What is the easiest job in the US military?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Kian Johnston



What is the easiest job in the US military?

Actually???

It all comes down to what your gifts and abilities are. In the Navy, I was an ABE (Aviation Petty Officer Team). It's not an easy job, but we work hard and we play hard. We work long hours in a very hot, dirty, greasy and very dangerous environment. Unlike many of the other job specialties on the ship, we do not work 12 in / 12 out. We consider ourselves lucky to see our shelf for a few hours every other day. Most of the time we sleep in some of the strangest places you can imagine. I served only 4 years in active duty, with another 7 years as a Naval Reservist. More than 30 years have passed

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Actually???

It all comes down to what your gifts and abilities are. In the Navy, I was an ABE (Aviation Petty Officer Team). It's not an easy job, but we work hard and we play hard. We work long hours in a very hot, dirty, greasy and very dangerous environment. Unlike many of the other job specialties on the ship, we do not work 12 in / 12 out. We consider ourselves lucky to see our shelf for a few hours every other day. Most of the time we sleep in some of the strangest places you can imagine. I served only 4 years in active duty, with another 7 years as a Naval Reservist. It's been more than 30 years since I got off that ship… Would I do it again if I could? In a moment, without thinking.

No, it was not "easy" and it never is.

I also served 8 years in the US Coast Guard as an Electronics Technician (ET). I was responsible for the AN / SPS-64 (V4) surface search radar. In addition, I was responsible for the Electronic Navigation Equipment installed on the bridge. Considering the different job description, the work environment was generally in air conditioning and long hours doing routine maintenance, troubleshooting and / or repairs on various electronic devices, such as radars, various radios (HF / VHF / UHF) , antenna systems and associated power lines. . I was also responsible for the maintenance and repair of the entire ship's entertainment system for the crew.

As with all the military, I also had my share of collateral duties in addition to my rate-specific duties (ie, job specialty). From Quarterdeck Watches standing as GPOW (Petty Officer of the Guard on the Catwalk) as Coast Guard, to Afterbrow Messenger or Security Steam Vigilante as Navy Airman or Non-commissioned Officer.

So, really, there is no "easier" job in the military. Each branch has different hazards associated with each and every job specialty. Remember, the primary mission of the US Armed Forces is to bring the battle to the enemy. The enemy will not stand still and say, "Kill me." They will also do their best to fight us and try to do the worst to our strength.

A typist clerk, in an office 50 miles from the front line, can be hit by missiles, planes, or even ground forces just as much as the grunt in the middle of battle. On a ship, each sailor is a firefighter and a damage control worker. In the battle, all are needed to fight the fires, repair the damage, save the ship, so that the ship can continue its mission to fight the enemy. Nobody has an easy job.

So if you are considering military service and looking for the easiest job ... my recommendation is to stay home. You are not what the military is looking for. We want entrepreneurs who are not only willing to go the extra mile, but who want to give it their all.

A Soldier / Sailor / Marine / Airman / Coast Guard is someone who has written a blank check payable to the American people, in any amount up to and including their own life.

Not for glory dogs or those looking for an easy way out.

ABEAN, USN
V-2 Div., Waist Cats, USS America (CV-66), 1980-1984
and
ABE3 (AW), USNR
NR VC-62 Det 0166, USS Independence (CV-62), 1984-1991

ET2, USCG
COMSTA NOLA,
USCGC Sherman (WHEC-720),
ESD St, Louis, MO
1991-1999, medically retired.

Thanks for the A2A. Sorry to sound trite. The easiest job in the US military is the one you volunteered to do.

Call me an idealist. I believe that everyone who joins the US military, for whatever secondary reason of personal gain, raises their hand and is aware when they take an oath of allegiance and obedience that they are the type of person called to service. No matter where you find those people, religious vocation, humanitarian work, yes, even political, there is a certain character of service (perhaps more difficult to find in some ...) that shines through and makes it easier to do what it seems.

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Thanks for the A2A. Sorry to sound trite. The easiest job in the US military is the one you volunteered to do.

