What is the easiest job to get on Facebook or Google and why?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Thomas Dixon



What is the easiest job to get on Facebook or Google and why?

You need to define it easily.

One definition (and the reason people say that it is difficult to get a job) is that a small proportion of the people who are applying for the job do. However, the barrier to applying is very low; It costs nothing, which is why many people apply; You hear it said that it's easier to get into Harvard than to get a job at Google, but that's only because people don't. apply to Harvard, because you have to pay.

A second definition is the job you are most likely to get. I don't know what that is, because I don't know you. I know what is the easiest job for me to get in Goo

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You need to define it easily.

One definition (and the reason people say that it is difficult to get a job) is that a small proportion of the people who are applying for the job do. However, the barrier to applying is very low; It costs nothing, which is why many people apply; You hear it said that it's easier to get into Harvard than to get a job at Google, but that's only because people don't. apply to Harvard, because you have to pay.

A second definition is the job you are most likely to get. I don't know what that is, because I don't know you. I know the easiest job for me to get on Google is the one I have, and I don't think there are many other jobs I can do, but that's probably not true for you.

Take a look at Build for Everyone - Google Careers - there are jobs for teachers, designers, lawyers, accountants, linguists, doctors, nurses, and writers. All those jobs are hard to come by.

Then there are a lot of people who work at Google but who are not Google employees. Cleaning, maintenance, catering, valet staff. They may be easier for some people.

Google tends to attract a lot of people from Infosys and Cognizant. You can find jobs easier by looking at Cognizant listings: Search Results | Find available openings on Cognizant.

I worked for Google for about 4 years and from my experience, being interviewed for roles at Google many times, both before my employment at Google and afterwards, for different roles while working there, I can say that there are many factors that influence the decision. of hiring someone for a position and sometimes they are not fair. Here are some factors that many people are unaware of.

1 - Does Google hire the smartest people?

No. I can say that Google's hiring process is most of the time very efficient and they do not hire the smartest people, but the most suitable for a certain position.

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I worked for Google for about 4 years and from my experience, being interviewed for roles at Google many times, both before my employment at Google and afterwards, for different roles while working there, I can say that there are many factors that influence the decision. of hiring someone for a position and sometimes they are not fair. Here are some factors that many people are unaware of.

1 - Does Google hire the smartest people?

No. I can say that Google's hiring process is most of the time very efficient and they do not hire the smartest people, but the most suitable for a certain role. They are really smart. It's not just about your knowledge and skills, it's also about how well you perform in that position.

2 - Is the Google interview process very difficult?

Yes and No. It depends. It will depend on the interviewer, recruiter and how long the position has been open, how quickly they need someone for the position, and the skills of other candidates. Some interviewers want to hire a copy of themselves and in this case, no matter how good you are, if you don't share the same style and personality as the hiring manager, you won't get the job.

3 - Most of the time they have someone in mind for the role.

I can explain that in more detail later, but at Google they need to interview multiple people for a position. Sometimes they loved the first candidate and when you showed up for the interview they already fell in love with someone else. However, they are still obliged to interview the other candidates and sometimes they will do it very badly because they see it as a waste of time. In cases like that, you will probably walk out of the interview feeling like you won't get the job.

4 - Are you always looking to hire the best candidate?

Not always. There are a lot of insider recommendations for roles, and unless the person someone referred you is really bad and you're incredibly good at what you do, chances are you won't get the role.

Google is the company where I saw the highest number of Googlers friends, husbands, wives, boyfriends, girlfriends, brothers and sisters hired. In my team, at least 25% of the people have a family member or someone very close who works at Google.

5 - Heart rate can be very lazy

You have to think in terms of supply and demand to understand the recruitment process at Google. They have hundreds, sometimes thousands of people applying for a position on Google. They don't need to scout for talent (although most of the time they do), they already have millions of people wanting to work for them.

For that reason, recruiters are sometimes really disorganized and don't care much about you and can't send you enough information that you will need to perform well in the interview.

But that is not the rule. I believe that most of the time they do a decent job and in their defense they receive thousands of applications a month, 95% of the time from people who are not suitable for the position.

