What is the cheapest food in Canada?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Imogen Wilkinson



What is the cheapest food in Canada?

Here are 7 of the cheapest foods in Canada. (prices are approximate, before taxes)

  1. Anything from Timmy's (chicken sandwich for under $ 3 at Tim Hortons!)
  2. Hotdog and a pop from Costco: $ 2
  3. Costco Large Fries: $ 2.50
  4. Stone Baked Pepperoni XL Metro Pizza Wednesday nights: $ 9

5. A whole box of chicken tenders from the hot food clearance section at Wal-Mart after 7 pm any night math $ / math 3.50

6. A whole Portuguese chicken from Farrol Churresqueira on Cawthra Road, Mississauga for $ 14 (4 feeds)

7. An A&W Friends Burger (under $ 3)

These are some of my junk food items that taste amazing and

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Here are 7 of the cheapest foods in Canada. (prices are approximate, before taxes)

  1. Anything from Timmy's (chicken sandwich for under $ 3 at Tim Hortons!)
  2. Hotdog and a pop from Costco: $ 2
  3. Costco Large Fries: $ 2.50
  4. Stone Baked Pepperoni XL Metro Pizza Wednesday nights: $ 9

5. A whole box of chicken tenders from the hot food clearance section at Wal-Mart after 7 pm any night math $ / math 3.50

6. A whole Portuguese chicken from Farrol Churresqueira on Cawthra Road, Mississauga for $ 14 (4 feeds)

7. An A&W Friends Burger (under $ 3)

These are some of my junk food items that taste amazing and don't pinch your pocket. Add your contributions in the comments below.

Thanks for reading, sharing and commenting, Ron.

Here are some other relevant answers:

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Cheapest Food in Canada? For protein, I can suggest that eggs are the cheapest food. Eggs can be purchased in Canada for as little as 25 cents each in Canadian currency. I regularly enjoy hard-boiled eggs for breakfast, along with a cucumber or tomato.

I also like them with avocado. Although avocados are expensive here, normally around C $ 8.00 for a bag of 6.

Thanks for the question

R. Ridgway

Lion teeth,

available for free, wherever dandelions grow,

more so now that herbicides have been banned ...

my Greek mother, survivor of Nazi occupation / famine,

joyfully discovering its abundance in our New World home,

pick them up, boil them, add lemon / olive oil to your favorite salad,

a stupidly mortifying embarrassment and an unfortunate reflux trigger

of a child who has never known the true meaning of hunger ...

All store-bought food in Canada is cheap. Rice is the cheapest, probably because it comes from Pakistan.

I have lived in Melbourne, Australia for 4 months and more than 3 years in Toronto, Canada.

I am working as a Java developer (software industry), so I can give my input from that perspective.

-The daily routine of going to work

Toronto is vast, jobs are scattered around Toronto and close to cities. I have seen people who travel between 60 and 80 kilometers one way to the office. Sometimes it is very difficult. My wife travels 55km one way, cannot drive and has to rely on Carpool (if available) it still takes her 1.5 hours even after having world class roads (due to traffic jams).

Edit: - I'm taking public transportation to work every day, what it costs

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I have lived in Melbourne, Australia for 4 months and more than 3 years in Toronto, Canada.

I am working as a Java developer (software industry), so I can give my input from that perspective.

-The daily routine of going to work

Toronto is vast, jobs are scattered around Toronto and close to cities. I have seen people who travel between 60 and 80 kilometers one way to the office. Sometimes it is very difficult. My wife travels 55km one way, cannot drive and has to rely on Carpool (if available) it still takes her 1.5 hours even after having world class roads (due to traffic jams).

Edit: - I am taking public transport to work every day, which costs me around CAD400 / month and 3 hours of commute on the so-called Go train, which is still running on diesel after many decades of operation and still being very slow. I live in Brampton about 50km from Toronto and it takes 55 minutes from MountPleasant, Brampton to Union Station and then 20 minutes walk to my office. So a total of 1.5 hours of commute each day.