Call me an idealist. I believe that everyone who joins the US military, for whatever secondary reason of personal gain, raises their hand and is aware when they take an oath of allegiance and obedience that they are the type of person called to service. No matter where you find those people, religious vocation, humanitarian work, yes, even political, there is a certain character of service (perhaps more difficult to find in some ...) that shines through and makes it easier to do what it seems. impossible, or even downright idiotic, and when asked (those lucky enough to survive) they always reply "I did what anyone else would have done, it's nothing special." The special part is that they usually don't even see how disinterested they are, And that makes the sacrifice even more powerful than those who give everything. Everyone gives something

Some make it seem easy, even giving the maximum sacrifice of their life, mobility, body, parts of the body, psyche ... others make it seem difficult with the amount of complaints from day to day. But everyone in the United States military has volunteered to be there. Each person. Now it may have been your best option, or the only option, to let go of a past and achieve some goals or move on. But most people in the U.S. military (at least those with whom I have had the privilege and honor to serve, and the grace to be able to listen to those who served before me) have an inherent altruism. that I have not found anywhere else en masse. I think it's because we are a totally voluntary force. There may be times when we lose sight of the fact that we volunteered to be there, especially when it comes to half the watch (ah, mids ...) working on 3 cups of coffee that tasted like pure turpentine , trying to stay alert enough in rough seas for that fishing boat that someone forgot to keep the lights on because they are probably doing things they shouldn't, wondering why the hell you agreed to serve in this God-forsaken part of the world ... or you're cleaning the worst gunk you can imagine from places and crevices that cut and dull your fingers. Then you remember, "Oh yeah. I joined to get some skills. I joined to get a paycheck. I joined to get out of the house safely. I joined to see the world. I joined for money for school. I joined out of pride (in myself and country). I joined for my family, so that they can sleep safely and I can intercept anyone, in any country, who intends to harm them and make them pay at THEIR house, not mine. But ultimately

This is the cynical response of the former military employee of the current government ...

I'm not sure if they still exist, but there used to be a ton of billets that contractors could easily make. Specifically, I remember that the Air Force used to have uniformed members who worked in gyms and at the reception of accommodation.

When not deployed, the medic seemed like a good deal as an outsider. Most medical facilities; specialists, doctors, dentists are open from 8 to 4 from Monday to Friday and on Wednesday afternoons free for training. Compared to civilian doctors, they seemed to have fewer patients and less stress, but also a small

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This is the cynical response of the former military employee of the current government ...

I'm not sure if they still exist, but there used to be a ton of billets that contractors could easily make. Specifically, I remember that the Air Force used to have uniformed members who worked in gyms and at the reception of accommodation.

When not deployed, the medic seemed like a good deal as an outsider. Most medical facilities; specialists, doctors, dentists are open from 8 to 4 from Monday to Friday and on Wednesday afternoons free for training. Compared to civilian doctors, they seemed to have fewer patients and less stress, but also a smaller salary. Now that I think about it, the attorneys at the law office had more or less the same job ...

The military also has a lot of jobs that are done to deal with unlikely contingencies. Many WMD response teams were established in the National Guard after 9/11. There are many jobs created to deal with some contingency because a general or a politician thought it was a good idea. It's also an easy way out for contractors to sell expensive equipment to the military that may never work. Lots of planning and training operations for these jobs, too few to get tangible results. Predictable hours and maybe easy money abroad. Not a bad place to be. Very easy...

While not part of the DOD (except in wartime when the navy owns them), the Coast Guard still receives military pay and benefits. Some Coast Guard jobs are quite dangerous; Boat drivers, rescue swimmers, pilots, ext ... Maritime Safety inspectors are also uniformed in the coast guard, that always puzzled me. Since that seemed more like a great job for a civilian from GS ...

The easiest I saw was an E-3 who worked in Morals, Welfare and Recreation (MWR). He was the projectionist at the base theater and screened movies once a night and twice on Saturdays. He also cleaned the theater between and after performances. He calculated that he worked between 20 and 25 hours. one week. No one bothered him or came to supervise him, because he made sure he did his job well.

His supervisor, the MWR NCOIC, left him alone. He had enough staff, so there was no point asking the projectionist to do other work as well. In normal time, he was promoted to E-4 and E-5.

