What is the easiest way to get a job in German? I am looking to "survive".

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Kayla Bailey



What is the easiest way to get a job in German? I am looking to "survive".

There are many companies in the country that offer a good job in the German language. If you are from Delhi NCR, there is a company called concentrix that provides job opportunities for German speakers and pays good salary, so you can try to join that company and get a job. experience.

I like to answer these types of questions, as the person who asked them wants a binary answer, whether yes or no. But in reality, this is not always the case, it depends on many factors, including the person himself. I will try to break down the thinking scenario to make it easier for readers to prepare for their adventure in Germany. The first thing to clarify: What is a student work? * A job that a student can do without affecting their studies and earn some money to finance their studies is k ...

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This is me graduating very happy not realizing that I should have asked myself this question before moving to Germany in 2016 from Pakistan.

I graduated in Biochemistry and Cell Biology in a small town in northern Germany called Bremen. Of course, at the time, I was ignorant of the fact that there is a strong possibility that you need German to work in Germany, and even more so in this very specific field.

Note: At this point in the story, I am a very dumb person.

Around graduation, when I started applying for a job, I realized I had screwed up. Most of the job openings that c

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This is me graduating very happy not realizing that I should have asked myself this question before moving to Germany in 2016 from Pakistan.

I graduated in Biochemistry and Cell Biology in a small town in northern Germany called Bremen. Of course, at the time, I was ignorant of the fact that there is a strong possibility that you need German to work in Germany, and even more so in this very specific field.

Note: At this point in the story, I am a very dumb person.

Around graduation, when I started applying for a job, I realized I had screwed up. Most of the job postings I clicked on asked for a specific thing at the bottom:

"Fließend in Deutsch und English", ie "Fluent in German and English"

Clearly I was missing the German part of it.

Just to make things even more difficult, he was specifically applying for jobs that he didn't have the skills for. Intelligent.

Why do you ask? I hated my major in college and wasn't about to settle for it.

So let's see, I am not fluent in the language nor am I willing to use the skills that I spent 3 years developing. There is absolutely no way for me to get a job, right?

Fast forward 1 year, I work at Entrepreneur First, the world's largest talent investor, where I help super smart people build companies in Berlin.

Being in Germany without speaking the language, you have two options:

  1. Or be a loser and nobody in a German company
  2. Be a high-level player in the emerging startup scene in Germany

70% of the labor market understands the former and that is also why you probably asked this question.

But the last 30% is all yours to take advantage of and in my opinion that's also where innovation and exciting things are brewing and all you need to get a job is a valuable skill set (chances are, you have more tan than you had when you were applying).

If I, as an individual who received the worst possible card, that is, a foreigner who is not fluent in German and has studied a highly research-oriented degree, can make it on the German job market, then anyone can.

Fun fact: I am now B2 in German and all the other foreigners in my company come to me with questions when they don't understand or need help in German, how strange.

Remember, this only happens if you play your cards right;)

Your question is ambiguous. Otherwise, I cannot explain the responses of my fellow commenters that hint at a career as a translator or even as a teacher. I will assume that you are looking for a career opportunity in your profession, whatever it may be.

The chances of finding a job in your profession, if you have one, are certainly greater if you know German (at least at level B2, but rather at C1, which will take you approximately 1-2 years of intensive study and most likely you will need to move). to Germany at some point around level B2 at the latest.) However, the language alone doesn't do much, if at all. It is a wide

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Your question is ambiguous. Otherwise, I cannot explain the responses of my fellow commenters that hint at a career as a translator or even as a teacher. I will assume that you are looking for a career opportunity in your profession, whatever it may be.

The chances of finding a job in your profession, if you have one, are certainly greater if you know German (at least at level B2, but rather at C1, which will take you approximately 1-2 years of intensive study and you will most likely have to move). to Germany at some point around level B2 at the latest.) However, the language alone doesn't do much, if at all. It is a general illusion that one alone or first has to learn German and then things will get better. It is a skill that is sought and if you can put a little cream on your ability to be able to communicate in German, perfect. But don't put the cart before the horse.

And before you think about working here, get familiar with the culture. It can be quite shocking to land here and realize that things are quite different than in your country. Since you seem to have living and working here for several years in mind, that could put a lot of pressure on you and also make learning the language much more difficult as you will develop internal resistance. That may not matter at the lower levels, but to get to B2, but certainly C1, you need to feel some love for the country, the language, and the people. Exceptions prove the rule;) But "haters" certainly have a harder time learning German than "lovers". Just say.