I know that in Melbourne public transport travel is cheaper around 150AUD / month, no matter what type of transport you are taking, but the GO train has a different fare structure. All regions around Toronto have different transportation and different fare structures. Go Train connects different cities spread across Toronto.

In Melbourne: If I am traveling from Werribee to SouthernCross or narre warren to SoutherCross, the fare will be the same; If you use a monthly pass, you can use the same pass. This is not the case with GTA. Crossing cities will continue to add to your rate.

-differences / attitudes in the workplace

I have worked with only 2 employers in both places, so my experience is good for both. Canada is more acceptable to immigrants. No one in the world can feel out of place anytime, anywhere. Canadians are relaxed too. It depends on the employer you work for.

Edit: - The job market is good, but recruiters and companies are more professional to deal with in Australia. Recruiters here will blindly submit your profiles, while in Australia they select you properly first and all subsequent steps are more streamlined as well.

Java GTA Senior Developer Salaries: - 90,000 - 120,000 full time, 65–85 / hr under contract.

Java Melbourne Senior Developer Salaries: - 110,000 - 140,000 full time, 700–850 / day under contract.

My friend, who has a house in Melbourne, lives 20-40 minutes by train from the CBD, a nice 4 bedroom house costs around 600,000 in the western suburbs, a similar house in GTA away from downtown Toronto at less 50 kilometers and 1.5 hours by train will cost you 1.1 million.

The housing tax per year in the GTA area can range from 5000K to 8500K per year. It depends on its value and area.

Now do the math and calculate the savings against wages.

-differences in English dialect

Canadians have an easy to understand dialect compared to Australians.

-Grocery shopping

A little expensive in Australia, but you can say that it is comparable to Canada. In Canada there are more stores to compare prices, so it doesn't matter where you stay. I would definitely travel less to do the shopping.

-difference in seasonal activities

I think Canadians have a good number of activities.

-sense of opportunity?

more opportunities in Canada in all fields. As it is part of North America and most of the world it is driven from this part of the world. More jobs / opportunities, also more immigrants and newcomers and therefore less wages.

Edit: - Salaries are not comparable to Australia. Also, salaries are not actually comparable to the cost of living in Canada, the houses / rents are much higher than in Australia. I now own a home in Canada and I know how expensive it is to own a home in Canada.

-sports culture

More sports in Canada than in Australia

Edit: - I may be wrong

-climate

It's very cold in Canada.

-any other memorable difference

Lower wages in Canada compared to Australia. Although Australia is expensive, Canada is not cheap either. Many places to go and see many scenic views in Canada. In the end, I think I would save more in Australia. In addition, traveling to nearby countries is not cheap as others would perceive. Even the flights between Toronto-Quebec / NewYork or any other nearby place are not less than 300CAD (minimum). Where to fly from Australia to Asia or within Australia is very cheap. Tickets from Delhi to Melbourne now cost between 500 and 1000 AUD compared to 1400-1600 CAD for Toronto.

- Accommodation

Edit:-

As of today (May 2020) I have not seen any NEW homes (townhouse or townhouse) below 750K (probably 850K to be new) or close to it in GTA (Scarborough, Toronto, North York, Markham, Brampton, Mississauga - All this covers about 40–50 km of travel from the center). But in Australia (Melbourne), you can get a new (detached) house in less than 600K (traveling 30-40km from the CBD).

Higher home loan rates in Australia (2% in Canada, 3% in Australia), but Canada also has a high property tax (a whopping 5000 CAD compared to 1000-1500 AUD).

Travel / Transportation

GTA in Canada is very well connected, but it is not cheap either and I would say more expensive than Melbourne. To travel 30 to 40 km, you would pay more in Toronto than in Melbourne. Even driving a car would be expensive because of the insurance. In my first year as a car owner, I am paying CAD400 / month. In GTA- during the first year it will be 350 to 400 CAD for sure.