Expect! That was

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The easiest I saw was an E-3 who worked in Morals, Welfare and Recreation (MWR). He was the projectionist at the base theater and screened movies once a night and twice on Saturdays. He also cleaned the theater between and after performances. He calculated that he worked between 20 and 25 hours. one week. No one bothered him or came to supervise him, because he made sure he did his job well.

His supervisor, the MWR NCOIC, left him alone. He had enough staff, so there was no point asking the projectionist to do other work as well. In normal time, he was promoted to E-4 and E-5.

Expect! That wasn't the best part! He lived in the actors' rooms at the back of the stage. The theater was built during WWII and the two small suites were for the use of entertainers during WWII, if necessary. So he had complete privacy on his own bachelor floor. Not living in the barracks bay listening to snoring, arguing, loud radios, smelling others without washing, etc. It is not necessary to store your belongings in a small wall closet.

One problem: her duty and her living arrangements were so fat, so sweet, that she couldn't say goodbye. If it did, a surrogate would discover the arrangement and want to participate in it, or spread the word to others who would share the projectionist duty. I don't know if, or when, he ever said goodbye!

I'd say it's an Aide de Camp. All you have to do is be friendly and put up with a general and be his personal assistant. You will soon be on the fast track to becoming a high ranking officer.

Some would say that each job is difficult and easy depending on who you ask, I disagree. Some jobs are extremely easy to perform and require minimal mental effort and perhaps a few hours of hard manual work every day. Other jobs require you to put in all your effort at all times to be ready.

However, an easy job really depends on where you are more than your occupation. Depends on your

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I'd say it's an Aide de Camp. All you have to do is be friendly and put up with a general and be his personal assistant. You will soon be on the fast track to becoming a high ranking officer.

Some would say that each job is difficult and easy depending on who you ask, I disagree. Some jobs are extremely easy to perform and require minimal mental effort and perhaps a few hours of hard manual work every day. Other jobs require you to put in all your effort at all times to be ready.

However, an easy job really depends on where you are more than your occupation. Depending on your unit, your job can be extremely easy because it is not a very required occupation like in other units. For example, someone who works in a ceremonial unit (funeral services) in a region that does not have many veterans. Or in the event of a fire, someone who performs water purification and is stationed in a non-deployable unit within CONUS (Continental USA). There are also some jobs that do not have daily tasks, but are assigned weekly or monthly tasks; Depending on the cunning of the supervisor or NCO, they can get on with their task fairly quickly and skate (military jargon for loafing) the rest of the week.

Let me start by jokingly answering: if they're not in the Marine Corps, it's the easiest job. If it is not 03 Infantry, it is the easiest.

I was originally in the infantry as a heavy machine gun (MOS 0331). I got bored of the herd mentality and took up a new hobby as a Scout / Sniper (MOS 8541).

From the perspective of a former Marine, and considering the number of jobs available in the Corps, I would say that Musician (MOS 5526) is the easiest job in the Marine Corps.
The Air Force has two band positions. Regional Band (AFSC 3N131) and Premier Band (AFSC 3N231).
The army, santa m # * t the

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Let me start by jokingly answering: if they're not in the Marine Corps, it's the easiest job. If it is not 03 Infantry, it is the easiest.

I was originally in the infantry as a heavy machine gun (MOS 0331). I got bored of the herd mentality and took up a new hobby as a Scout / Sniper (MOS 8541).

From the perspective of a former Marine, and considering the number of jobs available in the Corps, I would say that Musician (MOS 5526) is the easiest job in the Marine Corps.
The Air Force has two band positions. Regional Band (AFSC 3N131) and Premier Band (AFSC 3N231).
The Army, holy s # * t the first sixteen MOS are band members:
02B Cornet or Trumpeter
02C Baritone or
Euphonium 02D Horn 02E
Trombone
02F Tuba
02G Flute or
Flutist 02H Oboe
02J Clarinet
02K Bassoon
02L Saxophonist
02M Percussion
02N Keyboard 02S
Member Special band
02T Guitarist
02U Electric bassist
02Z Sergeant Major Bands
The Navy also has one. MU rated, Musician

Personally, being a musician would be difficult because I cannot play an instrument to save my life.
Also for the consideration of the US Postal Secretary of the Navy, Air Force Pest Management.

