What is the dream job for a chemical engineering graduate?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Cash Compton



What is the dream job for a chemical engineering graduate?

I think that for the vast majority of specialties, the answer is something very long, like "There is no dream job, just find what you like to do."

But in the case of chemical engineers, I think the answer is probably brewing.

It is something that all chemical engineers who consume alcohol discuss. I think even chemical engineers who don't drink alcohol want to get in on the action. But most chemical engineers talk about making a bank by working for some oil or biopharmaceutical company and then living life using our chemical engineering talents brewing beer for the rest of their lives and making the world a better place.

It's kind of a definitive chemical engineering process. It contains mass transfer, transport phenomena, reactor design and expansion, process control and thermodynamics, and each batch released results in a giant party.

Also, the money is not too bad.

I am a chemical engineer (process design engineer to be very specific).

Let's take a look at the activities I do at my workplace one by one.

Activity No. 1: Mailbox

Check mailbox for manager's instructions, check emails from other engineering departments, customer email, and supplier email.

Activity No. 2: Solve queries from other engineering departments

As a process engineer, I have to coordinate closely with other engineering departments (specifically Instrumentation, Piping, and Mechanics). They always have to change one thing or another in P&ID; and to do so, they always have to take one

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I am a chemical engineer (process design engineer to be very specific).

Let's take a look at the activities I do at my workplace one by one.

Activity No. 1: Mailbox

Check mailbox for manager's instructions, check emails from other engineering departments, customer email, and supplier email.

Activity No. 2: Solve queries from other engineering departments

As a process engineer, I have to coordinate closely with other engineering departments (specifically Instrumentation, Piping, and Mechanics). They always have to change one thing or another in P&ID; and for this, they should always follow the advice of process engineers.

Activity n. # 3: attend vendor meeting (usually through Lync)

Usually other engineering departments deal directly with suppliers, but they always require the support of the process engineer during meetings, because the process engineer is at the pinnacle of engineering and drives the design process.

Activity n. # 4: prepare documents, drawings (P&ID), run simulations and perform calculations

There is a project, there is a client and there is a project schedule, so in summary there are things to do. For example, I work on a sulfur recovery unit project for Saudi Aramco.

Activity n. # 5: review vendor documents

Other engineering disciplines obtain all technical documents from suppliers and pass them on to us for review and comment. This keeps me busy almost every day.

Activity No. 6: Attend 3D model reviews, design review and HAZOP session for the project.

These are very critical stages in project design. These reviews involve the customer, the supplier, and all engineering disciplines (HAZOP will also have a chairman to drive the HAZOP).

A process engineer is expected to answer all kinds of queries that arise in these sessions and advocate for the company's design (trust me, this is not so easy).

Activity n. 7: Attend or give internal training

The technical training programs are carried out in the company to enhance the skill and knowledge of the process engineers, we have to attend these programs and sometimes we also have to give technical training to juniors.

I've mentioned just a few key activities that I do as a process design engineer.

Also, whatever happens, I always find some time to have a cup of hot tea with my colleagues, it helps to cool me down.

Greetings,

Manoj Dube

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