Edition after 4 years in Canada

I guess it really depends where you come from.

  1. Cold. Our winters are cold. I know many people from other countries who have moved to Canada and it is the number one complaint. They never expect winters to be this cold.
  2. Culture. I guess this is the same for any country, expect a culture shock. Canadians tend to be more socially educated based on your point of view. Opening doors for other people, allowing cars to merge, queuing for services / shopping instead of interrupting. Friendly conversations with strangers, etc.
  3. The size. Canada is really, really, really, really real
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I guess it really depends where you come from.

  1. Cold. Our winters are cold. I know many people from other countries who have moved to Canada and it is the number one complaint. They never expect winters to be this cold.
  2. Culture. I guess this is the same for any country, expect a culture shock. Canadians tend to be more socially educated based on your point of view. Opening doors for other people, allowing cars to merge, queuing for services / shopping instead of interrupting. Friendly conversations with strangers, etc.
  3. The size. Canada is really really really really really really ... great. Unless you live in a big city like Toronto or Vancouver, it can feel empty. Great distances between places. It is just a big country, not many people, just a huge country.
  4. Public transport. Taking the city buses is not reliable, they never arrive on time with any schedule. Always plan ahead and allow some leeway. Especially when it snows. Buses can get stuck.
  5. Health care. Hurry to get permanent residency status and apply for your SIN (social security number) and medical care (if you're in Ontario) right away. Almost all health care is free in Canada (paid for with taxes).
  6. Works. General jobs are generally easy to come by, if you are willing to work for any fast food store or shopping mall you can be hired easily. Don't be picky and you'll be good to go. It is also easier to start your own business if you are originally from outside of Canada than if you were born in Canada (government grant privileges). Don't expect to get any kind of office, management, or corporate type job right away.
  7. Cable. TV / Cable is expensive. I did not buy it. Do what more and more Canadians are doing / converting. Just go online and stream TV for free (still legal in Canada).
  8. Diversity. Canada is a very diverse and multicultural country. Tons of religions, tons of languages. Regardless of where it comes from, it's easy to fit in.
  9. Advice. In Canada, it is a courtesy to tip an additional 10-15% for various services, such as dining at a good restaurant (if the service was excellent). Many other countries do not have this. If you are not sure, ask when you will be there.
  10. Cold. This deserves two places. It's so cold in winter that this deserves two spots. Bring a heavy heavy winter coat.

Let me give you a list of things to bring: by the way… we buy medications for 5 to 6 months, but we throw away most of it after a year. We are still using 6 amrutanjan purchased in 2009😎 All of our baby oil, etc. it was thrown in the trash. Put everything in the well packed luggage. Do not carry anything in your hand luggage. There is no liquid in hand luggage.

  1. Bring formal clothing such as a suit, shirt, interview tie, jeans and pants, T-shirts, sweatpants, and jackets. Bring $ 2000 in cash to buy a winter coat, shoes, thermal clothing, etc. for -40 degrees. There will be other expenses such as taxi fare from the airport to the accommodation, winter shoes, hat, ra
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Let me give you a list of things to bring: by the way… we buy medications for 5 to 6 months, but we throw away most of it after a year. We are still using 6 amrutanjan purchased in 2009😎 All of our baby oil, etc. it was thrown in the trash. Put everything in the well packed luggage. Do not carry anything in your hand luggage. There is no liquid in hand luggage.