6 - You need to be lucky

I have a friend at Google who said that his technical interview questions were very similar to the questions he had been practicing in a book on technical interview questions. He was fortunate to be prepared to answer all the questions correctly and faster. I know another guy who is really normal, but who worked with a Googler at an agency and when a position became available they recommended him for the position.

You have to keep in mind that the hiring process in Google is not perfect. I think there is a lot of decision-making power in the hiring manager's hand.

7 - There are many average people

One thing you hear a lot during your first few months at Google is about imposter syndrome. Google has amazing people working for them and some of the brightest people I had the pleasure of working with I met at Google. However, there are also many average people. What you don't see is anyone below average. Everyone has at least enough skills to do a reasonable job. I think Google is good at providing a fertile environment for personal growth. It also challenges you to keep improving, but still, there are some folks who are happy enough to be on Google and not worried about improvement.

8 - Non-technical roles

Non-technical roles are the most difficult because it is difficult to establish the correct success metrics for a candidate. Technical roles are easier because 70% of the process is to show that you have great skills and your methods to solve a problem.

When it comes to non-technical roles it is very easy to get a false positive. It's not hard to cheat the process if you're really good at interviewing or the hiring manager isn't very skilled either. I worked for a large, well-known company where the team leader was not really trained and unprepared for his role, but his manager (the department director) was also untrained and unprepared. So if you're applying for a position where hiring managers are bad at what they do, chances are they will hire someone just as bad as they are. In my case, I was hired because someone else with great influence in the company decided that I was the right candidate.

9 - Googleness

You hear a lot about Googleness, but I think that as long as you don't do something really awkward or unprofessional during the interview, Googleness isn't that important. Googleness is a "metric" that shows how apt you are to work in the Google environment.

Practice data structures and algorithms safely. I got a job offer from Google Warsaw right out of college. I mostly credit my experience of participating in many coding contests for that, as it helped me develop great problem-solving acumen. I will post my Google interview experience here:

I contacted a recruiter I knew to schedule full-time SWE interviews.

I had my first round online in October 2018. I was asked an easy tree problem and I was able to do it in 30 minutes. We then discussed how we could parallelize some of the parts of my solution for the same problem and t

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Practice data structures and algorithms safely. I got a job offer from Google Warsaw right out of college. I mostly credit my experience of participating in many coding contests for that, as it helped me develop great problem-solving acumen. I will post my Google interview experience here:

I contacted a recruiter I knew to schedule full-time SWE interviews.

I had my first round online in October 2018. I was asked an easy tree problem and I was able to do it in 30 minutes. We then discussed how we could parallelize some of the parts of my solution to the same problem and the interview concluded.

My second round online was in November 2018. If I remember correctly, it was about finding a way in a BST. We discuss the case in multiple ways, etc. and then I was able to find a semi-optimal solution. My interviewer gave me a hint and I was able to find the optimal solution and code it way ahead of time. I made it through this round and was invited for on-site interviews in London.

My on-site interviews took place in December 2018. In fact, I went to the wrong Google office in the morning! But since I left early, I had some extra time, so I ran to the right office and was able to arrive at the last minute. He was supposed to have 4 algorithmic interviews and a Googliness interview.

My first interviewer showed me the office. Then the rounds of interviews began.

For my first round I was asked a medium difficulty bit manipulation question. This round was pretty good and I was able to finish the round 5 minutes early.

For my second round they asked me a graphic question. I explained my solution and they asked me to write the code to build just the graph instead of solving the whole question. This round also went quite well.

Next, I had the googliness round. It's basically a behavioral round, so they asked me questions like what are my expectations when working at Google, what criteria do I use to prioritize projects, etc. This round was meh because I don't have a lot of work experience so I was only able to give slightly vague answers to questions. But I wasn't too worried because I think it's an experimental round that only happens in some Google offices (London is one of them).

I had my lunch break, ate light.

The third round was the hardest. It was a graphic question about permutation rings. It took me a bit of time to find the solution and I wasn't really sure about it. But the interviewer said my test was fine, so I coded it. I had 1-2 trivial errors that I fixed after the interviewer pointed them out. I think this was my strongest round as tough questions can go a long way in distinguishing algorithmic ability and my competitive programming background helped a lot here.