The easiest job in the military is the same as the easiest job anywhere else - it's the one you're passionate about. There is nothing worse than getting a job you hate. In my 22 years of service, I have served in various roles. I was an advanced paratrooper observer, a fire team leader, a motar man, then I became a helicopter mechanic, aircraft technical inspector, reengagement noncommissioned officer, flight line supervisor, aviation production control noncommissioned officer, Platoon Sergeant and for a time a 1st Sergeant in charge of more than 200 personnel. They were all easy for me once I got it. The best that I can't

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The easiest job in the military is the same as the easiest job anywhere else - it's the one you're passionate about. There is nothing worse than getting a job you hate. In my 22 years of service, I have served in various roles. I was an advanced paratrooper observer, a fire team leader, a motar man, later I became a helicopter mechanic, aircraft technical inspector, reengagement noncommissioned officer, flight line supervisor, aviation production control noncommissioned officer , Platoon Sergeant and for a time a 1st Sergeant in charge of more than 200 personnel. They were all easy for me once I got it. The best thing I can tell you about my service is that I learned a lot. But of course that's me.

Any CW-5 job. It takes a lot to get there, but once you do, you're a top dog who can do whatever you want. I met 2 CW-5s, it was like meeting Don Corleone. They walk on grass CSM, 2 star generals call them by their first name and vice versa. They do PT entirely on their own, make whatever adjustments they want. They have music on their Humvee. No one questions CW-4/5. NCOs love them and Jr. officers are afraid of them. They show up coffee in hand, emphasizing nothing, just wearing the correct uniform, but even if they skip the LBV / LCE no one is going to tell them anything anyway.

P

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Any CW-5 job. It takes a lot to get there, but once you do, you're a top dog who can do whatever you want. I met 2 CW-5s, it was like meeting Don Corleone. They walk on grass CSM, 2 star generals call them by their first name and vice versa. They do PT entirely on their own, make whatever adjustments they want. They have music on their Humvee. No one questions CW-4/5. NCOs love them and Jr. officers are afraid of them. They show up coffee in hand, emphasizing nothing, just wearing the correct uniform, but even if they skip the LBV / LCE no one is going to tell them anything anyway.

Post script. Thanks for all the love. I seek all the votes in favor of the military members of the past and present.

As already mentioned, it all depends on you! However, in my experience the easiest job in AF was OC, Operation and Compliance.

You print out a list of questions and you go to a particular department, like a hospital, and you ask them all these questions. You report directly to the commander, so if you want to be a jerk to someone you don't like, and he or she ranks higher than you, ask him some tough questions and he'll most likely fail (there are a lot of specifics). The best part is that YOU schedule the inspections, you don't have to do it every day ... So 80% of the time you exercise, do it yourself.

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As already mentioned, it all depends on you! However, in my experience the easiest job in AF was OC, Operation and Compliance.

You print out a list of questions and you go to a particular department, like a hospital, and you ask them all these questions. You report directly to the commander, so if you want to be a jerk to someone you don't like, and he or she ranks higher than you, ask him some tough questions and he'll most likely fail (there are a lot of specifics). The best part is that YOU schedule the inspections, you don't have to do it every day ... So 80% of the time you exercise, you do your thing and everyone thinks you're doing something important ...

An easy job is not easy in itself. Often times, easy jobs also meant that some people volunteered for other tasks, such as base beautification or honor guarding. So while the job description may seem like a cake walk, the sheer boredom and added chores will make up for it.

On a side note, I learned this firsthand as I was not the poster aviator and I was volunteered for honor guard duty because I never shined my boots or ironed my uniform. I was the maintenance of the KC-10 and our uniforms were always shredded and the steel tips were never polished well. That's why I volunteered hahaha for my excuses.

Easy can be defined from infinite points of view. If you are a PT Stud, being a Ranger or Combat Diver can be a piece of cake for you. Or if you're a math and science genius, working at nuclear power plants in the Navy may be easy for you.

The other complicating factor in the military is its chain of command. Technically, you might have the quietest and easiest MOS ever, but the NCOs and officers who oversee you could easily make your life hell.

What are your personal strengths? Choosing a MOS that suits those strengths would be my advice.

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