  1. Bring formal clothing such as a suit, shirt, interview tie, jeans and pants, T-shirts, sweatpants, and jackets. Bring $ 2000 in cash to buy a winter coat, shoes, thermal clothing, etc. for -40 degrees. There will be other expenses such as taxi fare from the airport to the accommodation, winter shoes, hat, raincoat, starter meals, etc. It takes 20 days for the bank to clear international money orders, so we have $ 10,000 in cash. We bought the Canada Goose coat for $ 1000 each.
  2. Bring medicines like brufen, crocin, cough drops, amrutanjan, Vicks, etc. Basic medicine for 1 to 2 years. Over-the-counter drugs are very expensive here. Don't forget to take a 3-month health insurance until you get the health card. Solar life insurance is good.
  3. Bring little heat and eat prepared food, biryani, Chole, Rajma pack.
  4. Make sure you have a data plan, wifi and get used to google, ttc bus and metro.
  5. Get used to Uber and lyft in case you get lost because here you have to get off and go north, south, east, west. The buses do not take you to your destination. You have to take routes, change from 3 to 4 buses to get to the destination.
  6. Read all you can about Canada on Quora, the web portal for Canadian immigration, settlements and lifestyle, articles and charcha from Canadian Desi.
  7. Accommodation is difficult, so book early through kijiji, canadiandesi .com, view.ca, Craigslist, or airbnb, etc. Reserve an initially furnished room or apartment.
  8. If you have driving experience, get a letter of recommendation from the traffic officer or whatever.
  9. Scream if you need help. I'm used to picking up a damsel in distress.
  10. Last but not least, remember that you are coming to Canada in search of a better life and not to get rich. The countries of the United Arab Emirates and the Middle East make you rich because there is no income tax. Western countries don't make you rich, but they collect our taxes and feed the poor by giving them social welfare.
  11. Do not convert currency to your local currency. For example: CAD is INR 52. If you convert, you won't be happy. Nothing here is less than $ 1.25 plus 13% tax, so if you convert nothing is below INR 75–80. A coffee or tea costs $ 1.89 plus tax (small cup) at Tim's, which is the cheapest coffee shop. So if you are earning 50kpm in India, you will never get 50k CAD salary in Canada. Feel lucky if your salary is $ 5,000. Typically $ 2,000–3500 pm for 75–80% of the population.

Having lived in the US for over 15 years before moving to Canada, I don't think this is necessarily true.

Okay, I live in the GTA where food prices can be cheaper than, say, remote areas of Canada like the Yukon, but when comparing food prices in Toronto to densely populated areas in the US, I don't think there is a big difference.

The first mistake people make is comparing Canadian and US prices on par; This is not the case as the loonie is weaker so it is not an apples to apples comparison.

So if something costs $ 5 in the US, it is comparable to $ 7 in Canadian dollars.

With that said, here's a

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Having lived in the US for over 15 years before moving to Canada, I don't think this is necessarily true.

Okay, I live in the GTA where food prices can be cheaper than, say, remote areas of Canada like the Yukon, but when comparing food prices in Toronto to densely populated areas in the US, I don't think there is a big difference.

The first mistake people make is comparing Canadian and US prices on par; This is not the case as the loonie is weaker so it is not an apples to apples comparison.

So if something costs $ 5 in the US, it is comparable to $ 7 in Canadian dollars.

With that said, here are a few things I've noticed in food prices:

Dairy products and eggs are expensive in Canada as none of this is imported from the US to "protect Canadian dairy farmers" but I have to say the quality is better.

Pork is generally cheaper here than prices in US grocery stores.

Fast food is more expensive in Canada, but in reality any developed nation would have a hard time beating the United States in this regard.

Some fast food places here are a big scam, especially the ones posing as healthy alternatives like Mr Greek.

Eating out largely depends on the type of restaurant you go to.

Neighborhood diners and international restaurants i.e. Chinese, Indian, are usually very cheap compared to similar places I've found in Chicago.

Junk food and fried food are rare in Canada; go to most gas stations in the US and you will find a plethora of low-quality fried, breaded, carb-loaded, and fatty foods at very inexpensive prices. For U $ 10 you will be ready for the day.

However, in general, some things are more expensive and others not so much. I feel like the overall quality of the meat and dairy is better here, not as a load of hormones or antibiotics.

Budget wise, a week of groceries cost me a little less than what I used to spend in Chicago, but I pay more if I want to enjoy junk food here and by all accounts that's a good thing.