The fourth round was based on trees and basic probability. It was easy-medium and I was able to code without any errors so this round went well too.

After the new year I got a call from my recruiter saying that my interview scores were good enough to move on to the host search phase. In this phase, my recruiter basically tried to find a team on Google for me. I was paired with the Google Cloud team in Warsaw and got my offer in April.

As you can see, most of my rounds were based on data structures and algorithms, so my experience in programming competition helped a lot in clearing these rounds.

I recommend that you start entering coding contests right away. To get started, look at some of my answers:

Sameer Gulati's answer to How should I get started in competitive programming?

Sameer Gulati's answer to What made you good at competitive programming?

About 2-3 months before the interview, switch to troubleshooting at Leetcode, CareerCup, etc. to gain experience in solving interview problems. Having a little experience in competitive programming will make solving these problems much easier for you.

Got a job at Google twice. I had to go through full cycles of Software Engineering interviews both times. I worked there for the first time between 2006 and 2012. I recently returned in February 2017.

If you knew me from my upbringing, you could consider me "normal":

  • I grew up in a small house in the woods in a semi-rural town at the end of a gravel road. My parents and a brother still live in that house. Until I was a teenager, there was an RV on the property that faced the street. I used to run barefoot through the woods and catch snakes and frogs to entertain myself.
  • I have a 100% public school educa
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Got a job at Google twice. I had to go through full cycles of Software Engineering interviews both times. I worked there for the first time between 2006 and 2012. I recently returned in February 2017.

If you knew me from my upbringing, you could consider me "normal":

  • I grew up in a small house in the woods in a semi-rural town at the end of a gravel road. My parents and a brother still live in that house. Until I was a teenager, there was an RV on the property that faced the street. I used to run barefoot through the woods and catch snakes and frogs to entertain myself.
  • I have a 100% public school education from elementary school to university. K-12 was all in Louisiana, a state consistently ranked in the lowest 5 states in the United States for quality of public education, literacy, obesity, teen pregnancy, incarceration rate, etc.
  • Neither of my parents had prestigious professions. My father has a semester of college education and is self-employed. My mother is a retired public school teacher with a degree in education from the University of New Orleans. Each of them valued education and instilled in me the value of hard work.
  • There is no wealth in my family tree. Just ordinary middle-class working people. I am the first in my family to leave the state for education or employment. In fact, I am the first man in my paternal line who has not been incarcerated in his life. (But hey, there's still time, right?)
  • As a child, my friend's father, who worked in a managerial position at a Fortune 500 company, took me and his son to a monster truck rally to which he got free tickets. This is where I think the professionals in my community placed me because of my education: red collar. The trucks were really big and very loud, but they are not what inspired me to become an engineer.
  • I spent my teenage summers working with my father cleaning carpets to save enough money for my first car. I spent some of that money building a computer and buying a broadband internet connection for our home (this was in the mid 90's).
  • I have a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from Texas A&M, which is in the top 50 computer science schools in the nation. Certainly not Ivy League. It was the best school I could afford.
  • I paid my own way through college with the help of a modest scholarship. I did not join a fraternity, study abroad, or get involved with student government or other social clubs. I did an internship at Hewlett-Packard and IBM.
  • My college GPA was 3.4. Not bad, but far from exceptional. I think I got a 3.6 GPA in Computer Science courses with a C in Algorithms and a C in Operating Systems.
  • Despite working at major tech companies for over a decade, I still have trouble "fitting in" socially. I enjoy fishing, hunting, and professional soccer, which I don't generally speak to at the office. I attend church every Sunday. I have no idea what the latest menswear is. Never has.

Aside from finishing college, I think I have more in common with the average American than the average Silicon Valley citizen.

So to answer your question: yes. A normal person can get a job at Google. (Sometimes twice, which shows it's not random or fluke, right?) A normal person can also get jobs at Facebook, Amazon, and Microsoft (I've received offers from all of these). A normal person can also rise to the top. start-ups (I've worked at elite VC-backed companies in their early stages and most recently on Pinterest). Yes, these companies are littered with Ivy League graduates and top engineering schools. They don't know what to think of me, but they certainly respect my work.