Whatever you decide, I wish you success.

#learngerman #work #work #Germany

Fast answer:

It will be difficult, especially if you are not:

a) educated to the minimum bachelor's degree level in a STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) profession, or;

b) a technical / professional expert with years of work experience in a specific occupation for which Germany has a shortage of workers. Even then, Germans are not guaranteed to recognize your qualifications.

I have developed a short 10 minute quiz that you can download here to help you understand how good your chances are.

Longer answer:

It depends on the type of job you are looking for. It is relati

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Fast answer:

It will be difficult, especially if you are not:

a) educated to the minimum bachelor's degree level in a STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) profession, or;

b) a technical / professional expert with years of work experience in a specific occupation for which Germany has a shortage of workers. Even then, Germans are not guaranteed to recognize your qualifications.

I have developed a short 10 minute quiz that you can download here to help you understand how good your chances are.

Longer answer:

It depends on the type of job you are looking for. It is relatively easy to find unskilled work, especially bar / restaurant waiters, logistics / warehouse operators. But again, how are you going to get a visa for this type of work? Many EU citizens and asylum seekers already in Germany could do these jobs.

This is not Amsterdam, Dubai or Singapore ...

My best advice to give here would be to approach this pragmatically and assess your current situation based on these factors and tips.

Yes, Germany has the lowest unemployment since reunification. But for every English speaking job, there will be a high demand unless it is an extremely rare and sought after skill. It should also be noted that many young Germans have lived abroad as part of their studies or their first years of professional careers, so the country does not exactly have a shortage of native speakers of English.

You are also more likely to seek "off the beaten track" opportunities for success than to speculatively apply to well-known companies that have an overtly English hiring policy.

Depends on paper and industry

Some industries and types of jobs are, by nature, less dependent on language skills.

You are less likely to need to be fluent in German if you work as a programmer or software engineer than if you work in a customer-facing or customer-facing role such as Sales and Marketing, dealing primarily with German-speaking customers.

It goes without saying that any position that requires more communication and interaction skills with external clients, clients and suppliers will be more difficult to achieve if you do not speak the native language of the country you are in.

It depends on the size of the company

Large multinationals are more likely to adopt English as an international business language. This not only applies to foreign companies, but also to some larger German companies.

Midsize family businesses are much less likely to offer jobs in English, although ironically these are the same businesses that struggle the most with a skills gap for essential vacancies.

It depends on the age of the position

This is possibly the most critical factor.

The general rule of thumb is: the higher the position, the less important it is to master German, especially in foreign-owned multinational companies.

Why is this?

Higher-level positions tend to be performed in a more international environment. If the company is multinational, these positions will interact with their peers in many different countries rather than in a single production plant or local headquarters.

Additionally, roles that are team leader or department head positions and come with direct reporting also reduce the need to be able to 'swim' on your own in a foreign environment, if you have native speakers as team members who can help in any situation where your lack of language skills may be insufficient.

It depends on your experience

Maybe I'm stating the obvious here, but it will be easier for an experienced candidate to land an English-speaking job than for a recent college graduate.

This is a "buyer's market." There are many more candidates than English speaking positions. English-speaking jobs are in high demand because there are many well-educated international job seekers in Germany who are not (yet) fluent in German.

You will see a reasonable number of entry-level positions advertised, especially in industries that require English speakers to deal with the international market or that can operate in an English-speaking environment. The key here, however, is that employers will generally want to see some relevant qualifications and work experience, and thus the market is tough for recent graduates with little practical experience on their CVs.

Get an edge on the competition!

Do your best to look where your competition is not looking.

I'm not saying don't apply AT ALL for any position you see on LinkedIn and co, but certainly don't follow this as your only strategy. Because I can guarantee that everyone else is looking there because they are the most obvious places.

Your network is your net worth

Everyone has a valuable network of contacts, even if they don't realize it. Look beyond your "obvious" contacts. Who else do you know who can help you? Maybe they know someone, who knows someone, who can connect you.

This is what is known as a dormant network - a "dormant" network, which you may not even know exists, but which has the potential to be extremely powerful in your search.

Some examples ... definitely a non-exhaustive list.

  • Your former college professor or tutor
  • Fellow alumni who may have contacts in Germany
  • Friends / family of your partner
  • Any German friends or followers you may have on social media.
  • Your tandem partner in German

Talk to international headhunting companies

Admittedly, this is geared more towards specialized and managerial positions than entry-level positions. However, contacting a well-known headhunting company that also has operations in Germany will give you access to a very valuable network of contacts.