I agree with Scott, do not try to work on a visitor visa. Many real good answers can be found here.

For the record (and I didn't see this being addressed), there are two types of meat markets: one where you can buy beef, poultry, pork, etc., and another where you look for a temp company with someone of your choice. The ones that offer beef, poultry, pork, etc., are very, very safe (with very strict rules), and you will almost certainly find what you came for; with the other there is no guarantee and few rules. … Finding what you came looking for is a matter of luck. (If you are really good what

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I agree with Scott, do not try to work on a visitor visa. Many real good answers can be found here.

For the record (and I didn't see this being addressed), there are two types of meat markets: one where you can buy beef, poultry, pork, etc., and another where you look for a temp company with someone of your choice. The ones that offer beef, poultry, pork, etc., are very, very safe (with very strict rules), and you will almost certainly find what you came for; with the other there is no guarantee and few rules. … Finding what you came looking for is a matter of luck. (If you are very handsome, not so much, for me, it's just luck)

At the same time, a lot depends on your vision of "security." As with almost every other subject, I have a rather unusual point of view. As is also my usual practice, since Canada is a large place, giving answers can be lengthy. I will try to do an intermission.

I always gain weight when I go to Canada (that's not safe). I think I'm addicted to sauce at Swiss Chalet and because of Timmy's I probably drink too much coffee. (and all cheddar bagels)

The poutine can't be good for my arteries and the meat is so fantastic I think it's probably okay to eat a whole steer. (It is, isn't it?)

There was a restaurant in Toronto that had snails so good as an appetizer I was almost crazy about the garlic. We were drinking good Niagara wine, so I lost count of how many dishes we made pigs with. Does anyone have the slightest idea how dangerously embarrassing it is to order their sixth plate of snails, with their sixth related garlic bread? Well, imagining that, I could say (if I remember) that we didn't necessarily stop there.

Once again, a restaurant in Quebec City had such exquisite canard a l'orange that we felt compelled to order a second. What kind of thing is that to do with visitors? The waiter shot us a nasty look. What kind of declasted pork asks for a second course? That's not fair.

People are also very dangerous (they wear that well known Canadian camouflage to be courteous and helpful). I once suggested we have an after-dinner port (innocent enough), the waitress asked if we didn't want some Stilton with it. I fell in love, I must confess this with total honesty and respect to the reader. Hook, line and lead.

Here's the science behind the catch: Port, being volatile, is dried in Canadian artificial heating (at least in my experience), so it needs a refill. So the Port: Stilton relationship is ruined, so naturally you need more Stilton. Ipso facto. (sadly, ad infinitum)

Be careful, this can happen with cheddar cheese too - I've had this problem more than once on first class Via Rail service between Montreal and Toronto. It is a very unsafe place. Speaking of danger, I think I was almost taken advantage of once by a nice lady sitting next to me on the train, but that may have been a hallucination caused by the harbor.

Canadians fool you into the concept that it is a beautiful and safe country, and then they use the secret food weapon. The food, in most of Canada, is of excellent quality and very affordable. There is a clear and present danger of eating too much. (damn Canucks, huh?)

A couple of weeks ago, during a visit, I went to see a duck farmer outside of Toronto. A big mistake. (What was I thinking?)

They sold whole ducks for $ 15 Canadian, that's disgusting. How many roast ducks should a person safely eat? I flew home and my doctor noticed that my blood pressure was slightly higher. (not too high for the interested reader to rest)

He asked me what I had been doing differently, so I said "eating duck on the grill." He asked "skin and everything". Duhhh. (Why the hell would you roast a duck (or two) (or three) in the first place?) (A little hoi sin sauce for the skin, a pretty Niagara rose ...)

—- Entrance, have a beer, go out for a dart and maybe call on the phone to order a pizza -

I once made the terrible mistake of moving to Montreal, where I instantly loved the city and the food (the people are great too). I came relatively thin and I didn't go that far.