A normal person can get these jobs, but they will have to work harder to get the chance. A normal person will not have an extremely successful and educated family that encourages them to excel in school. No one is going to pay for SAT tutoring and college application consulting. Not having connections with alumni means that it is more difficult to get into prestigious institutions. Not having family money means having to choose public schools over private ones. An average state school means that major companies cannot hire staff from that campus. A normal person will lack the family connections to obtain internship opportunities and guaranteed interview spaces at major companies.

As a normal person, the opportunities are still there. It's just that no one catches their eye. Or if they do, they imply that you are unlikely to be able to take advantage of those opportunities. The opportunities are still there. YOU need to find them. YOU need to get hold of them. To do that, you will have to put in a lot of effort.

"Hard work" means different things for different income levels. Where I grew up, it meant something like showing up every day on time no matter what and doing dirty work without complaining. For a couple of doctors' children, "hard work" may mean earning the final degree in their profession of choice, becoming a fair but tough employer, negotiating the things that matter, and always looking presentable and behaving in a distinguished manner.

Ironically, doing the dirty work without complaining is what led to my quick promotion within Google my first time. We'll see where it takes me this time. Google's engineering interview processes and advocacy processes don't care about how you dress, who your parents are, or what Greek organization you're affiliated with. They are a brutally honest assessment of how well you know and apply your craft.

Success can be fostered. In the absence of nurturing, a normal person can still achieve old-fashioned success. That's the very essence of the American Dream: work hard and the opportunity will come. Success can be achieved in this country no matter what your initial circumstances are. Anyone who tells you otherwise is trying to rob you.

Applying for a position at Google (engineering or otherwise) is relatively easy - getting that first interview is the hardest part. Fewer than 1-2% of applicants get telephone interviews, and only one-tenth of all applicants selected by phone get one on the spot.

But to answer your question, how do you apply?

  1. Google Careers -> Go to Google Careers and search for the specific job you want to apply for. Remember to filter as much as possible; Right now, there are over 2,500 software engineering jobs available, but looks can be deceiving. How many of those are already full? How many of them are not based on the co
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Applying for a position at Google (engineering or otherwise) is relatively easy - getting that first interview is the hardest part. Fewer than 1-2% of applicants get telephone interviews, and only one-tenth of all applicants selected by phone get one on the spot.

But to answer your question, how do you apply?

  1. Google Careers -> Go to Google Careers and search for the specific job you want to apply for. Remember to filter as much as possible; Right now, there are over 2,500 software engineering jobs available, but looks can be deceiving. How many of those are already full? How many of them are not based in the country where you want to work? How many of those software engineering roles are specifically tailored to your skills and experiences? Considering factors like these, there will be a few select positions that you will focus on.
  2. References -> As with any company, having references from current full-time employees will always help you get interviews. If you can't get an internal referral, find an employee who may be interested in a specific skill you possess. If they think you are a good fit for their team, they will connect you with a suitable recruiter. Conference websites, forums, LinkedIn profiles, blog posts, Twitter feeds, Facebook posts, and even Instagram photos are good places to look.
  3. BE REMARKABLE -> There are literally 1,999 million other applicants who are just as smart / skilled as you are. So how do you stand out? Of many ways!
  • Create your own website, write or create content to increase your visibility in search engines, comment and write about events relevant to your fields of interest, engage all users (one of them could even be a recruiter) and make it easy to funnel your online presence to your website / online portfolio. This brings me to the next point ->
  • Show your technical skills -> Upload your personal projects to GitHub, Kaggle, Codepen.io, etc. Summarize your technical internships / work experiences in 2-3 points on your CV.
  • Your school and your GPA are important, but your personal projects and your work experience will take you to the top.
    • When recruiters screen potential Google employees, they look at 1) how much impact did the project have on their community? 2) Did others use it? Was it useful enough for other people to adopt it? 3) Was the project you worked on relevant to your field of interest? 4) How passionate are you about creating side projects (passion can be measured by how deeply you created them)? 5) Can Google see that their software is used in Google products?
    • In other words, your project must be truly unique, have a lot of effort invested in it, display your technical knowledge, and be valuable enough for others to use. Creating a generic chess AI or stock prediction model may not be enough.