If your skill set and experience appeal to them, THEY will do the hard work for you because there is a hefty commission for them. A classic win-win situation!

The headhunting / executive search industry tends to be quite industry specific, except for a few generalists like Michael Page, who seem to cover most areas. LinkedIn's search feature is your friend here in identifying headhunters in your profession or industry. Take about 30 minutes to type in different keywords in your search, for example, "Pharmacy jobs in Frankfurt". You will soon have an idea of ​​who is in the game and what positions are advertised in English.

My advice:

Increase your knowledge of the German language to at least level B1 before thinking about making the switch. Formulate your specific strategy, have a professional look through your CV, find someone to advise you with job applications, and don't look where others look.

You can't go wrong. I have studied both, taught French for years, and traveled in both French and German. Both are large and important languages ​​in Europe. French is one of the three official languages ​​used in North America, along with English and Spanish. Furthermore, French is widely used in Africa, and it is also used to some extent on all continents and on scattered islands in the Indian and Pacific oceans, although it is less important in Southeast Asia than it used to be. German is widely used in central and eastern Europe.

I think they are equally difficult to learn to pronounce.

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You can't go wrong. I have studied both, taught French for years, and traveled in both French and German. Both are large and important languages ​​in Europe. French is one of the three official languages ​​used in North America, along with English and Spanish. Furthermore, French is widely used in Africa, and it is also used to some extent on all continents and on scattered islands in the Indian and Pacific oceans, although it is less important in Southeast Asia than it used to be. German is widely used in central and eastern Europe.

I think they are equally difficult to learn to pronounce. They both have r sounds that are unlike anything in English; both have rounded vowels, which are a challenge for English speakers; German has the ich and ach sounds that English lacks, and the rhythms of French are quite different from English or German.

In grammar, French verbs are more complicated with more tenses and conjugated forms than German, while in German the pronouns, nouns and adjectives are more complicated because their form and the form of their articles change depending on whether they are used in a sentence as subject, direct object, indirect or possessive object. Many German nouns also have irregular plurals.

English is a Germanic language and shows its relationship with German in many basic words, such as licht 'light,' Sonne 'sun,' Mond 'moon,' Stern 'star,' Hand, Finger, Fuss' foot, 'Haar' hair.' However, English actually has a lot of vocabulary in common with French, because the Norman French conquered England in 1066 and imposed their vocabulary on government, war, abstract thinking, and many other areas.

The German language has many benefits. There are many reasons for the reasons for learning German. I like it, it has an interesting cultural, academic and technological heritage, 5 reasons why you should learn to speak German.

Reasons to learn German:

  1. Most widely spoken native language in Europe: German is the official language in / Austria, Belgium, Germany and the Principality / of Liechtenstein, Luxembourg and Switzerland.
  2. It has a great cultural heritage and its contribution to knowledge is priceless: it is the land of poets and thinkers. The German-speaking population has contributed profoundly to lit
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The German language has many benefits. There are many reasons for the reasons for learning German. I like it, it has an interesting cultural, academic and technological heritage, 5 reasons why you should learn to speak German.

Reasons to learn German:

  1. Most widely spoken native language in Europe: German is the official language in / Austria, Belgium, Germany and the Principality / of Liechtenstein, Luxembourg and Switzerland.
  2. It has a great cultural heritage and its contribution to knowledge is priceless: it is a land of poets and thinkers. The German-speaking population has contributed deeply to literature and the arts. Mastering the German language will allow you to read classics of literature, philosophy and the social and exact sciences in your own language.
  3. Excellent business opportunities: German is the second most used language in science. Germany is the third largest contributor to research and offers places to study postdoctoral studies for international scientists. Germany is the third largest economy in the world, it is global market leading corporations such as Audi, Siemens, Volkswagen, Adidas, Lufthansa. Some even call Berlin the "Silicon Valley" of Europe.
  4. Study at reputable German universities: Germany offers numerous scholarships through the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) for undergraduate and postgraduate studies at top German universities in various disciplines. In addition, international students, as well as domestic students, must pay a surprisingly low university enrollment fee, which is sometimes non-existent.
  5. It is not that difficult to learn German: German is part of the West Germanic language group, it shares many similarities with the English language. You can relate them to English vocabulary, for example. Wasser is water, the chin is Kinn and Vater is the father.