In the maritime provinces, you can overeat lobster and not damage your treasure. You can do the same at Lake Simcoe on a perch. Do you have any idea how much a hanger costs in Paris? In Canada, you can easily fry a bunch to feast on with a bunch of friends. That is deadly. I was surprised that in Europe they sell perch for one. The perch, I think they are a fish in training, and they do not respect that they prepare them in quantities of less than half a dozen in size, however, my experience does not extend to ichthyology.

Dangerous place, Canada.

Canada has an established religion, it's called the National Hockey League. The sacraments are celebrated mainly with beer. If you are in one of the holy places, the royal arena, you may be limited to just beer and maybe hot dogs. The last time I was at the Air Canada Center it was almost legendary pissed off.

In satellite worship centers, known as "sports bars," you must combine beer with nachos, pizza, hamburgers, or a combination thereof. Orthodoxy also allows you to conduct your own worship services at home with your friends, but these sacramental foods and beer are always included. I have heard unconfirmed reports that pizza is not delivered above the Arctic Circle; maybe someone will comment.

Canadian cheddar is a minefield; some can navigate it, I can't. I have to think, "oh, some medium cheddar cheese, which goes well for an omelet with my peameal bacon for breakfast." Then, nail the block of cheddar cheese you bought for breakfast with wine (or shred it on your nachos) the night before and go through a plain omelette.

Then there is that annoying feeling of goodness that Canada seems to want to spread all over. So feel free to indulge in the great food, knowing that it won't harm anything but your waistline, heart, and cardiovascular system. Plus, you can walk around and know that the statistical odds of being a victim of crime are pretty much in your favor. Then you stop by a place that sells shawarma (for example) and the whole process starts all over again.

So the only problem you'll have with Canadian food is that pesky Canadian goodness and abundance. It's a trap, be very careful

Before you go: The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) is a very, very serious entity; you can meet them when you arrive; check with your local Canadian embassy, ​​consulate or high commission before bringing food (for example) to Canada. Never, never lie to CBSA ...

… Otherwise, your stay could be interrupted even before it begins. They are one of the many levels of protection that Canadians enjoy.

I will try this ...

I definitely have some genuine Canadian maple syrup, it's expensive to buy, but I would take some home with me. I always have to have a good size bottle at home. I use it not only in pancakes and French toast, but sometimes I have it over cereal, on top of a hot toasted bagel that I have dressed in natural peanut butter and organic banana, sometimes in my coffee as well when I want. especially satisfying and relaxing and I often use it as a sweetener when I'm cooking / baking. Basically I like to use it as often as I can because I enjoy it immensely and if you get the

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I will try this ...

I definitely have some genuine Canadian maple syrup, it's expensive to buy, but I would take some home with me. I always have to have a good size bottle at home. I use it not only in pancakes and French toast, but sometimes I have it over cereal, on top of a hot toasted bagel that I have dressed in natural peanut butter and organic banana, sometimes in my coffee as well when I want. especially satisfying and relaxing and I often use it as a sweetener when I'm cooking / baking. Basically, I like to use it as often as I can because I enjoy it immensely and if you get the organic kind, it also has nutritional benefits. :)

Butter tarts, nanaimo (sp?) Bars, and beaver tails ... all the Canadian sweets that are popular. You should be able to find at least the first two in various places that sell candy.

If you get the chance, try a maple candy made in the snow. It is not very easy to come by, but if you visit a sugar bush in winter, you can buy many different maple treats ... candies, teas, syrup, caramel, etc. and sometimes they can make maple candy in the snow for the public.

TIM HORTONS. Sorry but if you are visiting Canada this is NON NEGOTIABLE ... You MUST visit a Tim Hortons and enjoy hot coffee and a sweet of your choice ... It is such an iconic coffee shop here in Canada that they sell something like that like 80% of all coffee bought outside the home. Nobody competes with them, they are a place that many Canadians visit DAILY and have done so for years. I know it is my favorite place and I know it is the same for many Canadians.