A2A.

It is quite challenging. I interviewed for a data scientist position in 2018. They were very helpful back then by sending me lots of materials to review on Facebook products, YouTube videos on their executives' speeches on product development, and even a link to a SQL tutorial. (I had the option to select SQL, Python, or R for the coding interview, so I settled on SQL.) They also mentioned that they will treat me as an expert on the subject, so questions to the interviewer, while not discouraged, should implicitly be kept to a minimum.

The interview was online via the live dash, wh

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A2A.

It is quite challenging. I interviewed for a data scientist position in 2018. They were very helpful back then by sending me lots of materials to review on Facebook products, YouTube videos on their executives' speeches on product development, and even a link to a SQL tutorial. (I had the option to select SQL, Python, or R for the coding interview, so I settled on SQL.) They also mentioned that they will treat me as an expert on the subject, so questions to the interviewer, while not discouraged, should implicitly be kept to a minimum.

The interview was online through the live dashboard, where the interviewer could see what he was writing. They wanted me to think out loud, as the results weren't as important as my way of thinking.

I won't go into the details of the questions, but they gave me a database, simple enough, and asked questions that I could answer with the data from that database. The questions started with easy questions and the last one was quite difficult, engaging my creativity in a field other than data science (I met a Facebook employee at a conference later that year and asked her how she would approach this question. Turns out, I was very close, but there was another component that I did not include in my answer). I didn't get the job at the time, but they encouraged me to apply again.

A friend of mine, a data scientist with 20 years of experience, had the option of interviewing Google (recommended by a former employee) and IBM. Chose IBM as they offered a better package and higher role than Google, but also a complexity of the Google interview played the role. As you learned from conversations with others, coding interviews are long and you really need to know all the algorithms (included in the so-called CLR book).

It all depends on the role, but probably Google and Facebook are one of the most difficult to hire among the FAANG companies (Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix, Google).

First let me start by saying that I worked at Facebook as a contractor. During the 2 years I was there, I saw people interview weekly. Some weeks they had 2-3 interviews and some weeks they had one.

Almost ALL external "walk-ins / unknown" candidates were rejected.

My department relied on contractors from two suppliers. Most of the time, only contractors became employees, but only after 2-4 years of service.

Some contractors who had extraordinary performance, such as working 12-15 hours a day, converted perhaps just after 1 year. However, 95% of the others were not. Even in this case, they had co

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First let me start by saying that I worked at Facebook as a contractor. During the 2 years I was there, I saw people interview weekly. Some weeks they had 2-3 interviews and some weeks they had one.

Almost ALL external "walk-ins / unknown" candidates were rejected.

My department relied on contractors from two suppliers. Most of the time, only contractors became employees, but only after 2-4 years of service.

Some contractors who had extraordinary performance, such as working 12-15 hours a day, converted perhaps just after 1 year. However, 95% of the others were not. Even in this case, they had competitive bids and if FB hadn't bid soon they could leave.

A couple of walk-ins were asked to take a step or two down as they joined in from outside. FB managers and recruiters want to hear from candidates that “I believe in your partner. and I'll take a step down and then prove that I can move up. "They want you to work harder that way. However, most CIs who joined full-time were rarely promoted. Promotions occurred between 6 and 8 months after he joined or after 3.5 years, when almost all the shares were acquired and there was a chance he might be leaving soon.

  1. So your options are, enter as a contractor, prove yourself for 2 to 4 years.

2. Have Harvard or Stanford on your resume or a Ph.D.

3. Have an influential IN, a former manager or director who is at that level in FB and who answers for you.

4. Being a senior manager or director in another company and willing to step down.

Another way that I can suggest and it might work is:

Play hard - get a competitive offer from Google, MSFT, AMZN, or UBER and report it to the recruiter. They think that if you are good enough for these companies, you are good enough for FB. They will fight for you.

Generally, FB, Google, and UBER will not make you an offer unless you have a competitive offer from their similar company.

Amazon or MSFT are not distinguished like this.