Its benefits are:

  • Opportunities for educational trips
  • An opportunity to study in Germany
  • Get to know the culture, values, etc. from the country
  • international platform to settle (personally or professionally)
  • An opportunity to live and work abroad.
  • A promise of an upper-class education.
  • More career opportunities on the horizon

It is not probable. If you already live here with a residence permit that allows you to work, you may find yourself getting a menial job, like stocking shelves or delivering newspapers. And yes, there are some really specialized fields, like IT jobs, where English will suffice. But 95% of the jobs will require a good German.

You actually need to know a level of English for some professional jobs, but generally in addition, rather than being an alternative to German. And many, like being a lawyer or a doctor, are legally required to have a C1 level, others like nurses and physiotherapists will need B1 or B2. And almost all college programs

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It is not probable. If you already live here with a residence permit that allows you to work, you may find yourself getting a menial job, like stocking shelves or delivering newspapers. And yes, there are some really specialized fields, like IT jobs, where English will suffice. But 95% of the jobs will require a good German.

You actually need to know a level of English for some professional jobs, but generally in addition, rather than being an alternative to German. And many, like being a lawyer or a doctor, are legally required to have a C1 level, others like nurses and physiotherapists will need B1 or B2. And almost all university programs taught in German (most of them) will require C1.

Therefore, even other EU / Schengen citizens who do not need a work permit per se will not get a job due to lack of knowledge of the German language.

I often see claims that there are a lot of jobs for English speakers, but statistically it's delusional; limited to a few small niches.

Writing this answer based purely on my own experiences. In short, finding a job in Germany is difficult and not knowing German makes it more difficult. But it is not impossible, given that the candidate has the right skills and the right attitude towards the job. I had a colleague at university, with mostly average grades, no practical experience of any kind, B1 in German and a good conceptual knowledge of the subject. He found a job within a month of looking for it. The interview he gave was entirely in English, and now just half a year later he is speaking in German. The second person made his teacher, then d

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Writing this answer based purely on my own experiences. In short, finding a job in Germany is difficult and not knowing German makes it more difficult. But it is not impossible, given that the candidate has the right skills and the right attitude towards the job. I had a colleague at university, with mostly average grades, no practical experience of any kind, B1 in German and a good conceptual knowledge of the subject. He found a job within a month of looking for it. The interview he gave was entirely in English, and now just half a year later he is speaking in German. The second person did his master's degree, then did an internship for 6 months and a thesis for 6 months from a renowned international firm. His scores were also average and he had B1 in German (but due to 1 year of work in an English company he almost forgot). After applying to a couple of firms, he received multiple offers from many large firms for full-time positions. Therefore, by having the right attitude and skills, it is possible to find a job in Germany :) once you find a job, you can focus on bringing your German skills to the level you want! All the best :) You can focus on bringing your German skills to the level you want! All the best :) You can focus on bringing your German skills to the level you want! All the best :)

I had the same question myself before emigrating. I tried hard for that too. Here is my opinion. The easiest thing would be to get a work permit from a company that you have here. That would help in immigration later on, as we get extra points for that. I applied for more than 50 companies from India. I received 2 responses. I had attended 2 Skype interviews, but the response was "get in touch once we land, if there is openness, you may consider"

In order for someone to get a job from outside, companies must show that such a job description cannot be completed by local hiring and only someone

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I had the same question myself before emigrating. I tried hard for that too. Here is my opinion. The easiest thing would be to get a work permit from a company that you have here. That would help in immigration later on, as we get extra points for that. I applied for more than 50 companies from India. I received 2 responses. I had attended 2 Skype interviews, but the response was "get in touch once we land, if there is openness, you may consider"

For someone to get a job from outside, companies must show that such a job description cannot be completed through local hiring and only someone with your expertise in skill set X can. That is quite a tedious process that no company wants to go through.

Here, most of the recruiting is done through agency / consultant / friend referrals and all require your presence in person for a face-to-face meeting. With so much fraudulent activity in terms of fake interviews, fake candidates, representatives attending interviews for another, the credibility of the candidate is under scrutiny in most cases.

I am not saying that it is impossible to get a job offer from India, just that the chances are less and your resume should stand out for having such an opportunity.

Assuming you have the legal right to work there, it depends on your skills, education, and experience just like anywhere else. Also, what you are willing to do. If you are not basically skilled, you may only find low-paying jobs, such as working a cash register in a store or restaurant. And it is understandable that one is reluctant to take such a job if he thinks he can do better. But practically anyone can get a job of some kind.

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