(My last journey);)

Poutine ... again, a popular Canadian dish ... worth trying at least once while you're here. Smoke's Poutinerie has featured many variations, but probably the best place in the world to eat it is in Quebec, especially since it's the Quebec cheese curd that makes it the best I hear.

Poutinerie de Smoke - Menu

Tourtiere (a type of meatloaf) is a French-Canadian Christmas tradition that you might want to try if you visit Quebec. I was lucky to have a French Canadian friend growing up and would receive one as a Christmas present.

If you go to Maritimes, be sure to try the seafood, also if you go to the coast of BC

Wherever you go, if you enjoy a drink, try Crown Royal Canadian whiskey. They also make a "maple finish" variety that is especially nice to bake and cook at this time of year or to add to eggnog. It has been named the world whiskey of the year! Crown Royal's 'masterpiece' whiskey runs out in 8 minutes

If you are coming to the Niagara Wine Country, try our world famous Icewine.

If you go to Montreal, try their famous smoked meat sandwiches and I suggest you go to an outdoor cafe if you come in spring or summer to Quebec City and enjoy a delicious croissant with your morning coffee.

Actually, if you come to Quebec City, you will find some fantastic food, especially the breads and cakes ...

I could add more later when they come to mind, that's what comes to mind right now. I hope you enjoy your visit to Canada! :)

Thanks for the A2A.

My experiences are limited to one region of Canada (which charges $ 6.55 for 4 liters of milk) and my own infrequent purchasing practices. I live in the country and I try not to go to the city more than twice a month, so as not to take advantage of all the sales.

Once upon a time, eggs, chicken, and fish were the most affordable meat / protein products in Canada. If I had to guess, hot dogs are still the cheapest, but I rarely eat them and all high-quality meat hot dogs are expensive compared to the days before. Eggs at $ 3.50 a dozen are probably the protein source with the highest cost effect.

These days,

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Thanks for the A2A.

My experiences are limited to one region of Canada (which charges $ 6.55 for 4 liters of milk) and my own infrequent purchasing practices. I live in the country and I try not to go to the city more than twice a month, so as not to take advantage of all the sales.

Once upon a time, eggs, chicken, and fish were the most affordable meat / protein products in Canada. If I had to guess, hot dogs are still the cheapest, but I rarely eat them and all high-quality meat hot dogs are expensive compared to the days before. Eggs at $ 3.50 a dozen are probably the protein source with the highest cost effect.

These days, I find that frozen turkey offers great value for the dollar. Although you can extend the burger by mixing breadcrumbs into patties, meatballs, and meatloafs, I think the lean or medium burger is often no less expensive than frozen turkey.

I've learned that if I'm paying attention, I generally spend around $ 2 per serving for red meat and chicken and $ 1.50 per turkey (I always make turkey soup).

Two things I have noticed, for packaged meat, the package size has been reduced to reduce the price increase per package (for example, bacon was sold in 500g packages; now it is sold in 375g packages, for the same price (sneaky companies)) and I have learned that often the brands of the retail supermarket chains often taste as good or better than the national brands at significantly lower prices. I found where I live to whom I can extend my grocery budget the most (house brand pasta, bread, canned cgi tables, and fruits).

Thank you

Disclaimer: In this article / answer there is no "get rich effortless or get rich quick and no snake oil selling", it is some work / some devotion / some team work. And above all some passion. The only difference between reality and imagination is "Karma". Some people imagine results and others go, do, and get the results.

It is not an instant formula:

In case anyone is looking for an instant recipe for this question, I'm sorry it's not an instant formula in that case (don't waste time on this article).

Time is money: (When my wife and I came to this country, we had no money, but you

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Disclaimer: In this article / answer there is no "get rich effortless or get rich quick and no snake oil selling", it is some work / some devotion / some team work. And above all some passion. The only difference between reality and imagination is "Karma". Some people imagine results and others go, do, and get the results.