Except for this, like 95-99% of other candidates, it will be rejected.

I interviewed on Google and found it to be a very easy technical interview. (This was for a contract position. In those where an older man does all the work so the children can play).

Later, I heard that I was the only one of the candidates who passed the interview.

But I heard this because a guy was hell-bent on getting fired for so many damaging reasons. So, he scolded the people who interviewed me. And one of them was fired. The guy who was fired was a Ukrainian and Indian managers suggested that it was bad practice to let a Ukrainian do interviews.

So the Indian manager, w

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I interviewed on Google and found it to be a very easy technical interview. (This was for a contract position. In those where an older man does all the work so the children can play).

Later, I heard that I was the only one of the candidates who passed the interview.

But I heard this because a guy was hell-bent on getting fired for so many damaging reasons. So, he scolded the people who interviewed me. And one of them was fired. The guy who was fired was a Ukrainian and Indian managers suggested that it was bad practice to let a Ukrainian do interviews.

So the Indian manager, who was busy getting his hiring company to take over all the positions of another hiring company, took over the interview process. He hired another American to take my place and then fired that guy when the guy suggested to the Indian that he was some kind of control freak with bad attitude and behavior. After that, only boys were hired in Bombay. And all the contractors in the room were replaced by guys from Bombay. But before there was diversity.

So, it turns out, to get hired at Google, you don't have to be good at coding at all. In fact, you should have a habit of messing up projects badly.

But you have to be born into a group of families that come from Bombay and are very rich even if they will never have a job at Google.

In fact, one of the Indian managers, a lady, complained that I was not wearing Armatti shoes. That was a blow to me, as well as doing all the work that Bombay-born and raised children preferred to find too troublesome to deal with.

So basically this is clear advice for your hopes about these companies.

These companies are country clubs for wealthy children who, because of their birthplace, are entitled to well-paying positions and the claim to experience.

This is not totally tied to some kind of Brahmin Indian supremism. There are also other groups that pretend to be in these companies.

However, you will notice that some racial or ethnic types are extremely underrepresented in these companies. For example, the United States government took money from American taxpayers and spent it on training centers in India. But they did not build training centers in areas of the United States where there are many migrant farm workers from Mexico. Despite this, many of our Mexicans are considerably better trained than the wealthy Bombay kids who work in places similar to Google. However, you won't see any of the Mexicans walking around on technical jobs. (I met some Mexican kids from San José who make a joke about getting a job at Google. They'll just give you a mop and broom.)

So if you are from any country and you strive to learn. You must keep in mind that innovation is what eventually beats bigotry and self-adulation.

So as these companies focus on the mundane and dilute the work for those they are entitled to, they will start to decline. In the meantime, you can do something cool among other discounted people.

Sadly, these companies get a large chunk of money and government help to pay privileged people money they don't deserve. The rest of us have less money to work with. And the government takes the money out of our hands. But this is the nature of socialism. If Google were nationalized, the very privileged and lazy would have the same money that the rest of us would not get. But, now, instead of having some narcissistic idiots tell us that the rest of us are no good, we would have the government saying this too. Without the socialist nationalization of such a company, we instead see a kind of fascism game. We must bear in mind that the difference between socialism and fascism has to do with how corporations are controlled by the government.

So for all the talk about how difficult it is to get into these companies. Keep in mind that you may not want to be with one of these companies. Also, you would not want to be in a country that could be controlled by one of these companies.

  • What he wants to do is create great technology for the rest of us to use.
  • What you want to do is create a support group around you that is made up of good people who are focused on working for the cause of humanity.
  • Human people for humanity.
  • Establish government out of goodness and banish government out of fear.
  • Backstabbing is not allowed.

So if you can figure out how to maintain that that would be nice.

Sometimes companies start out with a human purpose and then turn to Google or Apple, where it's more about money than the words they speak to the public. Don't forget that the Nazi party began with the goal of uplifting the common man. They were true socialists. So how can you maintain a good purpose and not become a Nazi? (Note: I think socialism is a configuration for fascism).

Perhaps the best way is to never have a large company or centralized government. So you can always keep changing the hill that people want to climb. The king of the hill game is always against developing the best in any case. However, the modern corporate structure establishes a game of king of the hill to incentivize its workers.

