It is now much easier to set up small networks within a building, and cellular communication costs are also decreasing. This will dramatically help with the Internet of Things, creating even more possibilities for Big Data.

Batteries are getting better and cheaper, as are solar cells. Not only is it easier to get electricity in remote locations, but this will allow each device to last longer and have more features (as we've seen with smartphones).

Better sensors for lower cost and more processing power are opening up new applications, such as autonomous cars and autonomous airplanes. There are enormous opportunities to increase and replace human control and decision making, especially when safety and life are at stake. Until we all work 3 hours a week like the Jetsons, there is still room for further improvement and automation. The need for automation is huge, and we are often competing against human labor. The transition to automation has been going on for years (robots in car factories, for example), but as the price of hardware falls and the capabilities of hardware and programmers increase, that means more opportunities.


Why Robotics Will Be a Great Career Choice

The field of robotics requires a combination of mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, and computer programming / computer science skills. Even if you are not directly employed in the robotics field, with any of those skill sets you will surely be able to find some kind of employment.

The demand for automation and robotics will only be limited by your creativity. Technological progress is about increasing productivity and that is something that will always be in demand.

I studied mechatronics in college (the most relevant stream for robotics) and had a desire to work on humanoids or robotic cars. Since then I realized that this is a high school student's vision of robotics.

I don't think we will ever have humanoid robots before the singularity, due to the economy. I've explained my reasons here:
robots will also replace androids

I feel like robotic cars are at a stage where only those with PhDs can really add something useful. The central platform works; it's solved. It is only extreme cases, such as driving in the rain, that remain challenges. A graduate engineer is

Keep reading

I studied mechatronics in college (the most relevant stream for robotics) and had a desire to work on humanoids or robotic cars. Since then I realized that this is a high school student's vision of robotics.

I don't think we will ever have humanoid robots before the singularity, due to the economy. I've explained my reasons here:
robots will also replace androids

I feel like robotic cars are at a stage where only those with PhDs can really add something useful. The central platform works; it's solved. It is only extreme cases, such as driving in the rain, that remain challenges. Therefore, a graduate engineer is not needed.

During uni, I became more interested in robot eyes (computer vision) and brain (machine learning) and although there was no opportunity for me to actually work in those areas in the past, with around 2 years of experience I'm finally moving on in recommender systems. I enjoy these areas for the same reasons that I originally liked the cliche ideas of robotics. However, they are an acquired taste; you have to begin to understand them before you can appreciate them, so don't get cynical about the opportunities available.

I encourage you to keep an eye out for solved problems in robotics and avoid those areas. Playing around with a Raspberry Pi and the circuitry could be helpful, and learning about machine learning on the other hand would be helpful. However, everything in between is resolved and therefore there are few jobs in those areas.

Most of all, I wish someone had told me early in my career that getting a degree was not enough to get a job, most of the time. You need to learn additional programming and do some meaningful side projects in your spare time.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.