It is not an instant formula:

In case anyone is looking for an instant recipe for this question, I'm sorry it's not an instant formula in that case (don't waste time on this article).

El tiempo es dinero: (Cuando mi esposa y yo llegamos a este país, no teníamos dinero, sino tiempo, por lo tanto, cambiamos ese cheque). No importa procesar nuestra comida, cosíamos nuestra propia ropa y la de los niños en los primeros años.

  • In Canada and the USA, time is money, more you save time the more you become rich, and in the beginning years, it looks nothing. But as time goes by, penny accumulates to make dollars, and in the end, you are reasonably a rich person as compared to the family who spent times in other activities.

How do you become financially independent and healthy at the same time?

First, save time, we a family of four did, and invested in food processing, looking for fresh, reasonably priced, food and lived happily ever after.

How do you save time? ( This is what we are and this what we did)

In our family of two adults and two kids, that is how we did it. Now our kids are grown up and carry on with their own lives.

T.V. :

  • No one watched T.V. in our family; we as a family always found ways to cut costs in everything we did for survival.

One kid scanned all the flyers, and the other kept an eye on the coupons. Both learned the art of saving money and eating nutritious foods.

Phone:

  • No one talked unnecessarily long conversation on the phone, invested that time in find ways to continue improving our lives, through finding reasonably priced nonperishable items on sale to stock it up.

Internet:

  • No one sits on the computers playing games and browse anything which did not contribute to our lives with positive values.

Parties:

  • Wise and proper use of time in partying and socializing.

Wasting time in other nonproductive activities:

  • Do your soul search and do your controls.

( The only people became rich/affluent/high achievers who cared for the most expensive commodity: Time), This is based on my observations especially on people from my birth country India, fellows who came to Canada at the same time as I did.

Some came as BUMS, and they are now super BUMS, and some came as stars and they are now megastars. The difference was time management and the right company of friends.

Right investments on money saving food processing machines, appliances, and devotion to the welfare of the family:

  • Invest in a good size freezer, food processing equipment( home machines to help, cut/chop/blend/cook/fry/BBQ/ there is no end for small home level processing machines. Learn essential food preservation, packing, and storing and do it.
  • Invest your time in visiting farms and buy fresh vegetables/fruit/eggs and when in vegetables and fruits are in season, process it and store it for year around at pennies on dollars costs.
  • Invest in learning how not to let the food spoil, never waste even one gram of food.
  • Invest time in looking for super deals and plan your weekend so that you could store and process the food properly.

All these things brought our family together, and we all were winners.

There is no end to your imaginations, good buying and eating year around.

I hope it helps,

A sample of big money saving in making things at home.

We made white plain yogurt at home and then further processed by making strained yogurt, and it is exact so-called Greek yogurt at home.

And this white yogurt is the healthiest, extremely cost-effective. This yogurt has very active healthy bacteria, no sugar, and the cost is just milk. FYI, one-liter milk yields one Kg of white yogurt.
Ask any food/dairy scientist, no market yogurt can match this yogurt and it is incredibly healthy. It is highly possible by the store-bought yogurt has almost all dead bacterial in it because it used to take five weeks after making until the consumer gets it. Thanks to modern, distribution systems.

Sam Arora, M.Sc. Dairy Science, U of Punjab, India, M.Sc. Food Science, U of Guelph, Canada, Thirty years of Canadian dairy/food/flavor industry experience.

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Our son at his wedding, my wife and I believe it is all due to healthy/right/proper portions and well-balanced foods/dairy. As you can see, the rest of the crowd is all smaller than him.

Now the third generation of our two grandsons:

A healthy mind in a healthy body through well-balanced foods.

Thank God for every meal, every breath and work very hard to earn these meals. God only helps those who help themselves.

Some will stay bums generation after generation after generation, changing a country does not alter the laziness, and nothing can replace Karma. Some will stay karma veer/yogi/yoginis generation after generation after generation.

God will provide the food, but you have to work for it, you want beautiful things you have sweat for it.

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