Once again: what you want to do is create great technology for the rest of us to use.

Yes, quite difficult. I applied for a job as a developer there earlier this year. I have ten years of experience in the software industry and a first-class honors graduate degree from one of the best universities in my country. I initially made a selection with their internal recruiter, which was only to confirm my interest and the details of the position and how it matched my experience. I carefully reviewed the algorithms throughout the process, which took around six weeks after the recruiter's call and consisted, first of all, of an hour-long interview and a coding test with the hiring manager. That

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Yes, quite difficult. I applied for a job as a developer there earlier this year. I have ten years of experience in the software industry and a first-class honors graduate degree from one of the best universities in my country. I initially made a selection with their internal recruiter, which was only to confirm my interest and the details of the position and how it matched my experience. I carefully reviewed the algorithms throughout the process, which took around six weeks after the recruiter's call and consisted, first of all, of an hour-long interview and a coding test with the hiring manager. That was difficult and I thought I hadn't done well enough, but I got the call the following week to attend the on-site event. I did that and it was about three hours of face-to-face interviews that included not one, but two coding tests. I evidently did not meet their high standard and was informed the following week that I was unsuccessful. Maybe with more time / concentration I could have been successful, but they didn't provide me with feedback, so I really don't know how far I was from the hiring bar.

I was accepted into Google on four different occasions and never rejected. I ended up working there twice as a software engineer. I applied to Facebook only once, but they rejected me.

Until now, Facebook was more difficult for me. But I think I was also unlucky with an interview question; a boy who seemed to be new to interviews gave me a problem on Facebook and then saw me struggle; I was speaking through my thought process, but got no clues, discussions, or anything. She just looked at me during the entire interview. It scared me a bit. I finally got out of it and answered the question.

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I was accepted into Google on four different occasions and never rejected. I ended up working there twice as a software engineer. I applied to Facebook only once, but they rejected me.

Until now, Facebook was more difficult for me. But I think I was also unlucky with an interview question; a boy who seemed to be new to interviews gave me a problem on Facebook and then saw me struggle; I was talking through my thought process, but got no clues, discussions, or anything. She just looked at me during the entire interview. It scared me a bit. Finally, I got out of it and answered the question correctly; It ended up boiling down to a kind of breadth search problem that wasn't bad in the end, but I was running short on time and she seemed annoyed with me. Other than that, my other 4 FB interviews went well that day; the recruiter confirmed that I scored high on most interviews, but had a black mark on the coding. Oh good.

However, those are not enough data points to really tell which one is more difficult! In general, I had more difficult interview questions on Google, but I got them right; even the problem that gave me problems in FB was not as difficult as others that I solved in Google.

It's kind of luck of the draw, and practice to make sure you perform consistently, I guess.

Amazon will fire you in the blink of an eye. It is a happy company with fire. It seems that he does not want to retain the talent. He hires a lot of people and makes a lot of people leave every few months. A lot of politics. There are some places worse than others. For example, the development centers of India are probably the worst in this regard. Work-life balance is a mess.

Facebook has a high bar to enter, but is not happy with the fire. As long as you keep moving forward and working, you are fine. However, there are many things to learn and deliver. You can expect a certain amount of work pressure.

Google is similar to F

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Amazon will fire you in the blink of an eye. It is a happy company with fire. It seems that he does not want to retain the talent. He hires a lot of people and makes a lot of people leave every few months. A lot of politics. There are some places worse than others. For example, the development centers of India are probably the worst in this regard. Work-life balance is a mess.

Facebook has a high bar to enter, but is not happy with the fire. As long as you keep moving forward and working, you are fine. However, there are many things to learn and deliver. You can expect a certain amount of work pressure.

Google is similar to Facebook when it comes to employee retention. There is a lot of exciting work to do and you can work at a decent pace. Often times the technology is unique and very specific. Work pressure is normal and a lot of smart people.

Microsoft has a good reputation as a decent workplace. He is not known for random shots. Employees are expected to have a good work-life balance and the company is huge and relatively traditional compared to others mentioned here.

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